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  1. 4 points
    I don't know about this product, but would like to offer some advice. I have seen you post a lot of threads, asking about all these different supplements and additives. As a beginner especially, less is more man, a complete base nutes, and maybe a bud booster if you feel froggy is all you need to grow good weed. Focus more on controlling environment and less on figuring out what snake oils work. This is truly in the spirit of helping, please don't take it the wrong way. When I started, I tried everything. I now use a base nute, recharge, and a bud booster, and a little molasses, that's it. I produce 2 plus on a 1000w light of excellent quality
  2. 3 points
    Slappy

    Slappys 90w 7-band led

  3. 2 points
    Restorium2

    Pics of my first grow

    Very nice. Now here's the deal; Your plants are doing just right. Don't change anything and ride it out. You have them right where you want them.
  4. 2 points
    First, get out your magnifying glass and look for mites. There is a little tip burn. Could be too much nutes. Do you use a meter for your nutes?
  5. 2 points
    Slappy

    White Widow

    Get that 80x or higher microscope at start watching those trichomes. You should be able to see the beginning of clear trichome development. It's very important to familiarize yourself with the ripening of the trichomes. So don't hesitate to check those trichomes every couple of days. You're prolly excited anyway, so it just adds to the fun. LOL.
  6. 2 points
    Chairman Sends Marijuana Email To NORML Posted by CN Staff on August 13, 2019 at 08:33:25 PT By Tom Angell, Contributor Source: Forbes Washington, D.C. -- Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D-NY), who last month filed legislation to remove marijuana from the Controlled Substances Act and begin repairing the harms of prohibition enforcement, asked the advocacy group's supporters to write their own members of Congress in support of his bill, the Marijuana Opportunity, Reinvestment, and Expungement (MORE) Act. "America has a moral responsibility to pass my legislation to end the prohibition of marijuana and take on the oppression at the heart of the War on Drugs," Nadler wrote. "I’m proud to work with NORML to create a more just national marijuana policy." The bill will "once and for all end the destructive policy of federal marijuana prohibition in America" and "remedy the widespread inequities and injustice this policy has brought upon tens of millions of Americans," the chairman told the legalization group's members. Beyond descheduling cannabis, the MORE Act would create processes for the expungement and resentencing of prior convictions and prevent government agencies from blocking access to federal benefits or impeding citizenship status for immigrants due to marijuana use. Additionally, it would levy a five percent federal tax on cannabis sales, with some revenue earmarked for job training and legal aid programs for people impacted by prohibition enforcement as well as loans for small marijuana businesses owned by socially and economically disadvantaged people. Its introduction comes amidst what observers are saying is the most marijuana-friendly Congress in history. Less than eight months into the two-year session, dozens of cannabis proposals have been filed, seven hearings have been held on the issue and legislation to increase marijuana businesses' access to banking services has cleared a key committee. "With Chairman Nadler's leadership, we believe that the MORE act will likely be the first bill to end federal marijuana criminalization ever to pass in a chamber of Congress," NORML Political Director Justin Strekal said in an interview. "Representative democracy is not a spectator sport. Now is the time for the majority of Americans who support legalization to demand reform from their legislators, just as Mr. Nadler's message to our members indicated." Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA), a 2020 presidential candidate, filed a companion version of Nadler's bill in the Senate. "In 1977, I cast my first vote as a freshman member of the State Assembly to decriminalize marijuana in my home state of New York," the chairman wrote to NORML's supporters. "Since then, I have been committed to ending the criminalization of marijuana. The criminalization of marijuana is a mistake and caused grave harm, disproportionately to those who are poor or people of color, and we must take action." Nadler's bill was endorsed by a group of justice-focused organizations such as ACLU and NAACP in a letter to House leaders earlier this month. "Criminal justice involvement deprives individuals from low-income communities of color equal access to economic opportunity," the groups wrote. "Incarceration robs families and communities of breadwinners and workers. Thus, any marijuana reform bill that moves forward in Congress must first address criminal justice reform and repair the damage caused by the war on drugs in low-income communities of color." Calling the proposal an important step "to bolster communities ravaged by the war on drugs," the groups are pushing congressional leadership to see that it is "swiftly marked up and immediately scheduled for floor consideration" following the August recess. "The hysteria around marijuana is starting to lift as states across the country lead the way in reforming their marijuana laws. It is time for the federal government to follow suit," Nadler wrote in the new message to NORML's list. "Marijuana is a public health and personal freedom issue, not a criminal one. We can no longer afford the moral or financial costs of the War on Drugs." The New York congressman sent a separate email to his own campaign list last month asking his supporters to sign a petition backing his cannabis bill. Also last month, a Judiciary subcommittee held a hearing on marijuana prohibition at which members of both parties express broad support for ending or scaling back federal prohibition, with disagreement mostly focusing on the details or competing proposals to do so. Source: Forbes Magazine (US)
  7. 2 points
    Restorium2

    Monthly Limit?

    Yes there is. All the dispensaries are integrated with the State on this. Your card number is entered into the system with how much you bought. They total the amount you bought at all dispensaries and you can't go over 10 ounces in 30 days.
  8. 2 points
    i just switched to rockwool for the first time ever in 14 years. It's a lot cheaper than rapid rooters for me and I get the same results. Make sure the cubes stay moist. Roots within 14 days. I also use a heat mat.
  9. 2 points
    If you ever had to change your scedule like that, it is possible.I have done it twice, without any negetive effect. It will not hurt for them to sit in the dark for a day. You are not disrupting them in the dark, you are mearly resetting their day. I can't speak for all situations, but in my case, there was no negetive effect
  10. 2 points
    glued gorilla

    20/4 VS 18/6 for VEGGING???

    I have run them all, differences are negligible. I run 24 on, but do notice that some strains show a bit a bit of stress. 18/6 I feel you get slightly slower growth, but happy plants. 20/4 you get the best growth and happy plants. I don't like using timers, because they can fail, so I run 24on. Make the decision based on what you want. Lower electric?, Go with 18/6. Faster growth, either 24 on or 20/4, these 2 are very close, if you want to mess with a timer, 20/4 is probably best. Again, differences are SMALL, pick one
  11. 2 points
    Restorium2

    Nutrients! Not enough?

    Very carefully monitor ph and nute strength in what you feed them. Fans for strong stalks. Flavor? That is what it is depending on the strain. Just grow them healthy.
  12. 2 points
    Slappy

    Monthly expenses..

    Yeah, I would estimate between 400-600 a month at the dispensary. Always hit and miss. Cheap meds are around. Either low shelf or tainted. I'm no caregiver, but if I was able to dispense, it be at least 180 a zip. After I harvest, i start with medicating with about 1 zip a week. Then the tolerance builds...then it's 1 and a half, and so on. That's why I like to alternate strains quickly. Catch them hoes like pokemon! Oh, and I have a metal rod in my leg, so I always stay medicated. Because like, even walking hurts. LOL. Don't even get me started on stairs.
  13. 2 points
    Slappy

    Pics of my first grow

    Since you only have one shot at it, keep an eye on how long she(they) stretches. If she stretches for a month or so, you'll likely have a longer flowering plant. If she stops vertical growth around 3 weeks, you'll prolly finish around 8 weeks. Just a reference, and not a guarantee. Plants can surprise you sometimes.
  14. 2 points
    wjkingsnorth

    Pics of my first grow

    One week into bloom. So excited!
  15. 2 points
    yep. We are 4 weeks into flower now with the new lights. I have 3 HLG600H kits and the above light in a 10x10 room currently. They're bright and I'm working on installing potentiometers so I can push less watts and get the lights even closer.
  16. 2 points
    Restorium2

    Pics of my first grow

    You should have them both on.
  17. 2 points
    Hydro Jack

    t5 fluorescent for flowering?

    I vegged/flowered for years with T5 lamps....Got decent results but much better when I switched to HPS....Now I only use cob led...HJ
  18. 2 points
    wjkingsnorth

    Pics of my first grow

    This morning all 4 were in bloom! 🥰
  19. 2 points
    wjkingsnorth

    Pics of my first grow

    I have some buds starting to pop. It is hard to see in the picture but they are starting.
  20. 2 points
    Highlander

    1500 watt x 2 LED grow

    Seven weeks in flower. I had a misstep with this plant in about week 3 that resulted in most of the fan leaves turing brown. It still looks pretty nice. This plant never saw HPS.
  21. 1 point
    Restorium2

    Green Crack

    The best usually grow the slowest, bud the latest, and take the longest to finish. That's why you can't get the best at the dispensary and most caregivers don't grow them. Not much money in it. Just quality, which the 'get rich quick gang' just claim anyway.
  22. 1 point
    That's impressive. Not using soil tho, I use 14 things including phUP, and mycos in flower. I just started using terpinator, so now it's 15. My clusterfu*k formula still cost about 200 bucks less than AN's whole line-up. LOL.
  23. 1 point
    You need to ride it out and just start the next grow at 7pm every night your playing with fire messing with light schedules.
  24. 1 point
    Slappy

    Switching night to day in the tent

    Using that A/c should suck out a bunch of humidity in the room too.
  25. 1 point
    Restorium2

    Trouble cloning in rockwool cubes?

    One thing I would add to the above video is to scrape some of the outer stem off the lower one inch of the stem. Helps the roots to form there.
  26. 1 point
    Restorium2

    20/4 VS 18/6 for VEGGING???

    I know how you roll. What you post means exactly.... nothing. Totally lost it. You are on ignore forever now.
  27. 1 point
    Restorium2

    New caregiver registration

    You can grow PLENTY on your 12 legal rec plants. Then find a patient to sell to if you want to grow more. Up to 5 patients.
  28. 1 point
    glued gorilla

    11 hour flowering?

    You can play with different light cycles, but 12/12 is the standard. Getting some experience first with that will be beneficial in being able to recognize positive or negetive reactions in the experiment. In my experience 11on/13off caused a slightly faster maturation (like a week) and a reduction in yield. I also tried 13on 11off with opposite results. If I had time to go 11 weeks I would do 13/11. A plant will flower when it's critical night period is reached. This can vary from strain to strain , but is usually between 10.5 and 12hrs darkness.
  29. 1 point
    Wild Bill

    Pics of my first grow

    Don't harvest too soon! That's the number one mistake new growers make.
  30. 1 point
    Slappy

    What Spectrum for clones?

    Blue is needed, Full-spec won't hurt. You don't even need that much light for clones. I have my best results using a 125w CFL Daylight.
  31. 1 point
    Phil69

    Vaping Cannabis Oil

    I've not made my own oil yet, just have a press that I built with a harbor freight press, couple aluminum blocks, couple controllers and a couple heat rods. If I get into making oil, I'll check out some ceramic carts 👍
  32. 1 point
    Restorium2

    Vaping Cannabis Oil

    I found the best ceramic thick oil carts on Amazon. They aren't ooze brand. Had to try a few different ones before I found some that work good.
  33. 1 point
    Slappy

    1500 watt x 2 LED grow

    Dude at the growshop made the switch to CMH. He said they run way cooler than hps, and the end result is better. I've been intrigued every since. You should do hps v.s. cmh forum. Since your HPS game is on point, that'll be fun to watch.
  34. 1 point
    Kingdiamond

    t5 fluorescent for flowering?

    Look into the ceramic metal halide lamps they say one 315 watt bulb works as well as a 600 watt hps .
  35. 1 point
    Restorium2

    Pics of my first grow

    You have entered into the twilight zone ….. ah, no. Your plants have entered that time when the buds expand quickly. Shows everything is going well.
  36. 1 point
    Restorium2

    1500 watt x 2 LED grow

    I'm using 4 different kinds of LEDs right now. They all work about the same. They cost about $150 for 1500. Replaces a 1000 HPS.
  37. 1 point
    Restorium2

    1500 watt x 2 LED grow

    Totally clueless masquerading as a pro.
  38. 1 point
    Restorium2

    1500 watt x 2 LED grow

    You remind me of a 6 year old that just talks because they want to sound like an adult.
  39. 1 point
    From the Marijuana Policy Project who was founded in January 1995 and medical marijuana was illegal in every state. Favorable legislation had not been introduced in Congress in a decade. Since then, Congress has approved budget riders to protect state-legal medical marijuana programs every year since late 2014; numerous bills have been introduced to remove federal penalties for state-legal conduct and to end federal marijuana prohibition entirely; recreational, adult-use marijuana is now legal in 11 states and the District of Columbia; medical marijuana is legal in 33 states and the District of Columbia; and much more. Last updated: July 24, 2019 Only 23 states allow citizen-initiated ballot initiatives, meaning in most states the only way to reform marijuana laws is via the legislature. With polls showing that 66% of Americans support making marijuana use legal and around 90% support for allowing medical marijuana, lawmakers are increasingly getting the message that constituents want them to act on sensible and humane marijuana policies. On June 25, 2019, Illinois made history when it became the first state to approve legalizing and regulating adult-use marijuana legislatively, rather than via voter initiative. MPP led the lobbying campaign and played a key role in crafting the measure. (Vermont became the first to legalize adult’s possession and cultivation — but not sales — legislatively in 2018. MPP also played the leading role in that advocacy effort and is continuing to work to regulate sales.) Legislatures have approved several other significant marijuana policy reforms this year. In Hawaii, New Mexico, and North Dakota, the governors signed decriminalization bills into law. Meanwhile, medical cannabis was enacted in the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Guam’s Senate and governor approved legalizing and regulating marijuana for adults’ use. Unfortunately, while the Iowa Legislature sent Gov. Kim Reynolds a medical cannabis bill, she vetoed it. The below lists 2019 state bills to adopt new laws to legalize marijuana for adults, to adopt effective medical marijuana laws, or to replace possible jail time with fines for marijuana possession. Click on the state names below to learn more about efforts in your state and to take action in support of marijuana policy reform. We also encourage you to check out MPP’s Marijuana Policy Progress Report 2019. The report — which was released on July 22, 2019 — includes MPP’s top 10 list of marijuana policy reforms this year, as well as a state-by-state run down of marijuana policy reform bills that were taken up by state legislatures. Find out if your state expanded its medical marijuana or adult-use law, eased record expungements, or made other improvements. Marijuana Legalization Legislation States with bills to legalize — and in most cases regulate — marijuana for adults: 27 and Guam Arizona (SRC 1022, which would have referred a statutory ballot measure to voters; the bill died in committee) Connecticut (HB 7371, SB 1085, SB 1138, HB 5595, HB 6863, SB 496, SB 690 SB 744; HB 7371 passed out of the General Law Committee, SB 1085 passed out of Judiciary, and SB 1138 passed out of Finance; the three pieces of a legalization package are on the floor but did not get a vote before adjournment) Delaware (HB 110; the House Revenue and Finance Committee advanced the bill in an 8-3 vote on June 5; it now advances to the Appropriations Committee; the legislature adjourned but the bill carries over to 2020) Florida (S. 1780, H. 1117, S. 1298; S. 1298 proposed a constitutional amendment that would go to voters for adults to grow, possess, and use cannabis; the legislature adjourned without voting on the bills) Hawaii (HB 1515, HB 1581, HB 708, SB 606, SB 686, SB 702; these bills did not advance out of committee before a deadline) Illinois (SB 7, HB 902, HB 2477;HB 1438; the Senate approved the substitute bill (HB1438) in a 38-17 vote on May 29 and the House followed suit on May 31, 66-47; Gov. J.B. Pritzker signed the bill into law on June 25, 2019) Indiana (HB 1460, HB 1685, SB 213; did not advance out of committee before a deadline) Iowa (SF 469; did not advance before a legislative deadline) Kentucky (SB 80; the legislature adjourned without voting on the bill) Louisiana (HB 509, HB 564; these bills were defeated in the House Criminal Justice Committee) Maryland (SB 771 and SB 656; HB 632 proposed a constitutional amendment that would go to voters in 2020; these bills did not advance before the legislature adjourned) Minnesota (HF 2285, HF 265, HF 465, SF 2840, SF 619, and HF 420; HF 265 and HF 465 propose a constitutional amendment that would go to voters in 2020; the Senate bills were voted down in committee in a 6-3 vote) Mississippi (SB 2349, died in committee) Missouri (HB 157, HB 551, died in committee) Montana (HB 770; did not advance before the legislature adjourned) New Hampshire (HB 481; the House voted 200-163 to pass the bill on April 4, 2019, sending the bill to the Senate; on May 30, the Senate voted to delay action on the bill until January 2020) New Jersey (S 830, A 1348, A 3819; the Senate Budget and Appropriations Committee and the Assembly Appropriations Committee each voted on November 26 to advance S2703 and A4497; both bills carried over to 2019; the Senate Judiciary Committee reported a revised bill out on March 18, 2019) New Mexico (HR 356, SB 577; the House approved HR 356 in a 36-34 vote, then the bill died in the Senate Finance committee; the legislature has adjourned) New York (A. 1617, S. 1527, and S. 1509 and A. 2009, which were budget bills that included taxing and regulating cannabis for adults’ use; the legislature adjourned without voting on legalization) North Carolina (SB 58) Pennsylvania (HB 50) Rhode Island (H 5828 and H 5151; H 5151 was a budget bill that includes taxing and regulating cannabis for adults’ use; however, the budget that passed the House did not include legalization, and the legislature adjourned without voting on H 5828) Tennessee (HB 235, SB 256 would legalize under an ounce of marijuana, without legalizing sales or cultivation; the legislature adjourned for 2019, but the two-year session reconvenes in 2020) Texas (SB 1581, HJR 108, SJR 8; the latter two proposed a constitutional amendment that would go to voters in 2020; the bills did not advance before the legislature adjourned) Virginia (HB 2371, HB 2373, both of which died in committee) West Virginia (SB 143, HB 2331, HB 2376, HB 3108; these bills did not advance before the legislature adjourned) Wisconsin (AB 220; the governor’s budget — AB 56/SB 59 — would have legalized possession and cultivation of limited amounts of marijuana; the budget that was approved did not include those provisions) Guam (the Senate approved Bill 32‐35 on March 27 in an 8-7 vote, and it was signed into law by Gov. Lou Leon Guerrero on April 3, 2019) Ten states have already passed laws to regulate marijuana like alcohol: Alaska, California, Colorado, Illinois, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington. All but Illinois were by ballot initiative. A 11th, Vermont, allows adults to possess and cultivate marijuana, but does not yet allow regulated sales. Vermont’s S. 54 and H. 196 would allow and regulate commercial cultivation, product manufacture, and sales. S. 54 passed the state Senate and will be taken up in the House in early 2020. Bills to Remove Possible Jail Time — Often Imposing a Fine — for Simple Possession (“Decriminalization”) States with decriminalization bills: 17 Alabama (SB 98, HB 96; the Senate Judiciary Committee approved SB 98 in a 11-0 vote on April 17; after being amended to apply to only five grams, HB 96 was voted down in the House Judiciary Committee in a 5-6 vote; the legislature has adjourned) Arizona (SB 1284, HB 2555; the legislature adjourned without voting on the bills) Arkansas (HB 1972; did not advance before the legislature adjourned) Florida (H. 1289, S. 1714; the legislature adjourned without voting on the bills) Hawaii (HB 1383, HB 434; HB 1383 — which only includes up to three grams — has passed both chambers and was sent to the governor; Gov. David Ige signed the bill into law on July 9, 2019) Idaho (H. 140, an extremely limited measure that only applied to those with no prior drug offenses; died in committee) Iowa (HF 93; died in committee) Indiana (HB 1283, HB 1540, HB 1658; did not advance out of committee before a deadline) Kentucky (SB 82, HB 265; the legislature adjourned without voting on the bills) Louisiana (HB 59; was withdrawn prior to introduction) New Jersey (S472, A3468, S1926) New Mexico (SB 323; passed the legislature and Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham signed the bill into law on April 3, 2019) North Dakota (HB 1155, HB 1050; the legislature passed HB 1050 and it was signed into law by Gov. Doug Burgum; it only applies to those 21 and older and carries a hefty criminal fine) Oklahoma (HB 2614, SB 1030; SB 1030 has passed both chambers, but in different versions; as passed by the House, it would have reduced the penalty to a misdemeanor fine of up to $400; however, the conference committee version did not include decriminalization) South Carolina (HB 3276; did not advance before a legislative deadline, carries over to 2020) Texas (HB 63, SB 156; HB 63 passed the House in a 98-43 vote on April 29, but was not brought to a vote in the Senate; it would have imposed a $500 criminal fine for possession of up to an ounce) Virginia (SB 997, HB 2079, HB 2370, HB 2644; HB 2079, HB 2370, and HB 2644 are stalled in committee; SB 997 was defeated in committee) Twenty-six states and Washington, D.C. have decriminalized or legalized marijuana possession (including Hawaii, New Mexico, and North Dakota’s new laws). Effective Medical Marijuana Bills States with bills to create comprehensive medical cannabis programs: 14, plus the U.S. Virgin Islands, where the bill has been signed into law Alabama (HB 234, SB 236; on May 9, 2019, the Alabama Senate passed SB 236 in a 17 -6 vote; it applies only to adults 19 and older; the bill was amended in the House to merely form a study commission on the issue and was signed by the governor in that limited form) Georgia (SB 232; the legislature adjourned without passing it, but the legislature did pass, and Gov. Kemp signed, a bill to allow in-state access to up to 5% THC medical cannabis oil) Iowa (SF 104, HF 732; HF 732 passed the legislature but was vetoed by the governor; the speaker refused to call a special session for an override; the bill would remove a 0.3% THC cap and instead allow cannabis preparations with up to 25 grams of THC every 90 days, or more with a waiver from the patient’s healthcare provider) Indiana (SB 357, HB 1384, HB 1535; did not advance out of committee before a deadline) Kansas (HB 2163, SB 113, HB 2303, SB 195; the legislature adjourned without voting on the bills) Kentucky (HB 136; passed the House Judiciary Committee in a 16-1 vote a week before the legislature adjourned, but did not get a floor vote before adjournment) Mississippi (HB 1372, SB 2358, SB 2643, SC 537; SC 537 is a constitutional referral; did not pass committee prior to a deadline) Nebraska (LB 110; passed the unicameral legislature’s Judiciary Committee on May 10 in a 5-1 vote, with one absent and one present but not voting; the unicameral legislature did not vote on the bill prior to adjournment; a 2020 ballot measure signature drive has begun) North Carolina (HB 401) South Carolina (H. 3660, S. 366, H. 3081, H. 3272; S. 366 passed a Senate Medical Affairs subcommittee and is in the full committee; the legislature adjourned for the year but the bills will carry over to 2020) Tennessee (SB 486, HB 637; the legislature adjourned for 2019, but the two-year session reconvenes in 2020) Texas (HB 122, HB 209, HB 1365, SB 400, SB 865, SB 90, SJR 7, HJR 21; the latter two would have referred a proposed constitutional amendment to voters in 2020; the House approved HB 1365 on May 7, 2019; it would expand qualifying conditions to the state’s low-THC medical cannabis program and would allow regulators to decide the ratio of cannabinoids, which could allow for a full medical cannabis program; it did not receive a hearing in the Senate; a far more limited bill (HB 3703), which adds some qualifying conditions and removes the two-physician cap, passed both chambers and was signed into law) Wisconsin (AB 220; the governor’s budget — AB 56/SB 59 — would have legalized medical marijuana, but the approved budget did not include medical cannabis) Wyoming (HB 278; this bill did not advance before the legislature adjourned) U.S. Virgin Islands (Bill 32-0135; On December 28, 2018, lawmakers voted 9-4 to send the bill to the governor’s desk. He signed the bill on January 17, 2019.) Thirty-three states, D.C., Puerto Rico, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, and the U.S. Virgin Islands have effective medical marijuana laws. Don’t see your state? If you live in a state that still prohibits marijuana and no lawmakers have taken the lead to change that, send your state legislators a note to ask them to stand up for humane and sensible marijuana policies. Take a few moments to email them in support of medical marijuana, decriminalization, or legalizing and regulating marijuana. And wherever you live, please ask your member of Congress and U.S. senators to support legislation to protect individuals who are complying with state medical marijuana and legalization laws. This information appeared on Michigan Policy Project – Key Marijuana Reform Who is Marijuana Policy Project? MPP, which was founded in January 1995, is the largest organization in the U.S. that’s focused solely on enacting humane marijuana laws. MPP’s mission is to change federal law to allow states to determine their own marijuana policies without federal interference, to allow the medical use of cannabis in all 50 states and U.S. territories, and to regulate marijuana like alcohol. MPP has been responsible for changing most of the state marijuana laws that have been reformed since 2000, including more than a dozen medical cannabis laws and the legalization of marijuana by voter initiative in Colorado, Alaska, Maine, Massachusetts, Nevada, and Michigan. MPP also assisted on the California campaign. MPP’s team spearheaded the campaigns that resulted in Vermont and Illinois becoming the first two states to legalize marijuana legislatively in 2018 and 2019. MPP is actually composed of two separate organizations — MPP, founded in 1995, is the main branch that deals with lobbying and ballot initiatives, and MPP Foundation, founded in 1996, is the tax-deductible educational branch. In addition, MPP has state committees in the states where MPP is running ballot initiatives; these state committees are formed and closed every few years. MPP has approximately 20 employees; this includes a full-time lobbyist on Capitol Hill. In addition, MPP has lobbyists on retainer in a number of states capitals around the country. Marijuana Policy Project History Visit the MPP for many informative articles about marijuana legislation. It’s a great site! Recent Posts Marijuana Policy Reform Legislation Review 2019 Michigan Civil Forfeiture Asset Update 2019 Nevada to introduce first banking system for the cannabis industry. Social Equity (Adult-Use Marijuana) Federal data unmasks the epidemic of 76 billion opioid pills Marijuana Policy Reform Legislation Review 2019 Posted: July 29, 2019 From the Marijuana Policy Project who was founded in January 1995 and medical marijuana was illegal in every state. Favorable legislation had not been introduced in Congress in a decade. Since then, Congress has approved budget riders to protect state-legal medical marijuana programs every year since late 2014; numerous bills have been introduced to remove federal […] 0 comments Michigan Civil Forfeiture Asset Update 2019 Posted: July 24, 2019 Michigan Civil Forfeiture Asset 2019 Update from a 2017 ICLE interview on asset frofeiture with Michael Komorn and Jeff Frazier. US Supreme Court decided Tyson Timbs v. Indiana, 586 U.S. _____ (2019) on February 20, 2019. Tyson Timbs was convicted of drug charges that had a maximum monetary fine of $10,000. At the time of […] 0 comments Nevada to introduce first banking system for the cannabis industry. Posted: July 23, 2019 Nevada officials to introduce the nation’s first banking system for the cannabis industry. 0 comments Social Equity (Adult-Use Marijuana) Posted: July 18, 2019 The Social Equity Program is available as a provision under MRTMA to promote and encourage participation in the marijuana industry by people from communities that have been disproportionately impacted by marijuana prohibition and enforcement and to positively impact those communities. Michigan Communities That Meet Criteria For The Social Equity Program Albion Benton Harbor Detroit East […] 0 comments Federal data unmasks the epidemic of 76 billion opioid pills Posted: July 17, 2019 There’s a database maintained by the Drug Enforcement Administration that tracks the path of every single pain pill sold in the United States — from manufacturers and distributors to pharmacies in every town and city. The data provides an unprecedented look at the surge of legal pain pills that fueled the prescription opioid epidemic, which has […] 0 comments Proposed bill would expunge records of many marijuana offenses Posted: July 16, 2019 It was Nov 6th 2018… a date many will never forget…a date many never perceived marijuana would become legal in their lifetime… So many friends disappeared into the legal system, so many lives and families ruined…and so much potential suppressed. The legal system made its money and had its glory days and surely they will […] 0 comments Employers Can Refuse to Hire and Terminate Medical Marijuana Users Posted: July 15, 2019 An employer can refuse to hire an applicant and terminate an employee who tests positive for marijuana. 0 comments Court Policies Still Punish the Poor with Fines-Jail-Probation-Debt Posted: July 13, 2019 Court policies continue despite a 1983 U.S. Supreme Court decision that found it unconstitutional to incarcerate defendants too poor to pay fines. 0 comments Michigan Adult Recreational Use of Marijuana Posted: July 12, 2019 What is MRTMA? On November 6, 2018, Michigan voters approved Proposal 1, creating the Michigan Regulation and Taxation of Marihuana Act (MRTMA). Among other things, this Act delegates responsibility for marijuana licensing, regulation and enforcement to the Michigan Department of Regulatory Affairs (LARA). LARA’s Marijuana Regulatory Agency (MRA) is responsible for the oversight of medical and […] 0 comments THINGS TO KNOW IF YOU WANT TO START A MARIJUANA BUSINESS IN MICHIGAN Posted: July 10, 2019 Michigan is months away from licensing recreational marijuana businesses and opening a new chapter in the state’s cannabis industry. 0 comments The post Marijuana Policy Reform Legislation Review 2019 appeared first on Komorn Law. View the full article
  40. 1 point
    Sorry if I'm in wrong forum I'm new to this site have my card and will send pic on request PM me I do use bud but maybe only an oz a month but I love concentrates looking for 6 or 7 g for 100 price range lmk what we can do thanks guys have a great day. Patryk
  41. 1 point
    Restorium2

    orange light in co2 sensor

    Could be the grow light. Make sure it's not going on and off, malfunctioning. If you are worried about a small light then put tape over it.
  42. 1 point
    Rockwool sucks I use my ez cloner straight into fox farms light warrior making sure a healthy amount of roots are showing.
  43. 1 point
    Restorium2

    600 watt / 1200 led comparison

    When you have it down there's very little room for improvement only room for failure to adapt properly. Congrats on a perfect adaptation to a totally different light source.
  44. 1 point
    blackhorse

    600 watt / 1200 led comparison

    After harvesting the plants I see very little difference between plants under the 600 watt compared to under the LED. Savings in electrical use will be big difference. Next flower will be one 600 watt and two LED's. 600 watt in center and LED on both ends. Tent is 5' x 10'.
  45. 1 point
    White widow, day 56. 150w LED
  46. 1 point
    Thanks, Semi. I enjoyed putting the light together and it was fairly easy. I used 40 rivets for that entire frame and a few pieces of angle alumium. If you notice in the very first post of the kits, the driver is mounted on top of the light, adding heat to the room. The light rig i just built has the driver remotely mounted outside of the insulated grow space. Eventually I'll remotely mount the drivers in the kits I built as well. These lights are bright and WILL bleach your plants white if less than 12", some run 18" but 18-24" is the closest you want to get them in flower at 150watts per quantum board. If you ran the QBs at 60w you could get them a lot closer. I'm pushing the limits of these LEDs with the highest amperage allowed.
  47. 1 point
    glued gorilla

    Naughty neighbor

    It's on the LARA website, the whole language of the law is there, not the easiest to find, but it's there
  48. 1 point
    glued gorilla

    BIGGER buds and STRONGER Stalks?

    Using a silica product through week 3 flower, and having a fan blowing just enough to make the plant dance will help stengthen stalks. Trelis, or bamboo stakes and bonsai or soft green wire for support. As far as bigger buds, there are a lot of factors at play. The amount and spectrum of light , temp, humidity and co2 level affect how fast a plant can take up nutrients and grow. Higher temp, humidity, and co2 with the right amount of light allow you to push more nutes and get a higher yield and bigger buds. There are limitations of your genetics though, a strain will only do what it can, some strains do not produce large colas. I have found that I get better quality by using minimal nutes in coolish room and moderate co2, instead of pushing the limits. Quality over quantity for me.
  49. 1 point
    I'd love to find a great blueberry again, like the DJ Shorts BB I had a few years ago.... The only blueberry I've grown that smelled and tasted like blueberry and just as strong in scent and affect as lemon cake.
  50. 1 point
    Highlander

    What Do You Do With Your Weed Scraps?

    Get a cat and mix your MJ waste with used cat litter. Let LEO deal with that mess.
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