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  1. 5 points
    Easy E

    Bud porn !

    Whole plant shots of Northern King and Skunkberry. The rest of my pics are too large of files to upload here.
  2. 4 points
    Easy E

    Bud porn !

    First shot is Northern King by Peak Seeds BC (tester), second is Skunkberry by Peak Seeds BC.
  3. 3 points
    Been looking at doing a cycle using a dual arc bulb I have used EYE hortilux bulbs almost a decade but the bulbs are pricey and ive been watching a lot of YOUTUBE growers getting killer results adding the blue spectrum to their flower room I will update this post when I start seeing results to do a comparison with previous grows yields flavors bud appearance etc.
  4. 3 points
    Our clients in Wayne and Garden City were charged with four counts of controlled substance felonies, as well as the police seizing retirement bank accounts, vehicles and other unrelated property. Count 1: Controlled Substances – Delivery / Manufacture of marijuana 5-45 kilograms Count 2: Controlled Substances – Delivery / Manufacture of marijuana 5-45 kilograms At the time of the charged offense, the clients were valid registered patients and caregivers with the Michigan Medical Marihuana Program, and were in possession of their cards, and identification at all times during the incident. At the time of the execution of the search warrant, officers were aware the accused were medical marihuana patients and caregivers. In the criminal case in Garden City we had to file many motions to maintain and preserve our client’s rights. · Motion for immunity from prosecution, Section 4 MMMA defense. · Motion for immunity from arrest, Section 4 MMMA Defense. · Motion in Limine to preclude the Search Warrant as defective. · Motion to dismiss charges, Section 4 paraphernalia MMMA defense. · Motion in Limine to preclude evidence from an unconstitutional warrantless cell phone search. · Motion to return untainted property based on lack of a probable cause. Simultaneously, the county seizes assets via civil asset forfeiture laws at the same time as the criminal charges. If you do not challenge the civil asset forfeiture, the county or state will just take the property. The only the police and prosecutors are required to give you is the piece of paper that they hand you when the police take the property. For our clients to get their bank accounts back and other property, we had to file motions to compel the court to uphold our client’s constitutional rights to their property. After putting in an appearance on the forfeiture case, the prosecutor failed to notice us of any actions. When we showed up to court, the forfeiture case was dismissed due to “Failure to Serve” in 2015. Wayne County Prosecutors then refiled the forfeiture case TWO years later. We fought again with a series of motions. · Motion to dismiss due to statute of limitations, failure to refile case “promptly”. · Motion to quash discovery. · Motion to dismiss, Section 4 MMMA defense to any penalty (forfeiture). · Motion / Memo to demand a show cause hearing for reason why property was not returned. The clients were charged by the police who thought they were committing serious crimes. The police officers thought, based on their training and experience, our clients were manufacturing marijuana. In cross-examinations of the police officers involved in the raids, we asked a few standard questions. Mr. Komorn : Have you read the Michigan Medical Marihuana Act? Sgt. Police officer: The whole thing? How are the enforcers of the law supposed to carry out the law, if they don’t know the law? How are the police officers supposed to decide who is in compliance with the law and who is not in compliance with the law? There are also 2,000 pages of case law on the Michigan Medical Marihuana Act, detailing out various immunities and procedures that are not being followed by the police. The police were overzealous and caused ridiculous violations of our client’s constitutional rights. Our clients were charged with the following crimes in Garden City, due to the police using false and incompetent search warrants. Controlled substance--- Manufacture of Marijuana, contrary to MCL; 333.7401(2)(d)(ii), a 7 year felony Controlled substance--- Possession with Intent to Deliver Marijuana, contrary to MCL; 333.7401(2)(d)(ii), a 7 year felony The criminal case against our client was dismissed in Garden City after filing two motions. · Motion to suppress evidence due to lack of probable cause. · Motion to return untainted property. The judge in the case read the original search warrants and said it was ridiculously deficient! https://www.wxyz.com/news/rep-lucido-says-bill-would-prevent-police-from-seizing-innocent-peoples-stuff
  5. 3 points
    I have an opening and im in your area here is a link to my ad if your interested in getting together and discuss becoming my patient send me a private message and we can talk out of view.
  6. 2 points
  7. 2 points
    The public hearing for public comments will be heard on April 27, 2018. Read more about it at http://komornlaw.com/petitions After the MMMA was enacted by a vote of 63% of Michigan voters in 2008, the legislature has declined to add any new qualifying conditions to protect patients from arrest. Senator Rick Jones even attempted to remove Glaucoma from the MMMP's list of qualifying conditions. Patients , caregivers and other interested parties wrote in opposition to the bill. A handful of petitions have been submitted over the years. LARA (and the previous MDCH department) have used various reasons and tricks to deny these petitions. Only Post Traumatic Stress Disorder has been added as a qualifying condition to the Michigan Medical Marihuana Act. Autism and Parkinson's disorder petitions were approved by the Michigan medical marihuana review board (the board consists mostly of physicians). These petitions were denied by the LARA director. The petitions were not deficient in any way and should have been accepted by LARA. We resubmitted the Autism petition again, with 20 additional research studies. Now, with the help of numerous patients, researchers, Dwight Z. and Dr. Christian Bogner along with the Michigan Medical Marijuana Association and Michael Komorn, we have assembled a massive amount of peer-reviewed medical research and government data to show that these conditions should be approved to protect patients, caregivers and physicians from arrest for the medical use of marijuana to treat their conditions. This project took months of work. Reading, organizing, searching and collecting thousands of pages of research from all over the world. Including the most up to date medical studies, peer-reviewed patient surveys and the national reviews of all medical marijuana studies by the National Academies of Science. The oldest peer-reviewed medical research paper cited within these petitions was from the first volume of The Lancet in 1889. Birch EA. The use of Indian hemp in the treatment of chronic chloral and chronic opium poisoning. The Lancet. 1889;133:625. Cannabis, Indian Hemp, Marijuana, whatever you call it, physicians were using this non-toxic plant in 1889 to treat chronic opium poisoning and opium addiction. As opioid based prescriptions are addicting and killing approximately 142 Americans each day in 2017, medical marijuana is a non-lethal non-toxic way to avoid "America enduring a death toll equal to September 11th every three weeks." The qualifying condition petitions were based primarily on the following: Already approved qualifying conditions in other medical marijuana states. Historical and ancient medical books. Patient self-reports and surveys. US Government Department of Health and Human Services Patent on using marijuana to treat many diseases and injuries, including brain injury on humans. Institute of Medicine 1999 report on medical marijuana. This report was the basis for the MMMA, specifically cited within the Michigan law, MCL 333.26422 (b). National Academies of Science (formerly the Institute of Medicine) 2017 updated report on medical marijuana. Included research not only supports each qualifying condition petition, but also answers questions that the LARA directors, physicians and medical marijuana review panel board members had asked of past petitioners. Reports on dosages, safety profiles of marijuana, statistics from the CDC and Poison Control, and information from NIH, FDA and the DEA are presented in the petitions. This information was included in order to compare the safety, effects and side-effects of medical marijuana with FDA approved prescription medications. All of the patients, caregivers, researchers, the Michigan Medical Marijuana Association and it's president Michael Komorn fully agree that marijuana should be removed from the Controlled Substances Act. Marijuana should continue to be studied as a treatment for every human and animal disease. Marijuana also should be submitted to the FDA for approval as a medicine. We fully support all clinical trials related to using marijuana as a treatment for any condition, disease or injury. As all of the scientific peer-reviewed published clinical trials show, marijuana is an effective medicine. The http://www.nih.gov website was heavily utilized throughout this project for locating scientific peer-reviewed published research, reports and information. The petitions are grouped by similar conditions, symptoms or mechanisms of treatment. Included in this post are some choice quotes from a few studies in each group of petitions. 001.-Anxiety.pdf 004.-depression.pdf 007.-Obsessive-compulsive-disorder.pdf 008.-panic-attacks.pdf 011.-Schizophrenia.pdf 012.-Social-Anxiety-Disorder.pdf Marijuana and Medicine Assessing the Science Base 1999 report from the Institute of Medicine https://directorsblog.nih.gov/2014/04/10/anxiety-reduction-exploring-the-role-of-cannabinoid-receptors/ Medical Cannabis in Arizona: Patient Characteristics, Perceptions, and Impressions of Medical Cannabis Legalization. 014.-arthritis.pdf 023.-Rheumatoid-Arthritis.pdf Preliminary assessment of the efficacy, tolerability and safety of a cannabis-based medicine (Sativex) inthe treatment of pain caused by rheumatoid arthritis Transdermal cannabidiol reduces inflammation and pain-related behaviours in a rat model of arthritis 025.-brain-injury.pdf 030.-Treatment-of-spinal-cord-injury.pdf 031.-asthma.pdf Effects of smoked marijuana in experimentally induced asthma. Effects of cannabis on lung function: a population-based cohort study Newspaper ad from 1876 selling marijuana cigarettes for treating asthma. You may laugh at a marijuana cigarette as a real medical treatment, but marijuana is a verified bronchodilator similar in strength to albuterol, the standard asthma medication. The medical efficacy of this specific brand of Asthma cigarettes were specifically exempted within the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs as created by the United Nations. This means these marijuana cigarettes were still able to be sold after each country banned marijuana. https://www.unodc.org/unodc/en/data-and-analysis/bulletin/bulletin_1951-01-01_4_page002.html https://www.unodc.org/unodc/en/data-and-analysis/bulletin/bulletin_1962-01-01_4_page005.html 036.-diabetes.pdf The Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids The Current State of Evidence and Recommendations for Research (2017) The Impact of Marijuana Use on Glucose, Insulin, and Insulin Resistance among US Adults 044.-colitis.pdf 050.-gastric-ulcer.pdf 055.-Inflammatory-bowel-disease-IBD.pdf 064.-Ulcerative-colitis.pdf Marijuana Use Patterns Among Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease Minnesota Medical Cannabis Program: Patient Experiences from the First Program Year by the MN Department of Health 2016. Cannabinoids and the Urinary Bladder Cannabinoids and gastrointestinal motility: Animal and human studies Medical cannabis – the Canadian perspective Impact of cannabis treatment on the quality of life, weight and clinical disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease patients: a pilot prospective study. 106.-organ-transplant.pdf https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4541500/ Medical Marijuana and Organ Transplantation: Drug of Abuse, or Medical Necessity? 107.-Non-severe-and-non-chronic-Pain.pdf https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3998228/ LARA statistics show the majority of the 250,000+ patients in the MMMA are using cannabis to treat chronic pain. As we know that the medical use of marijuana can treat “severe and chronic pain” already, it can and should be used to treat regular generic pain that is not severe and chronic. The reports and information from the Minnesota Department of Health on its medical marijuana program are very detailed and informative about patients experiences with medical marijuana. Minnesota Medical Cannabis Program: Patient Experiences from the First Program Year by the MN Department of Health 2016. http://www.health.state.mn.us/topics/cannabis/about/appendixa.pdf 108.-Parkinsons.pdf Other states already approve of medical marijuana for Parkinson's Disease. Including: Georgia, Vermont, Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Ohio, New Mexico, New York, Pennsylvania, West Virginia and California http://www.google.com/patents/US6630507 111.-Tourette's-Syndromequalifying.pdf Tourette’s Syndrome is an approved medical marijuana qualifying condition in Arkansas, Illinois, Minnesota and Ohio. While the MMMA covers persistant and severe Muscle Spasms, Tourette's Syndrome sufferers may not have the severe symptoms that qualify. The 1999 Institute of Medicine report states that marijuana can be used to treat Tourettes Syndrome. 112.-MMRP-Autism-Petition-2qualifying.pdf Pennsylvania Medical Marijuana Program lists Autism as a qualifying condition. There are two clinical trials for Autism and cannabis in 2017: Cannabinoids for Behavioral Problems in Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Double Blind, Randomized, Placebo-controlled Trial With Crossover. Cannabidivarin (CBDV) vs. Placebo in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) https://nccih.nih.gov/health/autism https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5473390/ Safety and Efficacy of Medical Cannabis Oil for Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia: An-Open Label, Add-On, Pilot Study. An Open Label Study of the Use of Dronabinol (Marinol) in the Management of Treatment-Resistant Self-Injurious Behavior in 10 Retarded Adolescent Patients https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4648553/ DOWNLOAD ALL PETITIONS ONLY (34MB) DOWNLOAD ALL PETITIONS AND SUPPORTING STUDIES HERE (1.7GB)
  8. 2 points
    Highlander

    Member card address

    No. The card has your mailing address. The forms do not ask for the address of the grow. I and several others on this website have used PO boxes for our mailing address many times without an issue.
  9. 2 points
    Restorium2

    Bud porn !

    Nice calyxes!
  10. 2 points
    t-pain

    Just starting medicinal

    vaping has a different effect than smoking. medibles are different than both vape/smoke. there are multiple ways to try marijuana: start slow with eating marijuana an hour or two before bed. small amounts. you can build up a tolerance to the effects over time and then just maintain pain by dosing each day. vape pens, but i prefer whip vaporizers or volcano vaporizers because you can use flower. there are vape pens which can use flower, i am not sure which ones are the best. i just eat the raw flower buds. about the size of a peanut m&m does the trick for me overnight. if you make your own edibles, be sure to cook the marijuana first, this activates and converts the THCA into THC. smoking/vaping both heat up the marijuana to convert THCA to THC. there are also topicals and balms. these work great for various skin conditions. less so for pain. remember marijuana is still illegal and the smell is what gives you away. try to not smell like fresh marijuana or marijuana smoke. this simple trick will keep you out of trouble 99% of the time. next, never speak to the police. never answer questions to the police. besides your name and drivers license of course, be polite but ask to leave or ask to speak with your lawyer. this will keep you out of trouble 70% of the time. if you can, grow your own. its a fun hobby and can yield cheaper medicine than dispensaries. feel free to ask more questions. good luck!
  11. 2 points
    Kingdiamond

    Bud porn !

  12. 2 points
    Yeah 96 hours of darkness could stress them causing possible hermies .
  13. 2 points
    I'd be afraid to leave them in the dark for 4 days. I spend the last week of flowering trimming off sugar leaves, while keeping a close eye for bugs and mold.
  14. 2 points
  15. 2 points
    Pregnancy and Medical Marijuana Expectant mothers are searching for answers about the safety profile of Medical Marijuana. Unfortunately the scientific community has dropped the ball and kicked it off the cliff on this issue. The lack of scientific research is due to marijuana’s illegality. Further, there exist huge biases within the published research. Mostly the research confounds marijuana use with tobacco and/or alcohol, two known causes of fetus and child harm. Separating out marijuana effects from the self-reported research on mothers who also smoke tobacco and drink alcohol is impossible. Likewise no pregnant women are signing up for research studies due to the illegality of marijuana and CPS removing children from mothers for testing positive for marijuana use. Many organizations quote from other organizations, who quote from other studies and reviews. The Minnesota Department of Health OFFICE OF MEDICAL CANNABIS quotes from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Committee report: In the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists official committee opinion, interim update Oct 2017, the committee found: Uninformed opinion, with zero evidence and lots of fear, uncertainty and doubt (FUD) are used to scare mothers away from a nontoxic plant. These uninformed unscientific opinions are being used by lawmakers to craft laws continuing the cycle of FUD and the illegality of marijuana. “Oh we don’t know what marijuana does, so let’s treat it like heroin” and “if anyone questions our opinion of marijuana, we’ll call them dirty lazy pothead stoner hippies” or “puppets of the marijuana industry”. But we do know what marijuana does. One cannot live in a bubble and ignore reality and the world around us. Women smoke and eat marijuana while pregnant. Cannabis use during pregnancy in France in 2010 Trends in Self-reported and Biochemically Tested Marijuana Use Among Pregnant Females in California From 2009-2016 http://news.gallup.com/poll/194195/adults-say-smoke-marijuana.aspx Much of the opinions on marijuana are tainted by a small number of poorly designed studies on marijuana. For example, the National Institute of Health gives grants to researchers through NIDA, the National Institute of Drug Abuse, to study marijuana. NIDA’s focus is on drug abuse, so 90% of its grants are for studies on marijuana abuse, not marijuana benefits. When you ignore half of your research, you ignore science. Many of these studies are completed in order to get future grants from NIDA; research is often conducted from the conclusion backwards in order to show some kind of harm from marijuana use. This, in of itself, does not bias research. https://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/19/health/policy/19marijuana.html The bias is introduced when researchers are rushed and forced to publish results, even if the studies were deficient. For example, every website and newspaper ran with the story about marijuana using children lose IQ points. Not many reported on the follow-up study that could not replicate the first study. When eliminating co-founders, the new study found no drop in IQ points. Further, research on twin siblings showed that the drop in IQ was due to parenting, binge drinking or other societal influences, not marijuana. https://www.drugabuse.gov/news-events/nida-notes/2016/08/study-questions-role-marijuana-in-teen-users-iq-decline Try reading that last sentence again. In a world of science, evidence, reasoning and logic, a doctor makes a statement that decades of use of marijuana might make you lose intellectual function, based on conjecture. NIDA also continues to perpetuate the myth that Marijuana is a “gateway drug”. https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/research-reports/marijuana/marijuana-gateway-drug These findings are consistent with the idea of marijuana as a "gateway drug." However, the majority of people who use marijuana do not go on to use other, "harder" substances. NIDA, NIH, FDA, DEA, including other federal, state, and local government organizations and private companies continue to perpetuate these and other lies in order to keep marijuana illegal. ASA has filed complaints against the DEA multiple times to get it to remove incorrect statements about marijuana off of the DEA’s website. http://www.safeaccessnow.org/iqa_victory A cyclical pattern emerges from the current and past situation surrounding marijuana. 1. Stymied scientific research, due to illegality of marijuana and government funding biases 2. Using stymied scientific research as a reason to ignore reality. 3. Repeating the biased scientific research, long after it was shown to be deficient. 4. Using the deficient biased research in “meta-reviews”. Thus taking bad science as a base to create more bad science just by doing an analysis of the bad science conclusions. 5. Even after a research study has been fully proven to be deficient and conflicting with better research, continue to hold it up as if it is still valid in some way. 6. Publish opinions as if they were facts, without any data to back up any claims. Continue reading for more conflicting studies and more calls for research. Marijuana: Prenatal and Postnatal Exposure in the Human Marijuana use in pregnancy and lactation: a review of the evidence Marijuana and Pregnancy The Association of Marijuana Use with Outcome of Pregnancy Prenatal Tobacco, Marijuana, Stimulant, and Opiate Exposure: Outcomes and Practice Implications Many of these studies contradict themselves. Some report differences in birth weight, some show no differences. Read the studies yourself! http://legislature.mi.gov/doc.aspx?2017-HB-5222 House bill 5422 will force MMFLA provisioning centers to give patients and caregivers an unscientific pamphlet, as described by the legislature. HB 5222 looks like it will pass. All this fear and doubt of a non-toxic 5,000+ year old medication used by millions of humans in every country in the world.
  16. 2 points
    The problem is with "free" meds. This has been the case for years. There are mostly only four reasons why some CGs offer free meds: 1. You're close friends or family, and the CG is a super nice guy (or gal). 2. The CG is trying out a huge number of new strains and wants more plants to facilitate this. (This really doesn't happen very often). 3. The CG is growing more than his/her patients need and selling overages illegally. (Do you want a CG going around with YOUR MMJ card/info if he/she is the sort of person taking big legal risks?) 4. The CG is inexperienced and willing to promise free meds to try to get patients. Medical MJ is no different than the rest of life. If someone offers you something for nothing, you need to dig deep and figure out what the real cost is and if that's something you want to be involved with. This concept of free meds has disappointed many patients. You have to ask yourself why a complete stranger would offer MJ for free. You also should know that at least some CGs (I've witnessed this first hand) pay certification clinics a fee when a new patient is referred and signs up. Going back to 2009, the most successful relationships I've had (as a CG) with patients are 1.) Family, 2.) Friends, 3.) Referral from family or friends (counting my patients as friends as it usually works out that way) and 4.) This website. If I were in your shoes, I'd use the link the previous poster put up, send in the form removing the CG and send a copy certified mail to the CG....and get started with the new search. Unless you have someone in mind already, I'd start on this website in the classifieds section. There are several members/CGs here who have been active on these forums for a long time and have built some credability. Good luck. And yeah, that bud you posted a pic of is absolute garbage.
  17. 2 points
    Years ago, I posted a study I found that was done on women- infants- and children in Jamaica; of course I can't find it now. There was no mention of any adverse effects. It the time, I'd asked an Ob/Gyn her opinion of cannabis use and pregnancy. She mentioned that cannabis had been used by woman around the world for hundreds of years and that the babies born were no more sick or crazy than ant other baby. She did stress that because of the laws in this country she would not recommend and would in fact discourage her patients cannabis use.
  18. 2 points
    It doesn't matter. You give LARA your mailing address - not the address of your grow. You can even use a PO Box. I did that for years for a variety of reasons, not the least of which was if I lost a card I didn't want a street address on it.
  19. 2 points
    A quarter pound for Xmas? That's what I'm talking about! I wish my sisters were like that. Beats the pickles, salsa, and jam I get. But it's the thought that counts.
  20. 2 points
    Restorium2

    New laws big business

    Quality will always rule. It's all that really matters after the hyp, free grams and pre rolls. It's never about the hat, it's always about the cattle ......
  21. 2 points
    Wild Bill

    New laws big business

    I believe that there will always be a place for caregivers. Those who truly need cannabis for medical reasons will be priced out of the recreational market because of all the taxes and mark ups on the product. I've also been noticing that the black market is thriving in the states where they have legalized because the legal shops can't beat the black market price. Those caregivers who grow in order to help their patients will do just fine. Those who think that they're on their way to riches will be greatly disappointed.
  22. 2 points
    Kingdiamond

    New laws big business

    There is nothing that ive seen or heard that will affect a caregiver from continuing to grow for their patients.
  23. 1 point
    How Seniors Joined the Cannabis Craze Posted by CN Staff on April 20, 2018 at 10:03:50 PT By Sara Davidson Source: New Yorker Magazine USA -- On a sunny afternoon last August, a dozen women from Balfour Senior Living, in Louisville, Colorado, boarded a bus for a field trip to a marijuana dispensary. One used a walker, one was hooked up to an oxygen tank, and another wore a linen suit and jewelry. All were told to wear hats while walking from the bus to the dispensary door. “The sun is our enemy,” one said. Joan Stammerjohn, who is eighty-four, said she’d joined the group because she’s had chronic pain in her legs, and has been on OxyContin for ten years. “I’d like to get off it,” she said. Others said they had ailments like arthritis or back pain, but didn’t want to disclose their names because they believe marijuana is still stigmatized. “We’re travelling incognito,” one said. “I’m excited. I came to open my mind—I want to know the latest things. I hope this won’t be in the paper, though. We’ll have a crowd coming to Balfour, thinking this is the coolest place.” Filing inside the Ajoya dispensary, they were overwhelmed by display cases filled with pills, tinctures, edibles, jars of green flower clumps, vape pens, oils, patches, and creams. As they listened to budtenders suggest what to use for pain, arthritis, or sleep, a ninety-two-year-old bowed her head and slowly, slowly, started slumping against the counter. “Are you all right?” I asked. She fainted to the floor. A staff member knelt beside her as she regained consciousness. Paramedics arrived, but a half hour later, the woman, smiling, walked out the door with a hundred and twenty dollars worth of products. Seniors are America’s fastest-growing population of new cannabis users. Ten thousand people turn sixty-five each day, according to the Pew Research Center, and more and more are trying the drug for their health and well-being. Even conservative politicians are warming to the idea. John Boehner, the sixty-eight-year-old former Speaker of the House, who in 2011 said he was “unalterably opposed” to the legalization of marijuana, recently made news by announcing that he was joining the board of Acreage Holdings, which distributes cannabis across eleven states. His “thinking on cannabis” had “evolved,” he tweeted. In Louisville, the week before the field trip, there had been a lecture at Balfour by Joseph Cohen, D.O., the founder of Holos Health, which advises people on medical cannabis. The talk drew an overflow crowd of two hundred, with people standing against walls and spilling into the hallway. “The first thing older folks say when they enter our office is, ‘I don’t want to get high,’ ” Cohen said. He explained that there are two primary compounds in cannabis: THC, which is psychoactive, and CBD, which is not. “So CBD is a great solution for elders,” he said. “I took a little CBD before this talk, to make sure I stay calm.” Cohen is seventy-one, with a long, gray ponytail and a beard. He recommends CBD for age-related diseases, such as Parkinson’s, dementia, osteoarthritis, and chronic inflammation. “CBD has twenty times the anti-inflammatory power of aspirin and two times the power of steroids,” he said. Since cannabis is federally illegal, none of his claims—or those made by any other clinician—can be supported by double-blind studies on humans, the gold standard in medical science. But in February a peer-reviewed study of almost three thousand patients in Israel, the first of its kind, showed that cannabis can be safe and effective for seniors, and lead to decreased use of pharmaceuticals, including opioids. In the study, published in the European Journal of Internal Medicine, almost ninety-four per cent of patients reported improvement in their condition, with their pain level reduced by half. For Cohen, who practiced obstetrics and gynecology for thirty years, such results speak to the power of the endocannabinoid system, which regulates many body processes, such as nerve signalling, reproduction, and the immune system. “When I went to medical school, we didn’t know about the endocannabinoid system,” he said. “We knew about THC because we’d light up between classes.” The audience laughed. “We’re wired for this plant,” he continued. He explained that the body makes endocannabinoids—chemicals similar to THC and CBD—which lock onto receptors found throughout the body, especially in the brain. “Receptors are not found in the body because there is a plant out there that will trigger them,” Raphael Mechoulam, the Israeli biochemist who discovered THC, in 1964, said. “Receptors are present because the body makes compounds that activate them.” Two major groups of seniors are turning to cannabis. The first, like the women on the field trip, have never tried marijuana and are drawn to its alleged health benefits. The second are boomers who “smoked dope” in the sixties and seventies, giving it up when they became focussed on careers or raising kids. An attorney I know in Los Angeles, who didn’t want his name disclosed, recently returned to the drug after developing acute pain in his joints. At seventy-one, he was diagnosed with polymyalgia rheumatica, an inflammatory autoimmune disease. His doctor put him on prednisone. This decreased the pain but had unpleasant side effects, including insomnia, and required him to give up his passion for fine wine. When he began hearing that CBD was anti-inflammatory, he secured a medical license and went to a dispensary. “I was shocked,” he said. “The last time I was smoking grass, you bought a baggie filled with sticks and seeds from some shady character.” At the dispensary, he saw products labelled with the names of strains and the percentages of THC and CBD they contained. “The twenty-something budtenders became my sommeliers,” he said. “They’re as knowledgeable as wine stewards at the best L.A. restaurants.” He found a strain, Bubba Kush, that helped him sleep, and gradually started experimenting with other strains, finding new and enjoyable effects. Another boomer I talked to is a former high-school art teacher, in Boulder, who wanted to try CBD for anxiety. After receiving strains with high amounts of the chemical from her daughter, in Seattle—Colorado growers were breeding the plant to increase THC instead—she started making her own oil from the plant. Her kitchen looked like a scene from “Breaking Bad.” (“Breaking Bud,” as she put it.) The oil relieved her anxiety, and she shared it with friends, asking them to report their responses. One said it improved her arthritis; another said it helped with acid reflux. About forty per cent felt no effect. This confirmed what’s generally acknowledged: people respond differently to the same sample of cannabis. “You have to be your own chemistry set,” she said. Cannabis’s appeal isn’t universal; it's still stigmatized in some communities. Sue Taylor, a seventy-year-old retired Catholic-school principal, never smoked pot while raising her three sons, and many in her Oakland community, she said, saw it as “a hardcore drug that got their young men in jail.” The incarceration rate of African-Americans for drug charges is nearly six times that of whites, despite a similar rate of drug use. When one of Taylor’s sons called to say he was studying at Oaksterdam University, which offers training for the cannabis industry, she flew to Oakland to “save him from drugs.” But she was persuaded of pot’s medical value after doing some research, visiting senior care homes, and working at Harborside dispensary, where she saw patients’ conditions improve after cannabis treatment. Taylor is now a commissioner on aging in Alameda County, and said she is one of two people in California certified to train physicians and nurses in medical cannabis. She speaks at churches and senior centers. “In the beginning, they’ll sit, frowning, with their arms folded across their chests,” she said. “I tell them I’m not trying to convince anyone, I’m only here to educate you about the health benefits.” This summer, she plans to open iCANN Berkeley, a dispensary and wellness center, in a historically black neighborhood, which will cater to seniors. “Seniors are the most vulnerable population we have,” she said. “People think they can give them a pill and not worry if it’s gonna kill them because they’re almost dead anyway.” For Taylor, polypharmacy—the prescription of multiple drugs—is an urgent issue. “Most seniors we see are taking fifteen to twenty-six pills a day,” she said, adding that this can start with something as simple as a consultation for high blood pressure. “The doctor gives them a pill for it, which causes the thyroid to go out. The thyroid pill causes the liver to go out. The liver pill makes your pancreas go out of whack, and the list goes on,” she said. “Most important, the patients are not getting better. They’re getting worse and worse.” Six months after the Balfour field trip, I contacted some of the participants to see how they’d fared. Leslie Brown, who suffers from insomnia, said she tried one pill. “I gave it a shot and it didn’t help me sleep, so I didn’t take any more,” she said. Her husband, Ira, who has neuropathy, said he tried a gummy bear two times and “it had no effect.” When I reported this to Cohen, he said that “people have to realize that you sometimes you have to wake up your receptors. You have to try it several times. And not everything works for everybody, anyway.” When I told this to Leslie, she was silent. “Maybe I’ll try it again,” she said. “It would be nice to have a good night’s sleep.”
  24. 1 point
    Easy E

    Member card address

    PO BOX here too. ; )
  25. 1 point
    The Michigan Medical Marijuana Association has submitted a petition for treating opioid dependence with medical marijuana. The public hearing for public comments will be heard on April 27, 2018. Read more about it at http://komornlaw.com/petitions Pa. approves sale of marijuana 'flower,' and will allow cannabis to treat opioid addiction Updated: APRIL 16, 2018 — 5:58 PM EDT by Sam Wood, Staff Writer @samwoodiii | samwood@phillynews.com The price of medical marijuana could fall dramatically for some patients by mid-summer. And the drug will soon be used to treat opioid withdrawal in Pennsylvania, which will become the second state after New Jersey to allow it for that purpose. At a news conference in Harrisburg, Secretary of Health Rachel Levine said she had approved the sale of cannabis flower, the traditional smokable or vaporizable form of the plant. “It’s another tool,” Levine said. “The whole idea of this program is to provide another tool in the toolbox of physicians to treat these conditions.” Since the launch of the state medical marijuana program in February, dispensaries in Pennsylvania have sold only pricey marijuana oils and extracts. Flower, also known as leaf or bud, needs no processing and is less expensive to produce. “For some patients, the cost of their medical marijuana could drop by 50 percent with the addition of flower,” said Chris Visco, owner of TerraVida Holistic Centers, a chain of dispensaries with shops in Sellersville and Abington. “It offers the lowest price per milligram of THC, the active ingredient.” Marijuana producer Charlie Bachtell, CEO of Cresco Yeltrah, said being able to sell plant material will streamline a large part of his production. “We just have to weigh it and put it in a container,” he said. “There’s no manual labor turning it into something else, whether it’s filling a capsule or filling a vape pen. Every time someone touches it, it makes it more expensive.” Though smoking cannabis is prohibited by Pennsylvania law, the difference between lighting up and vaporization is literally a matter of degrees. Vaporizing requires less intense heat and a specialized electronic device so that the marijuana doesn’t combust, but the method delivers the same psychoactive and physical effects as smoking. (To discourage smoking, dispensaries are forbidden from vending pipes, bongs and rolling papers.) Nearly all of the 29 states that have legalized marijuana in some form allow for the distribution of plant material. Minnesota and West Virginia are among the last weed-legal states with laws banning its sale. Levine accepted more than a dozen recommendations made last week by the state’s medical marijuana advisory board. With her decision, doctors will still need to register but will be able to opt out of the published registry. Terminal illness, neurodegenerative diseases, and dyskinetic and spastic movement disorders are now qualifying conditions. Allowing the use of cannabis to help wean people off of opioids may have the greatest impact on the state. New Jersey was the first to approve “addiction substitute therapy for opioid reduction” last month. By adding treatment for opioid withdrawal to the list of approved uses, Levine opened up the possibility for clinical research on the two drugs at state health systems. “This is major news,” said physician Sue Sisley, founder of the Scottsdale Research Institute, where she researches medical marijuana’s effects on PTSD in veterans. “We have all these opioid task forces in so many states, and almost none of them even mention cannabis as a substitution for opioids as part of the treatment strategy.” Sisley called Levine’s decision “courageous” but warned it could be politically “radioactive.” “It’s a very conservative medical environment you have in Pennsylvania,” said Sisley, who serves on the steering committee of Jefferson’s Lambert Center for the Study of Medicinal Cannabis and Hemp in Philadelphia. “But Dr. Levine recognizes she needs to solve the problem and start preventing all these deaths that are all so preventable.” Advocates applauded the evolution of the state marijuana program. “I am ecstatic today,” said State Sen. Daylin Leach (D., Montgomery), who helped drive the legislation that became the state’s medical marijuana law. “Allowing the whole plant will dramatically expand the number of patients who benefit from medical cannabis and will go a long way toward guaranteeing that this huge new industry survives and prospers.” Becky Dansky, legislative counsel of the Marijuana Policy Project, said that allowing the sale of flower represented more than a cheaper option for patients, many of whom are on disability. “For many patients, it’s the best form to treat their symptoms,” Dansky said. “The key now is to get it on the shelves as soon as possible.” http://www.philly.com/philly/business/cannabis/marijuana-medical-flower-opioid-addiction-therapy-rachel-levine-cresco-terravida-20180416.html
  26. 1 point
    Kingdiamond

    Member card address

    Yeah all of my cards have a po box so no its not a requirement .
  27. 1 point
    mibrains

    Posting Clean Pictures Online

    so i was asking and then was also asked by a community member about the security of the data attached to pictures posted online. i found this excellent information site with directions and links for free data removal. http://www.labnol.org/software/remove-photograph-metadata/19588/ i tested the windows explorer - properties - details idea and i was able to clean all the personal identifying information imbedded in the photo. An Alternative Way to Remove EXIF Information If the photographs are in one folder, you can easily remove the EXIF data from one or more of these photographs using Windows Explorer itself without requiring any additional software. Select all the images files, right click and choose Properties. Now hit the Details tab and click on the “Remove Properties and Personal Information” link. The next screen will give you an option to remove the various metadata that is embedded inside the pictures. Simple. i highly recommend anyone who uploads photos to the WWW cleanse them of any personally identifiable information.. particularly if your posting pictures of cannabis. hope this helps..
  28. 1 point
    t-pain

    Cancer Fighter in Search of Indica

    I am not a caregiver. Just trying to help other caregivers get the info they need to connect with you (do you have a card, and what city/area you are in, which you answered).
  29. 1 point
    115th Congress (2017-2018) Marijuana and Drug Related Legislative Acts Current as of 4/11/18 H.R. 1823 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/1823 Marijuana Revenue and Regulation Act Rep. Blumenauer, Earl [D-OR-3] House - Ways and Means 3/30/2017 Referred to the House Committee on Ways and Means. Introduced 3/30/2017 S. 776 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/senate-bill/776 Marijuana Revenue and Regulation Act Sen. Wyden, Ron [D-OR] Senate - Finance 3/30/2017 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Finance. Introduced 3/30/2017 H.R. 1841 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/1841 Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol Act Rep. Polis, Jared [D-CO-2] House - Judiciary, Energy and Commerce, Ways and Means, Natural Resources, Agriculture 4/24/2017 Referred to the Subcommittee on Conservation and Forestry. Introduced 3/30/2017 H.R. 3391 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/3391 Medical Marijuana Research Act of 2017 Rep. Harris, Andy [R-MD-1] House - Energy and Commerce, Judiciary 9/6/2017 Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations. 7/25/2017 S. 780 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/senate-bill/780 Responsibly Addressing the Marijuana Policy Gap Act of 2017 Sen. Wyden, Ron [D-OR] Senate - Finance 3/30/2017 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Finance. Introduced 3/30/2017 H.R. 1824 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/1824 Responsibly Addressing the Marijuana Policy Gap Act of 2017 Rep. Blumenauer, Earl [D-OR-3] House - Judiciary, Energy and Commerce, Ways and Means, Financial Services, Natural Resources, Education and the Workforce, Veterans' Affairs, Oversight and Government Reform 4/24/2017 Referred to the Subcommittee on Immigration and Border Security. Introduced 3/30/2017 H.R. 4815 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/4815 Marijuana Justice Act of 2018 Rep. Lee, Barbara [D-CA-13] House - Judiciary, Energy and Commerce, Agriculture, Natural Resources, Financial Services 2/8/2018 Referred to the Subcommittee on Conservation and Forestry. Introduced 1/17/2018 S. 1689 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/senate-bill/1689 Marijuana Justice Act of 2017 Sen. Booker, Cory A. [D-NJ] Senate - Judiciary 8/1/2017 Read twice and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. Introduced 8/1/2017 H.R. 331 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/331 States' Medical Marijuana Property Rights Protection Act Rep. Lee, Barbara [D-CA-13] House - Judiciary, Energy and Commerce 1/31/2017 Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations. Introduced 1/5/2017 H.R. 1227 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/1227 Ending Federal Marijuana Prohibition Act of 2017 Rep. Garrett, Thomas A., Jr. [R-VA-5] House - Energy and Commerce, Judiciary 3/16/2017 Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations. Introduced 2/27/2017 H.R. 2020 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/2020 To provide for the rescheduling of marijuana into schedule III of the Controlled Substances Act. Rep. Gaetz, Matt [R-FL-1] House - Energy and Commerce, Judiciary 4/7/2017 Referred to the Subcommittee on Health Introduced 4/6/2017 H.R. 975 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/975 Respect State Marijuana Laws Act of 2017 Rep. Rohrabacher, Dana [R-CA-48] House - Judiciary, Energy and Commerce 2/10/2017 Referred to the Subcommittee on Health. Introduced 2/7/2017 H.R. 4816 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/4816 Stop Civil Asset Forfeiture Funding for Marijuana Suppression Act of 2018 Rep. Lieu, Ted [D-CA-33] House - Judiciary 1/24/2018 Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations. Introduced 1/17/2018 H.R. 2920 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/2920 CARERS Act of 2017 Rep. Cohen, Steve [D-TN-9] House - Energy and Commerce, Judiciary, Veterans' Affairs 6/16/2017 Referred to the Subcommittee on Health. Introduced 6/15/2017 S. 1374 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/senate-bill/1374 CARERS Act of 2017 Sen. Booker, Cory A. [D-NJ] Senate - Judiciary 6/15/2017 Read twice and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. Introduced 6/15/2017 S. 1764 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/senate-bill/1764 CARERS Act of 2017 Sen. Booker, Cory A. [D-NJ] Senate - Judiciary 9/5/2017 Read twice and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary Introduced 9/5/2017 H.R. 1820 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/1820 Veterans Equal Access Act Rep. Blumenauer, Earl [D-OR-3] House - Veterans' Affairs 3/31/2017 Referred to the Subcommittee on Health. Introduced 3/30/2017 H.R. 1810 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/1810 Small Business Tax Equity Act of 2017 Rep. Curbelo, Carlos [R-FL-26] House - Ways and Means 3/30/2017 Referred to the House Committee on Ways and Means. Introduced 3/30/2017 S. 777 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/senate-bill/777 Small Business Tax Equity Act of 2017 Sen. Wyden, Ron [D-OR] Senate - Finance 3/30/2017 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Finance. Introduced 3/30/2017 H.R. 3534 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/3534 State Marihuana And Regulatory Tolerance Enforcement Act Rep. DelBene, Suzan K. [D-WA-1] House - Judiciary, Energy and Commerce 8/4/2017 Referred to the Subcommittee on Health. Introduced 7/28/2017 H.R. 4825 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/4825 MEDS Act Rep. Bishop, Rob [R-UT-1] House - Energy and Commerce, Judiciary 1/24/2018 Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations. Introduced 1/18/2018 S. 1803 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/senate-bill/1803 MEDS Act Sen. Hatch, Orrin G. [R-UT] Senate - Judiciary 9/13/2017 Read twice and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. Introduced 9/13/2017 S. 1008 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/senate-bill/1008 Therapeutic Hemp Medical Access Act of 2017 Sen. Gardner, Cory [R-CO] Senate - Judiciary 5/2/2017 Read twice and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. Introduced 5/2/2017 H.R. 3252 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/3252 Second Chance for Students Act Rep. Foster, Bill [D-IL-11] House - Education and the Workforce 7/14/2017 Referred to the House Committee on Education and the Workforce. Introduced 7/14/2017 H.R. 5050 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/5050 Sensible Enforcement of Cannabis Act of 2018 Rep. Correa, J. Luis [D-CA-46] House - Judiciary 2/15/2018 Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations Introduced 2/15/2018 H.R. 2273 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/2273 Charlotte's Web Medical Access Act of 2017 Rep. Perry, Scott [R-PA-4] House - Energy and Commerce, Judiciary, Financial Services 6/2/2017 Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations. Introduced 5/1/2017 H.Res. 590 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-resolution/590 Calling on the Secretary of Veterans Affairs to conduct a clinical study assessing the effectiveness of treating chronic pain in veterans with cannabis in comparison to opioids. Rep. Correa, J. Luis [D-CA-46] House - Veterans' Affairs 10/26/2017 Referred to the Subcommittee on Health. Introduced 10/26/2017 H.R. 715 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/715 Compassionate Access Act Rep. Griffith, H. Morgan [R-VA-9] House - Energy and Commerce, Judiciary 2/14/2017 Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations. 1/27/2017 H.R. 714 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/714 LUMMA Rep. Griffith, H. Morgan [R-VA-9] House - Energy and Commerce 2/3/2017 Referred to the Subcommittee on Health. Introduced 1/27/2017 S. 1276 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/senate-bill/1276 Cannabidiol Research Expansion Act Sen. Feinstein, Dianne [D-CA] Senate - Judiciary 5/25/2017 Read twice and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. Introduced 5/25/2017 H.R. 2528 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/2528 Respect States' and Citizens' Rights Act of 2017 Rep. DeGette, Diana [D-CO-1] House - Judiciary, Energy and Commerce 6/23/2017 Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations. Introduced 5/18/2017 H.R. 449 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/449 Synthetic Drug Awareness Act of 2017 Rep. Jeffries, Hakeem S. [D-NY-8] House - Energy and Commerce 1/25/2017 Referred to the Subcommittee on Health. Introduced 1/11/2017 H.R. 2900 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/2900 Synthetic Drug Prevention, Treatment, and Education Act Rep. Velazquez, Nydia M. [D-NY-7] House - Energy and Commerce 6/16/2017 Referred to the Subcommittee on Health. Introduced 6/14/2017 H.Con.Res. 97 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-concurrent-resolution/97 Directing the Clerk of the House of Representatives to make corrections in the enrollment of H.R. 1. Rep. Polis, Jared [D-CO-2] House - Ways and Means, House Administration 12/18/2017 Referred to the Committee on Ways and Means, and in addition to the Committee on House Administration, for a period to be subsequently determined by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of such provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the committee concerned. Introduced 12/18/2017 S.Res. 83 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/senate-resolution/83 A resolution expressing the sense of the Senate regarding the trafficking of illicit fentanyl into the United States from Mexico and China. Sen. Markey, Edward J. [D-MA] Senate - Foreign Relations 3/15/2017 Resolution agreed to in Senate without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. Introduced 3/8/2017 H.Res. 572 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-resolution/572 Supporting the goals and ideals of Red Ribbon Week during the period of October 23 through October 31, 2017. Rep. Kuster, Ann M. [D-NH-2] House - Energy and Commerce 10/13/2017 Referred to the Subcommittee on Health. 10/12/2017 S.Res. 10 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/senate-resolution/10 A resolution expressing the sense of the Senate regarding the trafficking of illicit fentanyl into the United States from Mexico and China. Sen. Markey, Edward J. [D-MA] 4 Senate - Foreign Relations 1/10/2017 Referred to the Committee on Foreign Relations. Introduced 1/10/2017 H.R. 3096 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/3096 Drug-Free Indian Health Service Act of 2017 Rep. Noem, Kristi L. [R-SD-At Large] House - Natural Resources, Energy and Commerce 7/13/2017 Referred to the Subcommittee on Indian, Insular and Alaska Native Affairs. Introduced 6/28/2017 H.Res. 268 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-resolution/268 Expressing the sense of the House of Representatives regarding the trafficking of illicit fentanyl into the United States from Mexico and China. Rep. McKinley, David B. [R-WV-1] House - Foreign Affairs, Judiciary, Energy and Commerce 5/18/2017 Referred to the Subcommittee on the Western Hemisphere. Introduced 4/6/2017 S. 1662 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/senate-bill/1662 Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2018 Sen. Shelby, Richard C. [R-AL] Senate - Appropriations 7/27/2017 Placed on Senate Legislative Calendar under General Orders. Calendar No. 186. Introduced 7/27/2017 H.R. 3647 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/3647 Save America Comprehensive Immigration Act of 2017 Rep. Jackson Lee, Sheila [D-TX-18] House - Judiciary, Homeland Security, Oversight and Government Reform 9/21/2017 Referred to the Subcommittee on Immigration and Border Security. Introduced 8/8/2017 S. 1557 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/senate-bill/1557 Military Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2018 Sen. Moran, Jerry [R-KS] Senate - Appropriations 7/13/2017 Placed on Senate Legislative Calendar under General Orders. Calendar No. 173. Introduced 7/13/2017 H.R. 4261 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/4261 SAFE Justice Ac Rep. Scott, Robert C. "Bobby" [D-VA-3] House - Judiciary, Energy and Commerce 11/21/2017 Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations. Introduced 11/6/2017 H.R. 3280 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/3280 Financial Services and General Government Appropriations Act, 2018 Rep. Graves, Tom [R-GA-14] House - Appropriations 7/26/2017 Committee on Appropriations Senate Subcommittee on Financial Services and General Government. Hearings held on the subject prior to measure being received from the House. Hearings printed: S. Hrg. 115-191. Introduced 7/18/2017 H.R. 244 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/244 Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2017 Rep. Cook, Paul [R-CA-8] House - Veterans' Affairs | Senate - Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions 5/5/2017 Became Public Law No: 115-31. Introduced 1/4/2017 H.R. 1625 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/1625 Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2018 Rep. Royce, Edward R. [R-CA-39] House - Foreign Affairs | Senate - Foreign Relations, Foreign Relations 3/23/2018 Became Public Law No: 115-141. Introduced 3/20/2017 S. 1152 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/senate-bill/1152 SAFE Banking Act Sen. Merkley, Jeff [D-OR] Senate - Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs 6/8/2017 Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs. Hearings held. Hearings printed: S.Hrg. 115-81. Introduced 5/17/2017 H.R. 2215 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/2215 SAFE Act of 2017 Rep. Perlmutter, Ed [D-CO-7] House - Financial Services, Judiciary 9/21/2017 Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations. Introduced 4/27/2017 View PDF Document in Table Format
  30. 1 point
    t-pain

    Renew Time question

    good job calling LARA. never trust anyone except LARA instructions directly. I forgot to tell you to call them. lots of people spreading lots of rumors out there
  31. 1 point
    Kingdiamond

    Just starting medicinal

    Its a trial and error thing if you need a more of a motivational type of effect go with a pure sativa or a sativa dominant strain but im going to tell you what works for one might do nothing for another hence why I made mention of trial and error.
  32. 1 point
    Michigan Orders 210 Medical Marijuana Dispensaries to Close The Associated Press March 29, 2018 (ChrisBoswell/iStock) LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Michigan regulators said Thursday that they ordered the closure of 210 medical marijuana businesses over a two-week period, largely because their owners failed to apply for a state license by a mid-February deadline or did not receive authorization from their municipalities. Most of the shops — 158 — were in Detroit. Authorities also hand-delivered orders to eight businesses in Lansing, seven in Flint, five in Gaylord, three each in Ann Arbor and Battle Creek, and smaller numbers elsewhere. Shops that did not close immediately could be denied a license down the line if they apply, be referred to local, state or federal law enforcement, or face other penalties or sanctions. “If they feel like they received a letter in error, we obviously have an open form of communication with them.” David Harns, Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs “We had our team scour publicly available information to create a list and then we cross-referenced it with those who did turn in applications,” said David Harns, spokesman for the state Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs, which includes the Bureau of Medical Marihuana Regulation. The cease-and-desist orders come as the state continues the process of more tightly regulating the medical cannabis industry under a 2016 law that aimed in part to address confusion surrounding the legality of dispensary shops that opened after voters in 2008 authorized marijuana for medical use. The new law includes a 3 percent tax on provisioning centers. Initial licenses to grow, process, sell, transport or test cannabis will be issued by June 15. RELATED STORY Michigan Shutters 40 Unlicensed Medical Marijuana Businesses Some 215 businesses that submitted a prequalification license application had the appropriate sign-off from a local clerk attesting that they can operate temporarily while awaiting a state license. Harns said the 210 shops that were ordered to close did not apply for a license, applied too late, submitted an application without their municipality’s blessing or possibly filled out some information incorrectly. “If it’s considered an incomplete application, it can possibly be fixed,” he said. “Our team is receiving phone calls from people who have questions about this. … If they feel like they received a letter in error, we obviously have an open form of communication with them.” Roughly 277,000 patients are registered with the state to grow their own cannabis or obtain it from 43,000 registered caregivers who can supply a limited number of people.
  33. 1 point
    It takes a long time to learn every single new word when you enter the marijuana world. Below is a quick attempt by the Detroit Free Press to educate it's readers. https://www.freep.com/story/news/local/michigan/2018/03/30/michigan-medical-marijuana-words/473131002/
  34. 1 point
    A doctor can write you a recommendation to use marijuana, but he/she cannot dictate who you have for your caregiver! If the person you're using as the person who is to provide for you is providing you with crap, drop them. You are not required to have a caregiver. Since you're using a dispensary anyway, pay the $10 and do without. You can always a new one, once a good one is found.
  35. 1 point
    zapatosunidos

    PGT #386 - Chad's Self Awareness

    PGT #386 - Chad's Self Awareness View the full article
  36. 1 point
    No. Definitely not. You can grow at one address of your choosing.
  37. 1 point
    Published on Mar 1, 2018 Muskegon Mother finds non-toxic and safe Cannabidiol CBD from medical marijuana is a better treatment for epilepsy than liquid Valium. In phase 1 of the study, 3 mg/kg daily of cannabidiol (CBD) was given for 30 days to 8 health human volunteers. Another 8 volunteers received the same number of identical capsules containing glucose as placebo in a double-blind setting. Neurological and physical examinations, blood and urine analysis, ECG and EEG were performed at weekly intervals. In phase 2 of the study, 15 patients suffering from secondary generalized epilepsy with temporal focus were randomly divided into two groups. Each patient received, in a double-blind procedure, 200-300 mg daily of CBD or placebo. The drugs were administered for along as 4 1/2 months. Clinical and laboratory examinations, EEG and ECG were performed at 15- or 30-day intervals. Throughout the experiment the patients continued to take the antiepileptic drugs prescribed before the experiment, although these drugs no longer controlled the signs of the disease. All patients and volunteers tolerated CBD very well and no signs of toxicity or serious side effects were detected on examination. 4 of the 8 CBD subjects remained almost free of convulsive crises throughout the experiment and 3 other patients demonstrated partial improvement in their clinical condition. CBD was ineffective in 1 patient. The clinical condition of 7 placebo patients remained unchanged whereas the condition of 1 patient clearly improved. The potential use of CBD as an antiepileptic drug and its possible potentiating effect on other antiepileptic drugs are discussed.
  38. 1 point
    LARA has just discretely posted on their website the attached document outlining 2018 Regulatory Assessment FEES. These FEES WILL impair or prevent MANY operations from participating in the State Licensing Process. LARA Regulatory Fee Assesment 3 22 18.pdf
  39. 1 point
    If you read the original bills the fees are based on the cost of the regulatory operations of the BMMR. There is no question that the staffing and costs they have in that document are based on full legalization and not just regulating a commercial Medical market. The first growers, retailers and other business will have the advantage of being up and running once the full legalization bill passes in November, the downside is they will be bearing the brunt of the BMMR's start up costs.
  40. 1 point
    Guanotea1

    Is Grassmatch a legitimate site?

    Mel, The guy has a long and criminal record that includes assault, weapons, and theft. Resto is using OTIS - which is free - I am using iChat - which I pay $10 /check for. Here is a quote from the OTIS site telling you to use iChat if you want to be sure: "Although every effort is made to maintain accurate records on this database, no action should be taken as a result of information found herein without confirmation with the MDOC, the Michigan State Police through the use of their Internet Criminal History Access Tool (ICHAT) or a review of the court file. The Michigan State Police ICHAT can be found at: http://michigan.gov/ichat." I keep saying - use iChat, use iChat, use iChat...
  41. 1 point
    zapatosunidos

    PGT #385 - The Godfather

    PGT #385 - The Godfather Michael interviews Tim Beck about the history of medical marihuana legislation in Michigan which ultimately led to the MMMA of 2008, the legislative maneuvers that amended the Act in 2012 and 2016, the passage of the Medical Marihuana Facilities Licensing Act, and the Campaign to Regulate Marihuana Like Alcohol, which will be put to a vote in November 2018. View the full article Planet Green Trees Radio Every Thursday Night! Hosted by attorney Michael Komorn from Komorn Law and Chad from Birmingham Compassion Listen LIVE 8-10 pm EST tonight and every Thursday at www.planetgreentrees.com CALL IN NUMBER 347-326-9626 PGT Episode #385 March 22, 2018 Joining us this week: Medical Marihuana Godfather Tim Beck Special In House Guest This Week Long Time Activist And Friend of PGT Tim Beck Will Discuss History Of The Movement Allen Peisner with the AAU- Astute Appellate Update In-Studio regular guests and friends of the show: Debra Young- Den Mother, Extraordinary Political Strategist and Former MiLegalize Board Member Chad Carr- Birmingham Compassion Jim Powers- Michigan Parents for Compassion co-founder, Rabble Rowser and Former MILegalize Board Member Jeff Frazier Singing International Civil Rights Attorney Attorney David Rudoi of Rudoi Law Jamie Lowell Mi-Legalize Board Member Tommy PGT Video Production T-Pain Researcher Extraordinaire and Walking Encyclopedia Charmie Gholson- Mi Moms United, Forfeiture Reform and StopTheRaids And Recovering Cop/Hockey Legend Steve Miller
  42. 1 point
  43. 1 point
    Komorn Law Firm - Ch 7 News - Client Ron and Jon - Asset Forfeiture Interview
  44. 1 point
    blackhorse

    MI growing

    Recreational has 12 plants per household limit also.
  45. 1 point
    Restorium2

    MI growing

    In my opinion; If growing becomes legal for everyone only the big gardens will get scrutinized.
  46. 1 point
    Restorium2

    A Rush To A MM Card

    Funny thing the manager at the clinic said while answering questions; Question from a newby: What about when legalization comes along soon? Answer; It took the State Of Michigan 10 years to get medical up and running right. What makes you think recreational will not take that long too? And on top of that, recreational is shiit weed!
  47. 1 point
    zapatosunidos

    PGT #382 - Wrong Answer

    PGT #382 - Wrong Answer View the full article
  48. 1 point
    and also you have to give LARA all of your bank and financial records for past 3 years... yes i'm serious. its no joke, one of the most restrictive things ever. remember that jeff sessions is going after dispensaries too. and LARA will have all of your records nicely printed out ready to hand over.
  49. 1 point
    Wild Bill

    Sativas & Indicas

    OG Kush is sativa dominant. I understand the strain originated from crossing ChemDawg '91(sativa) to a Lemon Thai/Paki kush (sativa/indica). The OG Kush seed is from Reserva Privada and this pheno is classic indica, dark wide leaves on a compact plant. It already has that distinctive OG smell though. The Rukum is a landrace strain from Nepal, not a hybrid. It comes from the area of the world where many believe cannabis originated. I've been looking for an old fashioned sativa, the kind that makes you laugh until you shart, so I figured a wild landrace would be a good choice.
  50. 1 point
    t-pain

    Posting Clean Pictures Online

    sometimes its easier to hit print screen button, open mspaint (aka paintbrush) and hit paste. then save to a new file. assuming paintbrush doesnt have its own identifying data. instead of print screen button, which will take your whole desktop, you can try using the keyboard or mouse to go to edit > copy when you view your image. or hit ctrl+c on keyboard. open up mspaint and hit ctrl+v or edit>paste with the mouse.
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