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  1. 3 points
    What I would tell her is you buy a set amount a month and I will give you that free half you are asking for but if she spends nothing with you and just comes back with her hand out once a month thats not a offer that helps you and she is just trying to use you .
  2. 3 points
    Some do, should never be expected from you though. I will give my patients a freebie if I know they are a little short that month or to let them try a new strain.
  3. 2 points
    ALSO, police CANNOT take a blood test WITHOUT A WARRANT! Thus the need for a breathalyzer and a drug swab. IF YOU REFUSE a breathalyzer, its a crime and you can loose your license and be taken to jail! IF YOU REFUSE a drug swab, its a civil infraction which is ONLY punishable by a fine, AND NO swab = NO BLOOD TEST because they would NOT have the proof they need to get a warrant for a blood test. SO REFUSING the Drug Swab is SAFER and the SMARTER thing to do, unless you have not smoked for a few days and even then you are risking a false positive. REFUSE REFUSE REFUSE!!!!
  4. 2 points
    Wild Bill

    veg time

    I've never paid attention to length of time. When the plants get to the height I want, (generally 2 1/2 to 3 feet) I put them into flower. The length of time I leave them in flower varies from strain to strain. When the leaves yellow and the trichs are cloudy then I cut. It doesn't normally hurt anything to wait a little longer unless you wait a long time and all the trichs turn brown.
  5. 2 points
    yield was great. GPW was lower than typical but very happy with turnout. Harvested 1.5lb of trimmed cured bud per 600w light.
  6. 2 points
    wjkingsnorth

    Sour Grape!

    What an amazing strain. Very high yield, very sticky and sweet.
  7. 2 points
    There should be 2 doctors in the Saginaw area. I can find out for you. I know we have a quite a few that are willing to see minor children. Take documents showing the autism diagnosis along with the paperwork (typically they have it there). I haven’t ran into to many problems with parents obtaining a card for their child. You do have to pay for the doctors visits and I believe it’s still $65 to the state. You will receive a card for your child and one for you as a parent you HAVE to be the caregiver. If you have any questions please let me know, I’ve been treating my 12 year old for over 3 years now. 🌱🧩 💚
  8. 2 points
    semicaregiver

    Ph help

    Sounds like your well water has some elements that are acting as a buffering agent. This is a problem with Detroit (Great Lakes Water Authority) water. They add a buffering agent to prevent the water going acidic. Low ph will leach lead into the drinking water. While the source of your problem is some natural occurring element, the solution may be the same. I use a 55 gallon drum as a water storage reservoir and adjust the ph over a period of time. For example when I first fill it the ph is right around 7. Just like your experience I can ph it down to 5.8 (hydro usage). In a few hours it will shoot back up to around 6.6-6.8 due to the buffering chemicals that Detroit added. A second ph treatment will return the ph to my target, 5.8 and it will hold. I do not use all the water at once so I keep it aerated with a couple of air stones. My approach is not terribly sophisticated, just a solution that I found works for me from trial and error. Perhaps someone with more chemistry knowledge will have a simpler solution.
  9. 2 points
    The Marijuana Regulatory Agency (MRA) released the application process for adult-use recreational marijuana business licenses. The MRA will begin accepting adult-use marijuana applications on November 1, 2019. An overview of the licensing process Step one and step two applications for new applicants and existing medical marijuana facility licensees Detailed step-by-step instructions for the online applications Instructions for new applicants and existing marijuana facility licensees for each license type Application checklists Detailed paper instruction booklet including step-by-step instructions for paper applications While the MRA will accept paper applications, it is highly recommended that applicants use the online application, which has been specifically designed to ensure the efficient receipt of all necessary applicant information. Online applications will automatically be moved quickly into the processing system. Two-Step Application Process On November 1, 2019, the MRA will begin accepting applications for marijuana licensing under the Michigan Regulation and Taxation of Marihuana Act (MRTMA) which was passed by the voters of the state of Michigan in November 2018: The MRA will be utilizing a two-step application process: Prequalification Establishment Licensing Thinking of Starting a Cannabis or Hemp Business? If you are thinking about starting a business in this industry you will need legal guidance and corporate counsel. Contact our office or call Komorn Law at (248) 357-2550 to find out more information. Step One – Prequalification The main applicant and all supplemental applicants must submit step one applications for prequalification for review by the MRA. During this step, background checks are completed on the main applicant and all supplemental applicants. There is a $6,000 nonrefundable application fee for the main applicant, which is the entity or the individual seeking to hold the state license. The main applicant is required to submit a step one prequalification application. Supplemental applicants can be entities or individuals. The definition of who is considered a supplemental applicant varies, depending on business structure. Every supplemental applicant is required to submit a step one prequalification application but only the main applicant needs to submit an application fee. It is important that the main applicant does not submit payment until all supplemental applications have been submitted. If payment is received before all supplemental applications are submitted, a notice of deficiency will be sent stating that the main applicant has five days to submit all supplemental applications or the application may be denied. The Marijuana Regulatory Agency will begin to process prequalification applications once the $6,000 prequalification application payment is received. Step Two – Establishment Licensing After the main applicant and all supplemental applicants have successfully achieved step one prequalification, the main applicant can submit step two licensing applications for the license type(s) it seeks to hold. During step two licensing, the MRA will vet the proposed marijuana establishment, including, but not limited to: Business specifications Proof of financial responsibility Municipality information General employee information The physical marijuana establishment must pass an MRA inspection within 60 days of submission of a complete application. Applicants who are seeking licensure as a grower, processor, or a microbusiness must pass a Bureau of Fire Services (BFS) plan review. Additionally, all MRTMA marijuana applicants – except temporary marijuana events and marijuana event organizers – must pass a BFS inspection within 60 days of submission of a complete application. Due to the level of detail involved in the step one and step two adult-use application processes – as well as the time sensitive nature of the process – the MRA strongly recommends achieving step one prequalification before submitting a step two application. Final Approval An applicant cannot be issued a state license until all requirements in the MRTMA and administrative rules are met. After establishment licensing (step two) is completed, an applicant will be required to pay an initial licensure fee for each license. Once the initial licensure fee is received, the license(s) will be issued. There are 17 potential reasons for license denial outlined in Rule 14 of the Adult-Use emergency rules, including the following: The applicant failed to correct a deficiency within five days of notification by the MRA in accordance with Rule 8 (application requirements; complete application) The applicant failed to receive a passing prelicensure inspection within 60 days of a complete application being submitted to the agency The applicant has submitted an application containing false information The applicant or anyone who will have ownership in the marijuana establishment has a pattern of convictions involving dishonesty, theft, or fraud that indicate the proposed marijuana establishment is unlikely to be operated with honesty and integrity The applicant or anyone who will have ownership in the marijuana establishment has a conviction involving distribution of a controlled substance to a minor License Types To be eligible for the following license types, the main applicant does not need to possess a medical marijuana state operating license: Class A Marijuana Grower Marijuana Microbusiness Designated Consumption Establishment Marijuana Safety Compliance Facility Marijuana Event Organizer Temporary Marijuana Event To be eligible for the following license types, the main applicant must possess a medical marijuana state operating license: Class B Marijuana Grower Class C Marijuana Grower Excess Marijuana Grower Marijuana Processor Marijuana Retailer Marijuana Secure Transporter The post Marijuana Regulatory Agency Releases Licensing for Adult-Use Applications appeared first on Komorn Law. View the full article
  10. 2 points
  11. 2 points
    glued gorilla

    When do you trim?

    Yes it is! Still worth trying dry trim though. There is difference in aroma, that some people say is absolutely worth the trouble of dry trim. I go for the ease of wet trim,F the dry trim for me!
  12. 2 points
    wjkingsnorth

    When do you trim?

    Wet trimming is absolutely easiest.
  13. 2 points
    High quality 100% organic marijuana. Must become official patient to receive meds. $150 donation per oz+free delivery within the Muskegon area. $10 delivery fee outside the Muskegon area. Will grow strains of your choosing if you provide the seeds or choose from strains currently available. Looking for something long-term with someone with moderate and consistent needs. Let's talk!Currently available:Granola Funk501st OG24K OGDark Ghost Train aka Grape Ghost
  14. 2 points
    Peacefulfields

    Can AUTOflowers be cloned?

    Here are a few Large Frosty Autoflowers From New Holland Seedbank. Done in under 10 weeks from seed not just flower. And yes if your a great cloner you can yield quite a bit more if your a master of deep water culture.
  15. 2 points
    I take 800 mgs of ibuprofen every 4 hours in addition to cannabis. The only troubling side effect I get from the cannabis is occasional lethargy. The ibuprofen however causes me frequent stomach pain and may eventually give me ulcers or some other gastrointestinal issue. Ibuprofen was first invented in 1961. Cannabis has been used safely since the dawn of time. Cannabis is the safer of the two.
  16. 2 points
    wjkingsnorth

    Outdoor Plants

    My outdoor plants are inside now that all the mothers are harvested. It is amazing how much better they are doing now that they are getting full sun (all be it artificial) 12/12. The buds have dramatically increased in size the last few days. Gonna have to get the microscope out and see how far along the Trichomes are.
  17. 2 points
    Restorium2

    When do you trim?

    Same here. With trimming it while fresh, within minutes of cutting the buds off, the leaves haven't curled all in and stuck to the bud. I don't know how someone can dig the small leaves out of the stickiness. Must not be that sticky? With mine you just about have to wet trim it or it's a leafy mass. I like the leafless sculpted bud look. My peeps are spoiled. Some folks are lazy trimmers.
  18. 1 point
    Slappy

    veg time

    I usually would veg big plants, lollypop(take clones), then flower. However, I recently began flowering smaller plants and doing no lolly popping. Same usual gas. I guess it depends on personal preference.
  19. 1 point
    Make sure to understand what a roadside impairment test is and how to pass it. It's your best line of defense.
  20. 1 point
    glued gorilla

    veg time

    I stay under mine also, have 3 patients plus me currently. Run a total of 18, 9 veg 9 flower
  21. 1 point
    glued gorilla

    veg time

    Thanks, I knew I wasn't crazy! Lol. yeah, I run 9 under 2 1000w DE lights in a 9x 9 ish room. This guy used to do small plants in a tent, and did well, so he thinks small plants are the best way to go. Imo, in my space 9 bigger plants is a lot easier than 30 or more small ones.
  22. 1 point
    blackhorse

    veg time

    I prefer 8 weeks of veg and then 8-9 weeks of flower. It also depends on number of plants. Usually only run 2 plants under a light. (prefer one plant)
  23. 1 point
    Adrian Bach

    When Baking, What Temp?

    I also used to believe that you couldn't get high eating raw cannabis, until a doctor friend of mine informed me that chewing a small bud for at least 15 minutes (like a cow chews a cud of grass or hay) will decarboxylate it. I tried this the next day and almost wished I hadn't at first, until the effects started to mellow a bit. In all of my 50 plus years of using cannabis, I never once got as stoned from smoking it as I did that first time just eating a raw gram. I've been a daily consumer for over a half century and also a Cannabis Cup winner. According to DJ Short (also a Cannabis Cup winner), I was his main lab rat over 40 years ago, in the development of his famous Blueberry strains. He's also the person who introduced me to that doctor in the first place. I was also employed by the University of Wisconsin Drug Information Center as a psychedelics expert in the late 60's, early 70's. You could say I'm rather experienced. Since that first time eating a raw bud (about 1 gram), I've been eating only about a quarter gram at time with great results. Remember, you must chew on it for at least 15 to 20 minutes before swallowing otherwise nothing will happen. Be careful and start with just a very small amount.
  24. 1 point
    Nearly a year after voters approved adult use of recreational marijuana, Oakland County resident Kevin John Carlson continues to fight a possession/intent to deliver case, which he believes stems from a search warrant that should never have been granted. Carlson, 30, was charged in early 2018 after police searched his Bloomfield Township home and reportedly found marijuana and other evidence — months prior to cannabis being legalized in Michigan. At the time Carlson was a registered marijuana patient and caregiver, legally allowed to have a certain amount of cannabis. The magistrate who issued the search warrant — based on police reportedly smelling marijuana outside the home — was wrong to do so because it wasn’t based on probable cause, Carlson claimed. Thinking of Starting a Cannabis or Hemp Business? When it comes to cannabis and hemp business. Komorn Law is the law firm you need with local as well as international networks and assets when your business needs to go global. Contact our office to find out more information. Call 248-357-2550 The court further found that the 2008 Michigan Medical Marihuana Act didn’t shield Carlson from the search, stating “the police were not obligated to determine, before obtaining a search warrant, the legality of the marijuana-related activities inside the defendant’s home and whether the defendant’s activities complied with the MMMA.” However, Carlson’s defense attorney Michael Komorn said the judges failed to address if current Michigan marijuana law can be applied retroactively and are wrong in not considering its relevancy, as well as the state reclassification of medical marijuana as a Schedule II drug — permitted for some use. Carlson’s case is next headed to the Michigan Supreme Court for consideration, which earlier had remanded it to the Court of Appeals. “This case is important for Fourth Amendment issues (regarding protection against unreasonable search and seizure) for constitutional reasons,” Komorn said, “and for the citizens of Michigan…just because somebody is doing something suspicious, that’s not enough for probable cause.” Read the rest of the story HERE at the Oakland Press By Aileen Wingblad awingblad@medianewsgroup.com @awingblad on Twitter Contact Us For a Free Case Evaluation First Name Last Name Email Phone Message 6 + 10 = Submit The post Is smell enough to justify search warrant? Bloomfield Township man appealing decision on marijuana case appeared first on Komorn Law. View the full article
  25. 1 point
    Slappy

    Sour Grape!

    You can't tease us like that and not share genetics. LOL. Sounds dope. Got a pic?
  26. 1 point
    Wild Bill

    Humidity Packets?

    https://www.teaforum.org/viewtopic.php?t=177
  27. 1 point
    Cali is feeling it hard rn. They have a strong grassroots movement and are doing well with it. They have established groups of their own groups of growers and caregivers alike to lobby against the big corporations and to try and establish a fair market for everyone to compete in. I think doing this is probably our best chance at keeping big corp from monopolizing market share. We need to build caregiver coalitions and local groups willing to stand up and rally lobby and "compete" in this corporate game against them. We must play this game and remember that WE have been playing this much longer than them. WE know our markets and our patients/consumers. We from the mitten know our mitten and will be the best at providing what fellow michiganders want and need in their meds not out of state corp greedy money hungry sharks. We are here for the patients. The caregiver network. And for our personal human rights. We need to take the focus off the greed and dollar and put it back to the elderly, sick, etc. We must show our state this. Let's rally together build alliances & coalitions and local forms of competition for these corps. We can keep our community. We just may have to get our hands dirty. But hey. We should all be used to getting our hands dirty!
  28. 1 point
    Wild Bill

    Ph help

    Are your plants healthy? If they're growing OK you may not need to chase the perfect ph around. Don't worry too much unless you see signs of a problem.
  29. 1 point
    I would think any kush would work well to help you sleep the longer you grow it the better to get the couchlock effect.
  30. 1 point
    blackhorse

    Outdoor Plants

    I do a maintenance spray every couple weeks while in veg stage. Once flower sets in, no chemical spray. Also change up on the type of spray. Been lucky since starting new grow, no bugs.
  31. 1 point
    Wild Bill

    Outdoor Plants

    If they already have buds you may not want to spray chemicals on them.
  32. 1 point
    Restorium2

    Where To Find Seeds

    This post from you below shows how spammy and scammy you are. You post like you are asking about it but you actually own it. I wouldn't buy a thing from someone who is a scammy liar like that. Hello has anyone tried this seedbank out of West Michigan? www.newhollandseedbank.com They have the largest selection both with High CBD & THC Strains of Feminized Autoflowers & a good selection of Michigan Outdoor Photoperiod genetics as well. What are the laws on seeds as of 9/2019
  33. 1 point
    glued gorilla

    Where To Find Seeds

    Just Google New Holland Seed bank, it comes up. Looks like all fems and autos, not my bag
  34. 1 point
    blackhorse

    Where To Find Seeds

    Peacefulfields did post 3 years ago with seeds. On this same page.
  35. 1 point
    Wild Bill

    Where To Find Seeds

    Every post about New Holland Seed Bank?
  36. 1 point
    Slappy

    Can AUTOflowers be cloned?

    Alien VS. Triangle F2 -94 days. Below is a pic after dried, and is one of the most potent strains I've ever grown. I wish I cloned this one for sure. Other seeds from the pack had potency and wicked terps, but nothing came close to this one. Ish was so strong, I'd compare it closer to GG#4 than anything else I've had. Don't knock autos, you just need to find the right breeder.
  37. 1 point
    You get one when you use the online form.
  38. 1 point
    Wild Bill

    What do you do for vacations?

    I grew in hydro for years and had a 50 gallon reservoir so it was never a problem. They put in new waterlines down the road from me and apparently put some additive in the water that wiped out my whole crop. I took cuttings, put them in soil and never got around to cleaning my hydro system so I've been growing in dirt ever since. Not too long ago I tried setting the plants in pans of water so they can draw the water up from the bottom. This works well for a few days but for a week or longer the plants don't like it and have very poor yields. I may use my hydro reservoirs to set up a drip system. That seems to be the easiest idea.
  39. 1 point
    Slappy

    What do you do for vacations?

    Lots of systems can achieve this. Issues of concern are: fluctuating PH, temperature of nutrient solution, adequate oxygenation, and needing some sort of add-back formula and/or reservoir change. it can be done, one of my buddies did it. He had success, but it was the bugs that got him since he was unable to keep up regular maintenance. Going a week drain-to-waste would require a pretty decent sized reservoir, but a smaller one would suffice using a recirculating system. Basically, it would be hard to do on a budget.
  40. 1 point
    I'm wondering why you have the rules wrong if you work at a dispensary???? What a patient can do while they are waiting for their card is use the approved email from LARA at the dispensaries. No one can legally use a doctor's note to buy at a dispensary. If you have used your card at a dispensary they would have a picture of your original on file. Go to that dispensary, tell them that you lost your card, and they may help you since they already have your records and expiration date. You could also use your approved email from the State (if you still have it) to buy at any dispensary.
  41. 1 point
    hero4u

    What could be wrong with my plants?

    also thanks i started topping the plants just recently and already having great reults.
  42. 1 point
    This article chronicles the implementation of the Michigan Medical Marijuana Act, passed via referendum in the 2008 general election. As expected, once applied to our human tapestry, the MMA has been subjected to some already-classic judicial interpretations, with a strong promise of more to come. The Michigan Legislature passed the MMA on December 4, 2008, making Michigan the 13th state to allow the cultivation and possession of marijuana for medical purposes. The Act cited a series of findings related to the beneficial uses of marijuana in treating nausea, pain and other effects from a variety of debilitating medical conditions. The Act also notes that according to the FBI, 99% of all marijuana possession arrests nationwide are done pursuant to state, rather than federal law. It is important to note that possession of the drug remains illegal under federal law. The MMA defines a "debilitating medical condition" as cancer, glaucoma, HIV, hepatitis C, and other diseases along with other chronic afflictions which cause pain and nausea. A "primary caregiver" is defined as, "a person who is at least 21 years old and who has agreed to assist with a patient's medical use of marijuana and who has never been convicted of a felony involving illegal drugs." A "qualifying patient" is "a person who has been diagnosed by a physician as having a debilitating medical condition." The basic mechanics of the Act provide that qualifying patients and primary care providers (marijuana growers) must possess a "registry identification card", issued by the Department of Community Health. Tens of thousands of applications have been processed; many thousands remain pending with more filed every week; the demand for certification, for marijuana, is seemingly insatiable here in Michigan. The high demand is understandable. Cardholders are not subject to arrest or prosecution for marijuana possession / distribution provided the patient keeps less than 2.5 ounces of smokeable pot. Care providers are allowed to maintain up to 12 plants for each qualified patient; stems, seeds and unusable roots do not count toward the plant limitation. Physicians also have immunity from prosecution relative to their certification of the patient's need for the drug, so long as they conduct an assessment of the patient's medical history. A legitimate physician-patient relationship is required. Since the US Supreme Court decided the case of Conant vs Walters in 2003, physicians have been able to recommend a patient's use of marijuana (but cannot prescribe pot by placing the recommendation on a prescription form). Doctors can also make notes regarding their recommendations in the patient's chart and can testify on behalf of a patient's medical use of marijuana in a court of law. The Supreme Court's Conant decision paved the way for passage of the MMA. Primary care providers may receive compensation for their marijuana. Selling marijuana paraphernalia also is allowed under the MMA, and such paraphernalia cannot be seized. Persons merely present during the use of marijuana for medical purposes likewise are not subject to arrest. Sound too good to be true? When marijuana is distributed to persons other than qualifying patients, the registration card is revoked, and the provider is subject to a 2-year felony. Also, driving while under the influence of marijuana remains illegal, as does smoking in public. Use or possession of pot on school premises or on school buses remains prohibited. And yes, it remains illegal to smoke in a jail or a penitentiary, regardless of your medical condition. The Act set a short timetable (120-days) for the Department of Community Health to promulgate regulations for the administration of the possession / distribution credential. The delay in the promulgation of these regulations gave way to confusion among law enforcement, the public and some judges as to what is legal and what is illegal. For example, the 2009 Redden case from Madison Heights involved a couple arrested during a drug-raid. The couple had applied for certification cards prior to their arrest and received the cards a month after their arrest. In dismissing the case brought against the two defendants, 43rd District Judge Robert Turner characterized the MMA as, "the worst piece of legislation I've seen in my life", according to the Detroit News. Judge Turner's dismissal was appealed by the Oakland County Prosecutor where it was affirmed in the Oakland County Circuit Court. Earlier this year, the Michigan Court of Appeals affirmed Oakland Circuit Court Judge Martha Anderson's reinstatement of the criminal charges against Redden and Clark. Now, the accused Madison Heights couple will either have to plead or go to trial. At the time of the raid on the couple's residence, the Oakland County Sheriff seized 1.5 ounces of pot, some nominal cash, and about 21 small plants. Three weeks prior to the raid, each defendant had submitted to a medical certification exam with Dr. Eric Eisenbud (not making it up) of Colorado (and of the recently founded Hemp and Cannabis Foundation Medical Clinic) and applied for a medical marijuana card pursuant to the MMA. Their cards, however, had not been issued at the time of the raid. At the couple's preliminary examination before Judge Turner, the prosecutor argued that: a) the defendants were required to abstain from "medicating" with marijuana while their applications to the State of Michigan's Department of Community Health were pending; and b) the defendants did not have a bona fide physician-patient relationship with Dr. Eisenbud. Judge Turner indicated that the MMA was confusing relative to what constituted a reasonable amount of marijuana. The defendants in this case were found with an ounce and a half; the MMA allows 2.5 ounces. Judge Turner made the following ruling: For that reason, I believe that section 8 entitles the defendants to a dismissal, even though they did not possess the valid medical card, because section 8 says if they can show the fact that a doctor believed that they were likely to receive a therapeutic benefit , and this doctor testified to that. And Dr. Eisenbud is a physician licensed by the State of Michigan. And that's the only requirement that the statute has. You don't have to be any type of physician, you just have to be a licensed physician by the State of Michgan. So, based on that, I find section 8 does apply. And I believe I'm obligated to dismiss this matter based on section 8 of the statute. Under the applicable court rules, the prosecutor appealed the district court dismissal to the Oakland Circuit Court. In reversing her district court counter-part, Judge Anderson held that Judge Turner improperly acted as a finder of fact in dismissing the case. Judge Anderson also questioned whether the couple could avail themselves of the MMA's affirmative defenses at all, due to their purported failures to comply with the provisions of the act; ie keeping the pot segregated and locked-up, and waiting until they received their cards from the Department of Community Health prior to growing their pot. At the time of the Madison Heights bust, however, the couple could not have received marijuana cards because the DCH had not started issuing the cards. To date, almost 30,000 certifications have been issued. In their September 2010 opinion affirming Judge Martha Anderson, the Court of Appeals held that the MMA's affirmative defenses were available to defendants even though they did not have their cards at the time their pot was confiscated. The Court of Appeals held against defendants, however, on the basis that, at the time of their preliminary examination in district court, their affirmative defense under the MMA was incomplete and thus created fact questions. The Court found the following fact issues to be unresolved at the conclusion of the exam: the bona fides of the physician-patient relationship; whether the amount of marijuana found in the residence was "reasonable" under the Act; and whether the marijuana was being used by defendants for palliative purposes, as required by the Act. The most interesting thing about the Court of Appeals' Redden decision is the scathing concurring opinion of Judge Peter D. O'Connell. Judge O'Connell wrote separately because he would have more narrowly tailored the affirmative defenses available in the MMA, and because he wished to "elaborate" on some of the general discussion of the Act set forth in the briefs and at oral argument. Elaborate he did. Judge O'Connell's 30-page opinion first notes that the possession, distribution and manufacture of marijuana remains a federal crime and further notes that Congress has expressly found the plant to have "no acceptable medical uses." In what will undoubtedly become a classic line from his opinion, Judge O'Connell writes, "I will attempt to cut through the haze surrounding this legislation." The judge is skeptical that folks are really using pot to "medicate" and suspects that they are using the plant for recreational purposes. He also takes note of the poor quality of the legislation to the extent that it conflicts with other provisions set forth in the Health Code. Judge O'Connell next takes a tour de force through the legislative history of the MMA. Here, we learn that the act was based on model legislation proposed by lobbyists known as the Marijuana Policy Project of Washington DC The group advances both the medicinal and recreational uses of marijuana. "Confusion", and lots of it, is how Judge O'Connell views the MMA. In one of the many footnotes to his opinion, the Judge warns against all marijuana use until the score is settled, once and for all, by the Michigan Supreme Court: Until our Supreme Court provides a final comprehensive interpretation of this act, it would be prudent for the citizens of this state to avoid all use of marijuana if they do not wish to risk violating state law. I again issue a stern warning to all: please do not attempt to interpret this act on your own. Reading this act is similar to participating in the Triwizard Tournament described in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire: the maze that is this statute is so complex that the final result will only be known once the Supreme Court has had an opportunity to review and remove the haze from this act. Euan Abercrombie, 1st year student at the Hogwarts school would probably remark; "Wow". For their part, the criminal defense bar, commenting via listserv, have basically gone wild over the concurring opinion, with its multiple web site references and pictures of marijuana advertisements. The consensus among the defense bar, however, is that the majority opinion is correct and that Judge Anderson, at the end of the day, got it right; Redden was not the cleanest case to dismiss under the Act. The Oakland County Sheriff and Prosecutor correctly anticipated the Court of Appeals' September decision. A few weeks prior to the Redden decision, they conducted a series of dispensary raids, ruffling tons of feathers along the way. Of course, an application for leave to appeal has been filed with the Michigan Supreme Court. For additional procedural guidance, we have prepared a legal guide for the MMA for those seeking to use marijuana for legitimate palliative purposes under the Act. Take note, however, that at least one appellate jurist would have folks managing chronic "pain" with prescription meds until the medical marijuana mess is sorted out by our Supreme Court. Redden is not the only case causing some MMA consternation. Rodney Koon's case has received notoriety. Koon was convicted of a misdemeanor because he admitted to police that he used marijuana to "medicate" earlier in the day that he was pulled-over by the police. Koon also admitted to consuming a beer, but his blood alcohol was within legal limits. Without sufficient funds to appeal, Koon is stuck with his conviction, even though he had a pot card at the time of his arrest. Ordinances have sprung-up across the state to truncate the scope of the MMA. Bloomfield Hills, for example, passed an ordinance in October requiring card-carrying certified medical marijuana users to register with the Bloomfield Township Police Department. The ordinance also requires the submission of a form to the police disclosing the "patient's" drivers license number and date of birth, whether the patient owns or rents their home, and identifying how many other patients share their home. In addition, the ordinance limits the number of medical marijuana patients that can live at one address and prohibits growing medical marijuana anywhere in Bloomfield Township. Violation of the ordinance is a 93-day misdemeanor carrying a $ 500 fine. Bloomfield Hills is among several municipalities that have passed ordinances that restrict the provisions of the Medical Marijuana Act, criminalize conduct authorized by the Act, or both. Now the ordinance is the subject of a lawsuit filed against the township by two crafty [their "clients" are John and Jane Doe] veteran criminal defense attorneys: Tom Loeb and Neil Rockind. The lawsuit, undoubtedly heading to the Michigan Supreme Court, does not seek money damages but rather, declarative and injunctive relief. Township by township, the MMA is coming under fire for a glaring flaw: it is a ruse for recreational pot users. Yes, there are legitimate medical marijuana users out there, in spades, for whom the MMA was designed to help. There are also many "patients" whose medical records were reviewed with a passing glance by a physician more interested in the high-volume review fees than in determining whether the person has a genuine chronic medical condition of the sort required by the MMA. The LawBlogger wonders how many certified users, among the tens of thousands of backlogged applicants, are under the age of 25; or are college kids whose only chronic condition is their desire to party down. As these legal challenges grind through the court system over the next two or three years, the MMA will be subject to death-by-ordinance on a township-by-township basis. Attorneys Rockind and Loeb remarked in their press conference announcing their lawsuit that the ordinance in Bloomfield Hills cannot stand to the extent it contradicts a valid Michigan law. While it may not be the best example of tightly drafted legislation; while it undoubtedly suffers from problems of perception / deception, the MMA is a valid state law. The appellate courts will have no choice but to invalidate ordinances that limit the scope of the Act, or criminalize it's legitimate purposes. This past fall, the recent election was a set-back for progressive marijuana laws. California's Proposition 19 lost by a vote of 56% to 44%. If successful, the proposed law would have been the first in the country to legalize the recreational use of marijuana. In Arizona, the medical marijuana proposition lost. In California, the pot initiative lost because too few voters under age 26 turned out and moderate voters rejected the initiative. Recent violence with Mexican drug gangs in both California and Arizona did not help either initiative. Mixed messages float around the issue here in Michigan. Recently, a huge pot-expo scheduled for the Pontiac Silverdome, billed as the largest pot-party in the world, was canceled at the last minute. All this raises the questions: do we really need to legalize pot? Is ours a pot-smoking nation? Does marijuana have genuine palliative properties? One of the major problems of perception with medical marijuana laws is that folks are simply going through the administrative steps to get "medically" certified to use pot, but are smoking on a recreational basis. No good comes of a law that sets requirements that are perceived as a farce. It would perhaps be better to legalize marijuana outright, then regulate its production, sale, and distribution. California was really looking forward to billions in pot-derived state revenue. Here in Michigan, there is confusion about who can legally grow pot and how it should be grown and distributed to "patients". In Arizona, the question is too close to call 3-days after the mid-term elections. So then, what are they smoking? That's what Detroit-based Cannabis Counsel lawyer Matthew Abel is asking of the Michigan Senate Judiciary Committee, who met earlier this year, in January, in order to discuss a package of bills which would amend the public health code so that medical marijuana must be dispensed by pharmacists, and to classify medical marijuana as a schedule 2 controlled substance. "It seems that if the legislature ever passed these bills, they would be in conflict with the medical marijuana statute," Abel said. "So they'd need a 3/4 vote to supersede the law, and you know that they can't even get 3/4 of the legislature to agree on lunch, let alone this." Southfield-based lawyer Michael Komorn, who also serves as the treasurer for the Michigan Medical Marijuana Association, said the bills are similar to bills introduced last year; last year, the bills which also would have allowed for 10 marijuana growing facilities to be affiliated with a pharmacy, got no traction. This year incarnation of the bills would essentially make all production of medical marijuana illegal, though use would still be protected by law, Komorn said. "It's like the stamp act, arcane and without any understanding of what really is going on with patient needs," Komorn said. "Bottom line, this is an attempt to repeal the Michigan medical marijuana act." It's impossible, Abel said, to require dispensing of medical marijuana through pharmacies. "They don't have a supply, and no way to get it. There's just no way for them to do it," Abel said. Still, he's resting easy with the idea that the bills are going nowhere, and are really more about grandstanding for political popularity than they are about the Michigan medical marijuana law. Now that the MMA has been around long enough to generate some interesting cases and controversies, we must wait until one of them percolates through the Michigan Supreme Court in order to get a true sense of this legislation. Our blog takes the position that the MMA is flawed and thus, exposed to failure, so long as it can be used to mask recreational pot use. Perhaps the most common sense thing to do at this point is what Peter Tosh called for world-wide: just legalize it. Source by Timothy P. Flynn The post The Michigan Medical Marijuana Act: The First 24-Months appeared first on Komorn Law. View the full article
  43. 1 point
    Wild Bill

    When do you trim?

    I cut off the larger leaves before I chop the plant. It's easier when it's standing up. Then I cut off the individual branches and trim them individually.
  44. 1 point
    Gary, Sounds great! Looking forward to a report on grams/watt results. Back early on I asked about the color of the light, i.e. the usual blinding purple or white. I see many of the newest fixtures I see advertised appear to be white. Not having used LED's myself it would seem that white would make it easier to judge how things are going if you have been use to seeing your plants under traditional HPS.
  45. 1 point
    Kingdiamond

    When do you trim?

    Right off the plant straight into the mesh hanger it cuts down on the drying time .
  46. 1 point
    Brent Foust

    Medical Marijuana Strain For Pain

    It is better not to use Marijuana for pain. The Food and Drug Administration has not approved for use in any medical condition. Instead of consuming Marijuana you can take a pain killer like Ibuprofen.
  47. 1 point
    Full article: https://blogs.timesofisrael.com/cannabis-and-autism-an-informal-update-2019/
  48. 1 point
    July 31, 2018 -A Detroit Judge dismissed felony charges against six people arrested in a raid of a Detroit medical marijuana grow facility. All charges against Curtis Williams, 36; Cotea Jeanne Walsh, 37; Jones, 53; Travis Davison, 27; Jabari Currie, 31; and James Frazier, 32, of Detroit, were dismissed following a raid in the city of Detroit on May 29, 2018. Charges included felony drug delivery and manufacturing charges, both carrying up to 15 years in prison. Prosecutors argued that the facility on the 4400 block of West Jefferson Avenue was not licensed to grow marijuana. (Photo: Detroit Police Department) The Detroit Police Department’s Gang Intelligence Unit executed a search warrant at the medical marijuana facility and seized 200 marijuana plants, about $1 million worth, authorities said. “Over 1,000” plants were found in the raid, according to the Wayne County prosecutor’s office. (Note: 1000 or 200 plants or whatever) Officers seized marijuana and held employees at gunpoint during the May 29 raid, according to Harrington and his partners in the Denver-based marijuana company Viola Brands. All cannabis at the site was taken, the business’ accounts were frozen and employees’ vehicles were seized, according to the company. A defense attorney in the case, Michael Komorn, said the facility was granted a temporary operation’s certification from the city, allowing up to 1,500 plants while the facility waited for the filing process to be approved by the city. Komorn said the Wayne County Prosecutor’s Office made the argument that the facility only was allowed to sell, and not grow, at the facility. “That’s absurd,” Komorn said. “It’s a semantic issue because I would say everyone would understand that if they’ve been given permission to sell it, of course a medical marijuana caregivers center includes growing and cultivating marijuana.” The grow op’s certificate of occupancy from the city stated the intent for a greenhouse at the site, and the operation holds a temporary Class C license under Michigan’s Medical Marihuana Facilities Licensing Act allowing up to 1,500 plants, said 36th District Court Judge Kenneth King. Judge Kenneth King of 36th District Court dismissed the case “in the interest of fairness.” “In the interest of fairness and in the spirit of always trying to do the right thing, this court is left with no other choice but to dismiss this matter,” the judge said. King said he stayed up until 3:30 a.m. reading briefs in the case and sorting out the web of acronyms tied to Michigan’s medical marijuana law and the “seed-to-sale” tracking and tax, regulation and licensing system for marijuana growers and dispensaries that took effect late last year. “That kind of leads me to the burning question: if you’re able to dispense but you can’t grow it, how are you supposed to get it? Where are you supposed to get it from?” “I don’t believe the police had any malintent. The police are doing their job,” King said. “I think the real blame lies on the documents that were submitted and someone didn’t pay close attention to what the defendants were asking for.” Komorn said King understood his argument, and said the judge responded: “That kind of leads me to the burning question: ‘If you’re able to dispense but you can’t grow it, how are you supposed to get it? Where are you supposed to get it from?’ ” The case had been set for a preliminary exam Tuesday. King said he expected his ruling to be appealed regardless of whether it favored the prosecution or defense. Here is a statement from the Wayne County Prosecutor’s Office: “I have confirmed that the court granted the defense motion to dismiss the case. However, I don’t have a written opinion. “It is my understanding that the court held that the defendants operated in good faith regarding all the provisions of the law that they knew about the class C license (1500 plants) for a grow operation. The duty was on the city of Detroit to inform them about what was required and they failed to do so.” All charges were dismissed Tuesday July 31, 2018. Also…Michigan voters will decide on a ballot question Nov. 6 that would legalize and tax recreational marijuana for users 21 and older. Medical marijuana was legalized in Michigan via a ballot proposal in 2008. Komorn Law has represented numerous clients through the legal chaos of starting up a business in the Michigan Medical Marihuana Industry. Contact Us For More Information. 800-656-3557 The post Detroit Judge Dismissed Felony Charges Against Medical Marijuana Grow Facility appeared first on Komorn Law. View the full article
  49. 1 point
    Restorium2

    I have extra clones

    Cops wish we thought this way.
  50. 1 point
    Yes, these bolded statement are describing drug interactions that you don't see with cannabis alone. I have seen that LSD can change a mind forever. The personality that was there is gone and replaced with something else. In my opinion, what stands in the way of our human minds advancing is that we must move forward as a species without anyone left behind. So the humans with the least advanced minds are what is holding us back. It's been like that every time we make a huge advancement as a species. Like when we started to be able to think about our own thoughts. The most advanced human minds can move forward at the same speed as the least advanced. No one will be left behind, we move forward as a species. Read Cosmic Consciousness by Richard Maurice Bucke, M.D.
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