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  1. 3 points
    Cannabis advocates are suing the State of Michigan to remove marijuana from the state’s list of controlled substances in its Public Health Code. Although the passing of the adult-use marijuana law in Michigan in 2018, medical marijuana laws and the addition of bureaucracy and state taxes on marijuana sales, the state’s Public Health Code still treats marijuana like heroin. “For 80 years they’ve been locking people up and taking their possessions and harassing and terrorizing us as citizens because we like to smoke weed,” said poet and activist John Sinclair “I want to be part of every effort to completely remove the police from our lives regarding to marijuana. They’ve got nothing at all to do with marijuana.” Sinclair is one of several plaintiffs on the lawsuit against the Michigan Board of Pharmacy and its chairwoman Nichole Cover, filed last week in the Michigan Court of Claims. Interested in getting a license to operate a Cannabis Business. You need a full service law firm. Contact Komorn Law… 800-656-3557. Other plaintiffs include the Michigan Medical Marijuana Association, Dr. Christian Bogner, who researches the effects of cannabis to treat autism; Josey Scoggin, whose daughter is a medical marijuana patient; Paul Littler, a pharmacist; NORML of Michigan. The “absurdity” of the legal conflict between the Medical Marihuana Facilities Licensing Act and the Public Health Code has to be addressed, said Michael Komorn, one of the attorneys behind the case. “It’s intellectually dishonest,” Komorn said. For the past year, state officials have allowed caregivers to grow marijuana at home and bring it to provisioning centers to sell to patients — a practice that continues as there’s a shortage of licensed marijuana in the market. “This is not a controlled substance,” Komorn said. “The idea that someone would be growing an opioid … and bringing it to a pharmacy because they were running low on their meds is the scenario that would have to exist in order for marijuana to remain as a scheduled drug.” “Michigan’s Public Health Code was adopted in 1978, and mirrored much of the national rhetoric towards drugs”, Komorn said. John Sinclair has a long history of advocacy in Michigan; his 1967 arrest over two joints sparked the first Hash Bash in Ann Arbor. The Michigan Supreme Court in 1972 noted in the opinion that overturned Sinclair’s conviction that… “not only that there is no rational basis for classifying marijuana with the ‘hard narcotics’, but, also, that there is not even a rational basis for treating marijuana as a more dangerous drug than alcohol.” The post Lawsuit Filed To Remove Cannabis From Michigan Controlled Substances List appeared first on Komorn Law. View the full article
  2. 3 points
    garyfisher

    Dispensary Discussion

    Here's the full statement Wednesday from the state's Bureau of Marijuana Regulation: It is resolved that the Board will not take disciplinary action against an applicant in the following circumstances: For an Applicant temporarily operating: For the time period ending March 31, 2019: The applicant temporarily operates a proposed marihuana facility that would otherwise require a license if either of the following apply: The applicant’s proposed facility is within a municipality that adopted an ordinance before December 15, 2017 but is pending adoption of an ordinance under the Act, or The applicant’s proposed facility is within a municipality that has adopted an ordinance before December 15, 2017. The applicant notifies the Department within 1 business day of becoming aware of any adverse reaction to a marijuana product sold or transferred, and For purposes of this resolution only, the applicant applied for a license no later than February 15, 2018. An applicant that does not comply with this resolution shall cease and desist operation and may be subject to penalties and sanctions, and An applicant that is temporarily operating is not guaranteed a license. It is further resolved that the Board will not take disciplinary action against a licensee for purchasing marijuana products from a registered primary caregiver (caregiver) or an applicant temporarily operating in the following circumstances: For a licensed Provisioning Center: For the time period ending March 31, 2019: The licensee obtains patient consent on a form provided by the Department prior to selling any marijuana products that have not been tested in full compliance with the law and administrative rules, and The licensee enters all inventory into the statewide monitoring system immediately upon receipt from a caregiver, and The licensee, before any sale or transfer, must verify, and confirm with government issued photo identification, with the statewide monitoring system that a patient or primary caregiver holds a valid registry identification card, and The licensee enters all sales in the statewide monitoring system, and The licensee determines sales will not exceed daily purchasing limits, and The licensee shall notify the Department within 1 business day of becoming aware of any adverse reaction to a marijuana product sold or transferred. For a licensed Grower or Processor: For the time period ending March 31, 2019: The licensee obtains marijuana products from caregivers, and The licensee enters all inventory into the statewide monitoring system immediately upon receipt, and The licensee only transfers marijuana products that have been tested in full compliance with the law and administrative rules, and The licensee tags or packages all inventory that has been identified in the statewide monitoring system, and The licensee shall notify the Department within 1 business day of becoming aware of any adverse reaction to a marijuana product sold or transferred.
  3. 1 point
    Good overview of what we know to date in this NY Times Article. Takeaways: Subject is "polarizing" among academics. Correlation doesn't imply causation. Genetics is critical A couple of quotes: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/17/health/cannabis-marijuana-schizophrenia.html
  4. 1 point
    Turning To Marijuana for a Runners’ High and More Posted by CN Staff on April 20, 2018 at 13:52:42 PT By Jen A. Miller Source: New York Times Colorado -- The ultramarathoner Avery Collins, among the fastest in the world, is not shy about appearing in photographs holding a bong. The first time he tried running after using marijuana, he said, he realized “it allowed me to be very present and not to worry as much about overall times and what’s going on with the run.” Mr. Collins, a 25-year-old from Colorado Springs, is one of a likely legion of athletes who use marijuana as part of their training — although he’s one of the few fast enough to get an endorsement deal from an edibles company. While there are no statistics about how many runners smoke a bowl before hitting the trail, as Mr. Collins often does, marijuana is the second most widely used drug among athletes after alcohol, according to the American Journal on Addictions. Runners say cannabis and cannabis products make their long runs more enjoyable. Many say that pot helps them to recover from hard workouts and races faster. “You have two different reasons potentially for using cannabinoids,” said Marcel Bonn-Miller, an adjunct assistant professor of psychology in psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine who also works with pharmaceutical companies and nonprofit groups doing cannabinoid research. “One is to enhance your ability to train. The other is recovery oriented.” On a federal level, the purchase, possession or use of marijuana is illegal, considered a Schedule I drug — in the same category as heroin, LSD and ecstasy. But attitudes about marijuana have been rapidly changing in recent years, with former stalwart opponents to legalization like John A. Boehner, the speaker of the House from 2011 to 2015, announcing on Twitter “my thinking on cannabis has evolved.” Marijuana is legal at some level in 29 states plus the District of Columbia, Guam and Puerto Rico. Sixty-one percent of Americans now say marijuana should be legalized, up from 31 percent in 2000, according to the Pew Research Center. It’s also not prohibited for recreational use in the eyes of the World Anti-Doping Agency, whose World Anti-Doping Code is used by the United States Anti-Doping Agency, International Olympic Committee and International Paralympic Committee. In 2013, the organization raised the threshold limit of the cannabis metabolite carboxy-THC that could be found in an athlete’s urine from 15 nanograms per milliliter to 150. That’s significantly higher than levels set by some professional sports organizations in the United States. The threshold is 15 in the National Basketball Association and 50 in Major League Baseball, for example. The World Anti-Doping Agency’s decision to raise the threshold “means that athletes using the substance in competition will be detected, while the chances of detecting out-of-competition use,” which is not prohibited, “are substantially reduced,” said James Fitzgerald, senior manager of media relations and communications for the group. Studies on the effects of marijuana on athletes are sparse. “Most of the work is, at the moment, observational, looking at people who use and don’t use and comparing them,” said Dr. Bonn-Miller, who is conducting studies on the use of cannabinoids among former professional football players. “There hasn’t been a whole lot of funding for this.” A 2017 survey in the Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport found only 15 published studies that investigated the effects of cannabis and its main psychoactive ingredient, THC, on exercise performance. “It is generally considered that THC won’t improve aerobic performance and strength, and my review confirms that impression,” said Dr. Michael C. Kennedy, a cardiologist, clinical pharmacologist and associate professor at the University of New South Wales and St. Vincent’s Hospital Medical School, who conducted the review. He doubts claims that it helps with recovery and improves concentration, and says that athletes who tout its athletic virtues are just promoting cannabis use. “It will not make you faster, it may slow you down and certainly should not be used if there is any possibility of heart disease,” Dr. Kennedy said. Indeed, some studies have linked marijuana to hypertension and other heart risks. But Dr. Bonn-Miller believes that from a physiological standpoint, the relationship between marijuana use and running makes some sense. “There’s a lot of overlap in terms of the pathways that are activated between what’s known as a runner’s high and the high that comes from THC,” he said. “Both of those involve activation of the endocannabinoid system, so it’s not too surprising that THC might be used to enhance the runner’s high that’s gained from endurance exercise.” Runners also report using products with cannabidiol, or CBD, a nonpsychoactive component of marijuana that has shown to have anti-inflammatory properties, for recovery. The CBD is usually applied through an oil. “It lowers the amount of many, many pro-inflammatory cytokines — things that our body makes naturally in response to any inflammation response,” said Dr. Orrin Devinsky, director of the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center at NYU Langone Health, who is studying the use of CBD to treat epilepsy. He said that CBD has also been shown to bind to serotonin receptors, “which may be related to its effect as an anti-anxiety agent.” Scott Dunlap, a 48-year-old ultrarunner who calls himself a semiprofessional (he has sponsors but also a day job) and who once ran a race in a marijuana leaf costume, says he will use an edible or vape marijuana after a long race. (He tried it once during a run and said he wound up “lost and hungry.”) He doesn’t see using marijuana after running a race as all that different from drinking a beer — except that a lot of races provide beer free. The 420 Games, which has events in California, Colorado and Pennsylvania, gives out samples — sometimes marijuana, but more often oils and creams containing CBD — in places where they are legal, though the sponsors say they are not intended to be used at the event. “I can honestly say it’s one of my favorite events of all time,” said Mr. Collins, the ultrarunner, who previously served as a spokesman for the event.
  5. 1 point
    AG Pick Puts MJ Enforcement Pledge In Writing Posted by CN Staff on January 28, 2019 at 15:20:44 PT By Tom Angell, Contributor Source: Forbes Washington, D.C. -- William Barr, President Trump's nominee to serve as the next U.S. attorney general, made headlines earlier this month when he pledged during his Senate confirmation hearing not to "go after" marijuana companies that comply with state laws. Now, in response to written questions from senators, Barr is putting that pledge on paper, in black and white. He's also calling for the approval of more legal growers of marijuana for research, and is acknowledging that a recent bill legalizing hemp has broad implications for sale of cannabis products. "As discussed at my hearing, I do not intend to go after parties who have complied with state law in reliance on the Cole Memorandum," he wrote, referring to Obama-era cannabis enforcement guidance that then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions rescinded last year. That said, Barr isn't committing to formally replacing the Cole Memo, which generally directed federal prosecutors not to interfere with state marijuana laws, with new guidance reiterating the approach. "I have not closely considered or determined whether further administrative guidance would be appropriate following the Cole Memorandum and the January 2018 memorandum from Attorney General Sessions, or what such guidance might look like," he wrote in response to a question from Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ). "If confirmed, I will give the matter careful consideration." And Barr, who previously served as attorney general under President George H. W. Bush, says it would be even better if Congress got around to addressing the growing gap between state and federal marijuana laws. "I still believe that the legislative process, rather than administrative guidance, is ultimately the right way to resolve whether and how to legalize marijuana," he wrote in a compilation of responses delivered to the Senate Judiciary Committee on Sunday. But even as Barr reiterated that he wouldn't go after people and businesses that benefited from the Cole memo, he voiced criticism of policy directives like it and of the idea of legalization in general. "An approach based solely on executive discretion fails to provide the certainty and predictability that regulated parties deserve and threatens to undermine the rule of law," Barr wrote in response to a question from Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA). "If confirmed, I can commit to working with the Committee and the rest of Congress on these issues, including any specific legislative proposals. As I have said, however, I do not support the wholesale legalization of marijuana." Nonetheless, legalization advocates were happy to see the nominee reiterating his non-enforcement pledge when it comes to state-legal businesses. "It’s positive to see Barr make the same commitments on marijuana enforcement in writing as he did in the hearings," Michael Collins, director of national affairs for the Drug Policy Alliance, said. "My hope is that he sends this message to all federal prosecutors so that states are given space to reform their outdated, broken, racist marijuana laws, and the country can turn the page on prohibition." Elsewhere in the 247-page document, Barr says that he supports expanding the number of institutions that are allowed to grow marijuana to be used in scientific research. "I support the expansion of marijuana manufacturers for scientific research consistent with law," he wrote in response to a question from Sen. Charles Grassley (R-IA). "If confirmed, I will review the matter and take appropriate steps." A single facility at the University of Mississippi has for half a century maintained a monopoly on the cultivation of cannabis for research, but due to concerns about the availability and quality of its products, the Drug Enforcement Administration in 2016 announced a process to license additional manufacturers. However, under Sessions, the Department of Justice has blocked the agency from acting on any of the several dozen applications it has received from would-be growers. "I am not familiar with the details of these applications or the status of their review," Barr wrote. "If confirmed, I can commit to reviewing the matter." Barr also acknowledged that, due to the passage of the Farm Bill and its hemp legalization provisions late last year, hemp-derived cannabidiol (CBD) and other components and products made from low-THC cannabis plants are legally distinct from those that come from marijuana. "Products derived from hemp, including CBD, are therefore subject to different legal and regulatory restrictions than those derived from non-hemp marijuana plants under certain circumstances," he wrote. He also pledged to "look into" pending medical and scientific evaluations of CBD, which could lead to its formal rescheduling under the Controlled Substances Act. All told, the cannabis comments indicate that if Barr is confirmed by the Senate, the Justice Department would be poised to take a very different approach to marijuana issues than it did under Sessions, who has long been a vocal legalization opponent. "After decades of failed drug war, it’s difficult to grasp the progress we’ve made in just the past couple of years. From a hawkish attorney general who sent a chill through the industry and threatened to escalate enforcement to a nominee who put his hands-off federalist approach to prohibition in writing," said Don Murphy, director of federal policies for the Marijuana Policy Project. "William Barr didn’t just wave the white flag, he signed a peace agreement." NORML Political Director Justin Strekal said Barr is "incredibly wise to acknowledge that the genie is out of the bottle when it comes to the marijuana reform movement." "Now is the time for the Department of Justice to work in good faith with the Senate Judiciary Committee on legislative solutions that address the senseless waste of law enforcement's precious time and resources due to the failed federal policy of prohibition," he said.
  6. 1 point
    Restorium2

    Hello from SW Michigan

    The people who would sign you up for more yield are just taking advantage of you. The people who would recommend it are not your friends and pretty dumb on top of that. You say you want to be legit. Then be legit. Find out what you like by trying out some things from a dispensary and go on from there. This is about you getting your medical supplies, not about some strangers yield.
  7. 1 point
    Restorium2

    I have extra clones

    More bad news for you; Now that you went online and found out that selling clones is illegal, when you get busted the cops will look at your browser history and know that you knew better.
  8. 1 point
    garyfisher

    I have extra clones

    ya thats total bullshlt. I cant believe how many people think this is actually true. edit: The false idea that cops have to tell you they are cops is whats moo poo. not what i quoted.
  9. 1 point
    Restorium2

    I have extra clones

    Cops wish we thought this way.
  10. 1 point
    Restorium2

    I have extra clones

    FACT: Cops can lie to you in the course of their investigation.
  11. 1 point
    dwkl

    LARA - BMMR Releases

    LARA - BMR Releases Current to 1/20/19 PUBLIC HEALTH AND SAFETY Public Health and Safety Advisory Indica LLC 1-18-19 Public Health and Safety Advisory HG Lansing 1-11-19 Public Health and Safety Advisory CCBD 1-10-19 Public Health and Safety Advisory TGMD 1-10-19 Public Health and Safety Advisory 1-4-19: Voluntary Recall BMR ADVISORY Updated Consent Form for the Sale or Transfer of Untested Marihuana Product Recent Changes to Marijuana Laws Notifications of Diversion, Theft, Loss, or Criminal Activity Medical Marijuana Facility Temporary Operation Set to End on December 31, 2018 Updated Universal Symbol THCA Crystals/Diamonds Caregiver and Patient Status Requirements for Certain Licensed Facilities Visiting Qualifying Patients: Out of State Registration New Maximum THC Concentrations For Marihuana-Infused Products Protecting Water Resources When Growing and Processing Marihuana Daily Purchasing Limits & Item Categories in METRC Clarification Regarding Chairman Johnson's Statement at Today's Medical Marihuana Licensing Board Meeting 30-Day Transition Period Regulatory Assessment FY 2019 Consent Form for the Sale or Transfer of Untested Marihuana Product September Emergency Rules Transition Edible Marihuana Products Bulletin Health and Safety Guidance for Medical Marihuana Facilities Processor Reminders Bulletin Facility Reporting Requirements Regarding Hazardous Materials Application Process Grower Gas Detection System and Fumigation Processor Gas Detection System Criminal History Disclosure Statement of Money Lender Form CPA Attestation License Stacking for Class C Growers Co-Location of Medical Marihuana Facilities Registered Caregivers/Patients Transition to Facility Licensee/Employee Local and State Fees License Application Process Municipal Authorization of Marihuana Facilities Continued Operation with Local Authorization Public Act update and Sample Collection Application Document Checklist Licensee Capitalization Requirements and Proof of Financial Responsibility Required Marihuana Product Testing Points TECHNICAL BULLETINS Safety Compliance Facility Information Retesting and Remediation - Technical Bulletin Department Banned Pesticide Active Ingredient List Clarification on the use of term "dispensary" for Provisioning Centers Safety Compliance Facility Inspection Guide Processor Inspection Guide Secure Transporter Inspection Guide Provisioning Center Inspection Guide Grower Inspection Guide Department Approved Pesticide List Update
  12. 1 point
    Yes, these bolded statement are describing drug interactions that you don't see with cannabis alone. I have seen that LSD can change a mind forever. The personality that was there is gone and replaced with something else. In my opinion, what stands in the way of our human minds advancing is that we must move forward as a species without anyone left behind. So the humans with the least advanced minds are what is holding us back. It's been like that every time we make a huge advancement as a species. Like when we started to be able to think about our own thoughts. The most advanced human minds can move forward at the same speed as the least advanced. No one will be left behind, we move forward as a species. Read Cosmic Consciousness by Richard Maurice Bucke, M.D.
  13. 1 point
    For the spiritually aware, cannabis taken alone, or in group use can bring about enhanced visual and audial perception. For instance, I have ability myself to create simple dream like imagery whilst awake, or even musical scores, others report to me they can hear and see them. I can even hold a tic tac board image in mind and ask if another person would like to play, I add an X or O, and they can do this as well, it also works with music scores, or complex building scenarios, like a blueprint, or like what a computer aided design looks like. My understanding as a young man is, we're either being dumbed down and misdiagnosed on purpose, or something less nefarious is at play. People are afraid of the possibility of the human mind advancing leaps and bounds, it very well may shift culture as we know it. It was psilocybin in small amounts as well as cannabis that brought me to these conclusions, both of which are psychedelics. I believe it amounts to practiced thoughts within the new degrees of perception psychedelics bring. There are many individuals whom have reported such telepathic observations during ayahuasca sessions, the main ingredient being DMT, a more potent psychedelic than cannabis typically. The original name proposed for DMT was telepathine. Some pure sativas and even hybrids can have similar effects to psilocybin cubencis mushrooms. Cannabis typically is perceived differently based on the perception of the user, though someone more well practiced can introduce another to these abilities.
  14. 1 point
    Restorium2

    Dispensary Discussion

    Bunch of dispensaries are back open in Bay City now. Most of them. All stocked and competing.
  15. 1 point
    Cannabidiol, or CBD oil, is no longer considered to be marijuana in Michigan under a new legal framework created by the 2018 U.S. Farm Bill and a state law that takes effect this March. Instead of categorizing “all things green and smelly” by default as marijuana, the federal government has defined that the cannabis sativa L. plant that has less than 0.3 percent THC by dry weight as hemp, said Michael Komorn, a lawyer and president of the Michigan Medical Marijuana Association. Yet state officials have not yet determined how it will be regulated. CBD oil is typically derived from hemp — though it can be derived from marijuana — and contains less than 0.3 percent THC, the active component in cannabis that makes someone high. CBD oil is rising in popularity for treatment of pain, anxiety and depression. “CBD and other cannabinoids extracted from the plant are not criminalized anymore but would be subject to FDA regulations,” Komorn said. Have a Law Firm represent your interests to get your state license to operate your Cannabis Business. Contact Komorn Law… 800-656-3557. In May 2018 officials at the Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs announced that they regarded CBD oil as marijuana — which sparked backlash from users, who didn’t like the idea of getting a medical marijuana card just to buy a product that contained relatively no THC. Read The Rest Of The Story Here The sounds of flipping and flopping can be heard in the halls The post Michigan officials deal with CBD oil regulation appeared first on Komorn Law. View the full article
  16. 1 point
    dwkl

    Payroll/HR/Insurance

    Thank You for Joining the Community. Our policy limits marketing on the site. If you would like to straight up advertise and sponsor the forum please see our advertising guide. https://www.michiganmedicalmarijuana.org/ad_info/ We really do not allow drop and run advertising. Feel free to educate and discuss the topic with others in the forum community. Good try though.
  17. 1 point
    blackhorse

    Dispensary Discussion

    MILegalize and other groups asked the governor to intervene. Hopefully Happy Life will open again soon.
  18. 1 point
    Barr Supports Federal Marijuana Prohibition Posted by CN Staff on January 16, 2019 at 05:49:41 PT By Alexandra Hutzler Source: Newsweek Washington, D.C. -- Donald Trump’s attorney general nominee William Barr appears to have a similar stance on marijuana as his predecessor Jeff Sessions, telling lawmakers on Tuesday that he would support federal prohibition of the drug across the United States. Barr told the Senate Judiciary Committee that he would support prohibiting marijuana “everywhere” but also said that, if confirmed, his approach would be “not to upset settled expectations” in states that have already legalized weed for medical or adult use. “I’m not going to go after companies that have relied on the Cole Memorandum,” Barr told the committee. “However, we either should have a federal law that prohibits marijuana everywhere, which I would support myself because I think it’s a mistake to back off marijuana. But if we want a federal approach, if we want states to have their own laws, let’s get there and let’s get there the right way.” Currently, more than 30 states across the U.S. have legalized marijuana for either medical or recreational use. Former Attorney General Sessions, who was forced to resign from his post shortly after the midterm elections, was one of the biggest opponents to marijuana legalization. He has repeatedly said that “good people don’t smoke marijuana” and once commented about the Ku Klux Klan: “I thought those guys were OK until I learned they smoked pot.” Last year, Sessions rescinded a trio of memos from the Obama administration that adopted a non-interference policy with marijuana-friendly states. The move essentially shifted the federal government’s hands-off approach to marijuana policy and allowed federal prosecutors to crack down on weed possession in states where it was legalized. At the time, Sessions called the policy change a “return to the rule of law.” But Barr told lawmakers the current state of marijuana reform is “untenable and really has to be addressed.” He said that marijuana policy is a “binary choice” and the federal government should either ban marijuana everywhere, or create a standardized way for states to take their own approach to legalization. Barr also told the committee he did not intend to use limited federal resources within the Justice Department to enforce federal marijuana laws in states that have already legalized the drug in one form or another. “But I think it’s incumbent on the Congress to make a decision as to whether we are going to have a federal system,” he added. “Because this is breeding disrespect for the federal law.” Source: Newsweek (US) Author: Alexandra Hutzler Published: January 15, 2019 Copyright: 2019 Newsweek, Inc.
  19. 1 point
    garyfisher

    Dispensary Discussion

    I love seeing all the patients scrambling now. I'm handing out cheese for all the wine I'm hearing.
  20. 1 point
    They should have to provide video of the questions being asked. This smacks of creative interpretations of biased inflections when asking questions. The only questions asked that makes any difference would be about driving impairment, not 'highness'. Seems to come from a discriminatory angle; The freaking high minds are driving! They will eventually admit that most people can drive just fine once they get used to the drug. Then we will prove, again, that we have been falsely accused and wrongly repressed for generations now.
  21. 1 point
    GrowGoddess

    Recreation - 10oz or more?

    Looks like I was misquoted. I was referring to two different people growing in the same household. One being a medical caregiver the other not. Both grows being separated, in different rooms, and behind locked doors. It is mostly just a curiosity question. In other words, since a caregiver has a medical grow, does that mean another household member cannot grow their own recreational crop in that residence? Basically, would that residence be "banned" from any recreational grow as long as a medical grow was on the premises? Again, just out of curiosity, nothing planned in my world for something like this, but am guessing there are others that would consider it. Currently my medical grow is for 3 patients, I do not have room for any more plants than that, never did. If the legalization does go through, I will probably downsize and only grow some personal. Getting older and more tired! It would be awesome to have the freedom to take a real vacation and more overnight trips. It has been a long time.
  22. 1 point
    Restorium2

    Recreation - 10oz or more?

    One or the other. You can't add the totals together. Both laws are 'total possession' of the one person. Pick your path and stick with it, keep your story straight and true. Keep saying that you can't stay in compliance with the plant count too high and they will fix it. Just stay quiet and happily keep your harvest private.
  23. 1 point
    More like $500 to $4000 depending on the quality. There's a very wide range of cannabis out there. To put it all in the same price range is rather insulting.
  24. 1 point
    One way, among many, that cannabis works; Inflammation is part of the normal healing process. There's an interaction that takes place between key molecules. When our immune systems get hyper active this interaction can get out of control and do more harm than good. Many diseases are attributed to this out of control immune system problem. Cannabis can slow the out of control inflammation process to the point that it's back in the normal range and can play it's roll in the normal healing process.
  25. 1 point
    Grow Thread

    Dr. Greenthumb Seeds

    hi guys!! just wanted to chime in. you have made some real good points, but let's not forget what's REALLY happening here. Marijuana from seed is much like humans from the embryo. as an amateur breeder myself i have seen it first hand. geno's, pheno's.... whatever nowadays, can be hidden for numerous generations. i know you guys are talking about cindy99 and i know some about the strain, but not enough to enter a conversation about it..... but i will say that it is a strain of marijuana, and the genetics can be "dormant" for generations only to emerge later. kind of like 2 or 3 generations going by in your family and then a kid with red hair shows up?? wtf? "where did that come from?".... well, "my great-grandfathers sister had red hair".... see what i am getting at? i bought a pack of Nirvana White Widow in 1997. Shortly after widow was introduced, Nirvana and one other seed breeder obtained a packet of seeds and ran with them. by 1997 nirvana had picked the best of the bunch, crossed, back-crossed, blah blah the strain with itself before "stabilizing" it somewhat and then selling the strain themselves. well, i obtained a packet of 20 beans from Nirvana in 1997 and have been growing that strain ever since. thats a long donkey time and a crapload of harvests. i initially picked the best male of the bunch and hand-pollinated the best female. so i had my own batch of 100 or so seeds to play with. the differences in genetics that has come out over the years with these beans is incredible. i have read hundreds of grow journals in the last 15 years. i am not joking about that either. in most of those grow journals the strain being grown was Nirvana White Widow. i have followed it forever. i am not a pro.... nor will i ever be, but i promise you that through my own playing around with the strain over the years, i have had traits from the original award winning strain come through. when this happens, i clone them. and then i have pollinated those clones with a new "best male of the bunch", and produced another batch of seeds..... and so on. long story, sorry, but the moral is this.... F1, F89, original.... matters yes.... but like blonde parents with a redheaded child.... sh*t happens. and marijuana is very unpredictable. B)
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