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  1. 2 points
    The public hearing for public comments will be heard on April 27, 2018. Read more about it at http://komornlaw.com/petitions After the MMMA was enacted by a vote of 63% of Michigan voters in 2008, the legislature has declined to add any new qualifying conditions to protect patients from arrest. Senator Rick Jones even attempted to remove Glaucoma from the MMMP's list of qualifying conditions. Patients , caregivers and other interested parties wrote in opposition to the bill. A handful of petitions have been submitted over the years. LARA (and the previous MDCH department) have used various reasons and tricks to deny these petitions. Only Post Traumatic Stress Disorder has been added as a qualifying condition to the Michigan Medical Marihuana Act. Autism and Parkinson's disorder petitions were approved by the Michigan medical marihuana review board (the board consists mostly of physicians). These petitions were denied by the LARA director. The petitions were not deficient in any way and should have been accepted by LARA. We resubmitted the Autism petition again, with 20 additional research studies. Now, with the help of numerous patients, researchers, Dwight Z. and Dr. Christian Bogner along with the Michigan Medical Marijuana Association and Michael Komorn, we have assembled a massive amount of peer-reviewed medical research and government data to show that these conditions should be approved to protect patients, caregivers and physicians from arrest for the medical use of marijuana to treat their conditions. This project took months of work. Reading, organizing, searching and collecting thousands of pages of research from all over the world. Including the most up to date medical studies, peer-reviewed patient surveys and the national reviews of all medical marijuana studies by the National Academies of Science. The oldest peer-reviewed medical research paper cited within these petitions was from the first volume of The Lancet in 1889. Birch EA. The use of Indian hemp in the treatment of chronic chloral and chronic opium poisoning. The Lancet. 1889;133:625. Cannabis, Indian Hemp, Marijuana, whatever you call it, physicians were using this non-toxic plant in 1889 to treat chronic opium poisoning and opium addiction. As opioid based prescriptions are addicting and killing approximately 142 Americans each day in 2017, medical marijuana is a non-lethal non-toxic way to avoid "America enduring a death toll equal to September 11th every three weeks." The qualifying condition petitions were based primarily on the following: Already approved qualifying conditions in other medical marijuana states. Historical and ancient medical books. Patient self-reports and surveys. US Government Department of Health and Human Services Patent on using marijuana to treat many diseases and injuries, including brain injury on humans. Institute of Medicine 1999 report on medical marijuana. This report was the basis for the MMMA, specifically cited within the Michigan law, MCL 333.26422 (b). National Academies of Science (formerly the Institute of Medicine) 2017 updated report on medical marijuana. Included research not only supports each qualifying condition petition, but also answers questions that the LARA directors, physicians and medical marijuana review panel board members had asked of past petitioners. Reports on dosages, safety profiles of marijuana, statistics from the CDC and Poison Control, and information from NIH, FDA and the DEA are presented in the petitions. This information was included in order to compare the safety, effects and side-effects of medical marijuana with FDA approved prescription medications. All of the patients, caregivers, researchers, the Michigan Medical Marijuana Association and it's president Michael Komorn fully agree that marijuana should be removed from the Controlled Substances Act. Marijuana should continue to be studied as a treatment for every human and animal disease. Marijuana also should be submitted to the FDA for approval as a medicine. We fully support all clinical trials related to using marijuana as a treatment for any condition, disease or injury. As all of the scientific peer-reviewed published clinical trials show, marijuana is an effective medicine. The http://www.nih.gov website was heavily utilized throughout this project for locating scientific peer-reviewed published research, reports and information. The petitions are grouped by similar conditions, symptoms or mechanisms of treatment. Included in this post are some choice quotes from a few studies in each group of petitions. 001.-Anxiety.pdf 004.-depression.pdf 007.-Obsessive-compulsive-disorder.pdf 008.-panic-attacks.pdf 011.-Schizophrenia.pdf 012.-Social-Anxiety-Disorder.pdf Marijuana and Medicine Assessing the Science Base 1999 report from the Institute of Medicine https://directorsblog.nih.gov/2014/04/10/anxiety-reduction-exploring-the-role-of-cannabinoid-receptors/ Medical Cannabis in Arizona: Patient Characteristics, Perceptions, and Impressions of Medical Cannabis Legalization. 014.-arthritis.pdf 023.-Rheumatoid-Arthritis.pdf Preliminary assessment of the efficacy, tolerability and safety of a cannabis-based medicine (Sativex) inthe treatment of pain caused by rheumatoid arthritis Transdermal cannabidiol reduces inflammation and pain-related behaviours in a rat model of arthritis 025.-brain-injury.pdf 030.-Treatment-of-spinal-cord-injury.pdf 031.-asthma.pdf Effects of smoked marijuana in experimentally induced asthma. Effects of cannabis on lung function: a population-based cohort study Newspaper ad from 1876 selling marijuana cigarettes for treating asthma. You may laugh at a marijuana cigarette as a real medical treatment, but marijuana is a verified bronchodilator similar in strength to albuterol, the standard asthma medication. The medical efficacy of this specific brand of Asthma cigarettes were specifically exempted within the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs as created by the United Nations. This means these marijuana cigarettes were still able to be sold after each country banned marijuana. https://www.unodc.org/unodc/en/data-and-analysis/bulletin/bulletin_1951-01-01_4_page002.html https://www.unodc.org/unodc/en/data-and-analysis/bulletin/bulletin_1962-01-01_4_page005.html 036.-diabetes.pdf The Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids The Current State of Evidence and Recommendations for Research (2017) The Impact of Marijuana Use on Glucose, Insulin, and Insulin Resistance among US Adults 044.-colitis.pdf 050.-gastric-ulcer.pdf 055.-Inflammatory-bowel-disease-IBD.pdf 064.-Ulcerative-colitis.pdf Marijuana Use Patterns Among Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease Minnesota Medical Cannabis Program: Patient Experiences from the First Program Year by the MN Department of Health 2016. Cannabinoids and the Urinary Bladder Cannabinoids and gastrointestinal motility: Animal and human studies Medical cannabis – the Canadian perspective Impact of cannabis treatment on the quality of life, weight and clinical disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease patients: a pilot prospective study. 106.-organ-transplant.pdf https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4541500/ Medical Marijuana and Organ Transplantation: Drug of Abuse, or Medical Necessity? 107.-Non-severe-and-non-chronic-Pain.pdf https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3998228/ LARA statistics show the majority of the 250,000+ patients in the MMMA are using cannabis to treat chronic pain. As we know that the medical use of marijuana can treat “severe and chronic pain” already, it can and should be used to treat regular generic pain that is not severe and chronic. The reports and information from the Minnesota Department of Health on its medical marijuana program are very detailed and informative about patients experiences with medical marijuana. Minnesota Medical Cannabis Program: Patient Experiences from the First Program Year by the MN Department of Health 2016. http://www.health.state.mn.us/topics/cannabis/about/appendixa.pdf 108.-Parkinsons.pdf Other states already approve of medical marijuana for Parkinson's Disease. Including: Georgia, Vermont, Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Ohio, New Mexico, New York, Pennsylvania, West Virginia and California http://www.google.com/patents/US6630507 111.-Tourette's-Syndromequalifying.pdf Tourette’s Syndrome is an approved medical marijuana qualifying condition in Arkansas, Illinois, Minnesota and Ohio. While the MMMA covers persistant and severe Muscle Spasms, Tourette's Syndrome sufferers may not have the severe symptoms that qualify. The 1999 Institute of Medicine report states that marijuana can be used to treat Tourettes Syndrome. 112.-MMRP-Autism-Petition-2qualifying.pdf Pennsylvania Medical Marijuana Program lists Autism as a qualifying condition. There are two clinical trials for Autism and cannabis in 2017: Cannabinoids for Behavioral Problems in Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Double Blind, Randomized, Placebo-controlled Trial With Crossover. Cannabidivarin (CBDV) vs. Placebo in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) https://nccih.nih.gov/health/autism https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5473390/ Safety and Efficacy of Medical Cannabis Oil for Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia: An-Open Label, Add-On, Pilot Study. An Open Label Study of the Use of Dronabinol (Marinol) in the Management of Treatment-Resistant Self-Injurious Behavior in 10 Retarded Adolescent Patients https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4648553/ DOWNLOAD ALL PETITIONS ONLY (34MB) DOWNLOAD ALL PETITIONS AND SUPPORTING STUDIES HERE (1.7GB)
  2. 2 points
    Highlander

    Member card address

    No. The card has your mailing address. The forms do not ask for the address of the grow. I and several others on this website have used PO boxes for our mailing address many times without an issue.
  3. 1 point
    How Seniors Joined the Cannabis Craze Posted by CN Staff on April 20, 2018 at 10:03:50 PT By Sara Davidson Source: New Yorker Magazine USA -- On a sunny afternoon last August, a dozen women from Balfour Senior Living, in Louisville, Colorado, boarded a bus for a field trip to a marijuana dispensary. One used a walker, one was hooked up to an oxygen tank, and another wore a linen suit and jewelry. All were told to wear hats while walking from the bus to the dispensary door. “The sun is our enemy,” one said. Joan Stammerjohn, who is eighty-four, said she’d joined the group because she’s had chronic pain in her legs, and has been on OxyContin for ten years. “I’d like to get off it,” she said. Others said they had ailments like arthritis or back pain, but didn’t want to disclose their names because they believe marijuana is still stigmatized. “We’re travelling incognito,” one said. “I’m excited. I came to open my mind—I want to know the latest things. I hope this won’t be in the paper, though. We’ll have a crowd coming to Balfour, thinking this is the coolest place.” Filing inside the Ajoya dispensary, they were overwhelmed by display cases filled with pills, tinctures, edibles, jars of green flower clumps, vape pens, oils, patches, and creams. As they listened to budtenders suggest what to use for pain, arthritis, or sleep, a ninety-two-year-old bowed her head and slowly, slowly, started slumping against the counter. “Are you all right?” I asked. She fainted to the floor. A staff member knelt beside her as she regained consciousness. Paramedics arrived, but a half hour later, the woman, smiling, walked out the door with a hundred and twenty dollars worth of products. Seniors are America’s fastest-growing population of new cannabis users. Ten thousand people turn sixty-five each day, according to the Pew Research Center, and more and more are trying the drug for their health and well-being. Even conservative politicians are warming to the idea. John Boehner, the sixty-eight-year-old former Speaker of the House, who in 2011 said he was “unalterably opposed” to the legalization of marijuana, recently made news by announcing that he was joining the board of Acreage Holdings, which distributes cannabis across eleven states. His “thinking on cannabis” had “evolved,” he tweeted. In Louisville, the week before the field trip, there had been a lecture at Balfour by Joseph Cohen, D.O., the founder of Holos Health, which advises people on medical cannabis. The talk drew an overflow crowd of two hundred, with people standing against walls and spilling into the hallway. “The first thing older folks say when they enter our office is, ‘I don’t want to get high,’ ” Cohen said. He explained that there are two primary compounds in cannabis: THC, which is psychoactive, and CBD, which is not. “So CBD is a great solution for elders,” he said. “I took a little CBD before this talk, to make sure I stay calm.” Cohen is seventy-one, with a long, gray ponytail and a beard. He recommends CBD for age-related diseases, such as Parkinson’s, dementia, osteoarthritis, and chronic inflammation. “CBD has twenty times the anti-inflammatory power of aspirin and two times the power of steroids,” he said. Since cannabis is federally illegal, none of his claims—or those made by any other clinician—can be supported by double-blind studies on humans, the gold standard in medical science. But in February a peer-reviewed study of almost three thousand patients in Israel, the first of its kind, showed that cannabis can be safe and effective for seniors, and lead to decreased use of pharmaceuticals, including opioids. In the study, published in the European Journal of Internal Medicine, almost ninety-four per cent of patients reported improvement in their condition, with their pain level reduced by half. For Cohen, who practiced obstetrics and gynecology for thirty years, such results speak to the power of the endocannabinoid system, which regulates many body processes, such as nerve signalling, reproduction, and the immune system. “When I went to medical school, we didn’t know about the endocannabinoid system,” he said. “We knew about THC because we’d light up between classes.” The audience laughed. “We’re wired for this plant,” he continued. He explained that the body makes endocannabinoids—chemicals similar to THC and CBD—which lock onto receptors found throughout the body, especially in the brain. “Receptors are not found in the body because there is a plant out there that will trigger them,” Raphael Mechoulam, the Israeli biochemist who discovered THC, in 1964, said. “Receptors are present because the body makes compounds that activate them.” Two major groups of seniors are turning to cannabis. The first, like the women on the field trip, have never tried marijuana and are drawn to its alleged health benefits. The second are boomers who “smoked dope” in the sixties and seventies, giving it up when they became focussed on careers or raising kids. An attorney I know in Los Angeles, who didn’t want his name disclosed, recently returned to the drug after developing acute pain in his joints. At seventy-one, he was diagnosed with polymyalgia rheumatica, an inflammatory autoimmune disease. His doctor put him on prednisone. This decreased the pain but had unpleasant side effects, including insomnia, and required him to give up his passion for fine wine. When he began hearing that CBD was anti-inflammatory, he secured a medical license and went to a dispensary. “I was shocked,” he said. “The last time I was smoking grass, you bought a baggie filled with sticks and seeds from some shady character.” At the dispensary, he saw products labelled with the names of strains and the percentages of THC and CBD they contained. “The twenty-something budtenders became my sommeliers,” he said. “They’re as knowledgeable as wine stewards at the best L.A. restaurants.” He found a strain, Bubba Kush, that helped him sleep, and gradually started experimenting with other strains, finding new and enjoyable effects. Another boomer I talked to is a former high-school art teacher, in Boulder, who wanted to try CBD for anxiety. After receiving strains with high amounts of the chemical from her daughter, in Seattle—Colorado growers were breeding the plant to increase THC instead—she started making her own oil from the plant. Her kitchen looked like a scene from “Breaking Bad.” (“Breaking Bud,” as she put it.) The oil relieved her anxiety, and she shared it with friends, asking them to report their responses. One said it improved her arthritis; another said it helped with acid reflux. About forty per cent felt no effect. This confirmed what’s generally acknowledged: people respond differently to the same sample of cannabis. “You have to be your own chemistry set,” she said. Cannabis’s appeal isn’t universal; it's still stigmatized in some communities. Sue Taylor, a seventy-year-old retired Catholic-school principal, never smoked pot while raising her three sons, and many in her Oakland community, she said, saw it as “a hardcore drug that got their young men in jail.” The incarceration rate of African-Americans for drug charges is nearly six times that of whites, despite a similar rate of drug use. When one of Taylor’s sons called to say he was studying at Oaksterdam University, which offers training for the cannabis industry, she flew to Oakland to “save him from drugs.” But she was persuaded of pot’s medical value after doing some research, visiting senior care homes, and working at Harborside dispensary, where she saw patients’ conditions improve after cannabis treatment. Taylor is now a commissioner on aging in Alameda County, and said she is one of two people in California certified to train physicians and nurses in medical cannabis. She speaks at churches and senior centers. “In the beginning, they’ll sit, frowning, with their arms folded across their chests,” she said. “I tell them I’m not trying to convince anyone, I’m only here to educate you about the health benefits.” This summer, she plans to open iCANN Berkeley, a dispensary and wellness center, in a historically black neighborhood, which will cater to seniors. “Seniors are the most vulnerable population we have,” she said. “People think they can give them a pill and not worry if it’s gonna kill them because they’re almost dead anyway.” For Taylor, polypharmacy—the prescription of multiple drugs—is an urgent issue. “Most seniors we see are taking fifteen to twenty-six pills a day,” she said, adding that this can start with something as simple as a consultation for high blood pressure. “The doctor gives them a pill for it, which causes the thyroid to go out. The thyroid pill causes the liver to go out. The liver pill makes your pancreas go out of whack, and the list goes on,” she said. “Most important, the patients are not getting better. They’re getting worse and worse.” Six months after the Balfour field trip, I contacted some of the participants to see how they’d fared. Leslie Brown, who suffers from insomnia, said she tried one pill. “I gave it a shot and it didn’t help me sleep, so I didn’t take any more,” she said. Her husband, Ira, who has neuropathy, said he tried a gummy bear two times and “it had no effect.” When I reported this to Cohen, he said that “people have to realize that you sometimes you have to wake up your receptors. You have to try it several times. And not everything works for everybody, anyway.” When I told this to Leslie, she was silent. “Maybe I’ll try it again,” she said. “It would be nice to have a good night’s sleep.”
  4. 1 point
    the premise of the article seems flawed. it was illegal for people to smoke at high times cannabis cup prior to legalization yes? and now its still illegal for people to smoke at high time cannabis cup post-legalization, due to permits, yes? no difference. mostly the cannabis cup is just marketing for local cannabis slingers. he who pays most gets the win. trophy to put on website, etc. then they buy ads in high times selling the expensive seeds of the "winner" strain. $10 a seed are you kidding me ? its like someone took the joke "best pizza in town" and turned it into reality. what , did they have a pizza contest when i was not looking?
  5. 1 point
    Great information Consular Thank you The Picture is Charlie and me
  6. 1 point
    Easy E

    Member card address

    PO BOX here too. ; )
  7. 1 point
    The Michigan Medical Marijuana Association has submitted a petition for treating opioid dependence with medical marijuana. The public hearing for public comments will be heard on April 27, 2018. Read more about it at http://komornlaw.com/petitions Pa. approves sale of marijuana 'flower,' and will allow cannabis to treat opioid addiction Updated: APRIL 16, 2018 — 5:58 PM EDT by Sam Wood, Staff Writer @samwoodiii | samwood@phillynews.com The price of medical marijuana could fall dramatically for some patients by mid-summer. And the drug will soon be used to treat opioid withdrawal in Pennsylvania, which will become the second state after New Jersey to allow it for that purpose. At a news conference in Harrisburg, Secretary of Health Rachel Levine said she had approved the sale of cannabis flower, the traditional smokable or vaporizable form of the plant. “It’s another tool,” Levine said. “The whole idea of this program is to provide another tool in the toolbox of physicians to treat these conditions.” Since the launch of the state medical marijuana program in February, dispensaries in Pennsylvania have sold only pricey marijuana oils and extracts. Flower, also known as leaf or bud, needs no processing and is less expensive to produce. “For some patients, the cost of their medical marijuana could drop by 50 percent with the addition of flower,” said Chris Visco, owner of TerraVida Holistic Centers, a chain of dispensaries with shops in Sellersville and Abington. “It offers the lowest price per milligram of THC, the active ingredient.” Marijuana producer Charlie Bachtell, CEO of Cresco Yeltrah, said being able to sell plant material will streamline a large part of his production. “We just have to weigh it and put it in a container,” he said. “There’s no manual labor turning it into something else, whether it’s filling a capsule or filling a vape pen. Every time someone touches it, it makes it more expensive.” Though smoking cannabis is prohibited by Pennsylvania law, the difference between lighting up and vaporization is literally a matter of degrees. Vaporizing requires less intense heat and a specialized electronic device so that the marijuana doesn’t combust, but the method delivers the same psychoactive and physical effects as smoking. (To discourage smoking, dispensaries are forbidden from vending pipes, bongs and rolling papers.) Nearly all of the 29 states that have legalized marijuana in some form allow for the distribution of plant material. Minnesota and West Virginia are among the last weed-legal states with laws banning its sale. Levine accepted more than a dozen recommendations made last week by the state’s medical marijuana advisory board. With her decision, doctors will still need to register but will be able to opt out of the published registry. Terminal illness, neurodegenerative diseases, and dyskinetic and spastic movement disorders are now qualifying conditions. Allowing the use of cannabis to help wean people off of opioids may have the greatest impact on the state. New Jersey was the first to approve “addiction substitute therapy for opioid reduction” last month. By adding treatment for opioid withdrawal to the list of approved uses, Levine opened up the possibility for clinical research on the two drugs at state health systems. “This is major news,” said physician Sue Sisley, founder of the Scottsdale Research Institute, where she researches medical marijuana’s effects on PTSD in veterans. “We have all these opioid task forces in so many states, and almost none of them even mention cannabis as a substitution for opioids as part of the treatment strategy.” Sisley called Levine’s decision “courageous” but warned it could be politically “radioactive.” “It’s a very conservative medical environment you have in Pennsylvania,” said Sisley, who serves on the steering committee of Jefferson’s Lambert Center for the Study of Medicinal Cannabis and Hemp in Philadelphia. “But Dr. Levine recognizes she needs to solve the problem and start preventing all these deaths that are all so preventable.” Advocates applauded the evolution of the state marijuana program. “I am ecstatic today,” said State Sen. Daylin Leach (D., Montgomery), who helped drive the legislation that became the state’s medical marijuana law. “Allowing the whole plant will dramatically expand the number of patients who benefit from medical cannabis and will go a long way toward guaranteeing that this huge new industry survives and prospers.” Becky Dansky, legislative counsel of the Marijuana Policy Project, said that allowing the sale of flower represented more than a cheaper option for patients, many of whom are on disability. “For many patients, it’s the best form to treat their symptoms,” Dansky said. “The key now is to get it on the shelves as soon as possible.” http://www.philly.com/philly/business/cannabis/marijuana-medical-flower-opioid-addiction-therapy-rachel-levine-cresco-terravida-20180416.html
  8. 1 point
    Kingdiamond

    Member card address

    Yeah all of my cards have a po box so no its not a requirement .
  9. 1 point
    Some Republican Lawmakers Now Think Highly Of It Posted by CN Staff on April 17, 2018 at 05:17:15 PT By Kurtis Lee Source: Los Angeles Times Washington, D.C. -- States that have passed laws legalizing recreational marijuana in recent years appear to have found some new, unexpected supporters: Republican politicians. Since voters began to pass recreational marijuana measures in 2012, the pro-pot movement has seen swift support from many Democrats, with Republicans often pushing back against legalization. Those expressing concern or opposition have cited, among other things, the potential for pot to be a gateway drug, and they have regularly sided with law enforcement, which has established a unified front against recreational marijuana. But a recent mix of public opinion, an influx in tax revenue and questions surrounding states' rights has in part led to a shift in rhetoric and legislative proposals. President Trump last week spurned a threat by his Justice Department to crack down on recreational marijuana in states where it is legal, easing concerns about the possibility of raids and prosecution. Trump's directive Friday came in response to concerns from Sen. Cory Gardner (R-Colo.). Since January, Gardner has criticized an announcement by Atty. Gen. Jeff Sessions that he would rescind an Obama-era policy that directed federal prosecutors not to target marijuana businesses that operate legally under state law. Gardner had responded to the announcement by blocking Justice Department nominees. Gardner had opposed recreational marijuana before Colorado passed its legalization measure in 2012, but has become one of the law's staunchest defenders. For him, the issue centers on states' rights. Shortly after Sessions' announcement, Gardner tweeted that it "trampled on the will of the voters in CO and other states." To date, nine states — Colorado, California and Nevada among them — have legalized marijuana for recreational use, allowing people 21 and older to purchase and possess up to an ounce of marijuana. Many states that have legalized recreational use have seen a boom in tax revenue. In 2016, Colorado generated about $250 million in tax revenue from recreational pot. Washington state raked in even more, about $256 million. Most of the money goes toward public school systems, according to state agencies that are tasked with overseeing legal marijuana. The cost of legal marijuana varies based on taxes imposed in states and cities. In Denver, for example, marijuana costs an estimated $163 an ounce, according to MarijuanaRates.com, which tracks cannabis pricing. In Los Angeles, an ounce costs an average of about $250. Neal Levine, chairman of the New Federalism Fund, a nonpartisan group that aims to maintain state and local authority over cannabis laws and has worked on policy with Republicans, said that over the years his organization has seen support grow in the GOP. "Siding with state governments over federal regulation is an important principle of federalism and consistent with conservative values," Levine said. "The president himself has been a consistent proponent of states' rights and letting the federal government get out of the states' way on this issue. We expect our Republican champions on Capitol Hill will continue to lead on this issue and for those numbers to grow." He cited the work of, among others, Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-Costa Mesa), who is the lead sponsor of the Respect State Marijuana Laws Act. The measure, which has more than a dozen Republican cosponsors, aims to prevent the federal government from criminally prosecuting individuals and businesses that are engaging in state-sanctioned activities specific to the possession, use, production and distribution of pot. Other Republicans who have worked on marijuana legislation include Rep. Tom Garrett of Virginia, who last year introduced the Ending Federal Marijuana Prohibition Act of 2017. If passed, the bill would take marijuana off the federal controlled substances list — joining other substances such as alcohol and tobacco. In addition, several other Republicans have crafted legislation to protect medical marijuana laws, which have been passed in more than two dozen states. Even so, these measures have stalled in the Republican-controlled Congress. Lawmakers have not made the issue a focal point, instead concentrating on such issues as tax reform. Levine said it's only a matter of time before more Republican members of Congress change their tune and make the issue a legislative priority. Last week, former GOP House Speaker John A. Boehner announced that he was joining the advisory board of Acreage Holdings, a company with cannabis operations in several states, and that his position on legal marijuana had changed based on public opinion. For years, Boehner had opposed legal marijuana, in part because he believed it was a gateway drug. "As public opinion shifts, members' opinions on this are going to shift — I'm a prime example," Boehner told Bloomberg. "Over these last 10 years, my attitude has changed pretty dramatically on this." In October, a Gallup poll found 64% of respondents supported the legalization of recreational use of marijuana in the United States. For the first time, the poll found, a majority of Republicans surveyed — 51% — favored legalization. That number was up from 42% a year before. Meanwhile, 67% of independents supported legalization in the October poll, compared with 72% of Democrats. Other surveys have shown similar results. Mason Tvert, vice president of communications for VS Strategies, a public affairs firm based in Denver that specializes in cannabis policy, said he expects the numbers will continue to trend upward. "And that's going to force politicians — especially Republicans who have been somewhat reluctant — to continue to support the end of marijuana prohibition," Tvert said. In recent years, some Republican governors have implemented legalization efforts at the behest of voters. Two years ago, Nevadans overwhelmingly passed a measure allowing the sale and possession of up to an ounce of marijuana for anyone older than 21. Republican Gov. Brian Sandoval opposed the ballot measure but softened his language and worked to implement the law after voters passed the measure by a nearly 10-percentage-point margin. And in January, Vermont Republican Gov. Phil Scott signed a bill that legalized recreational marijuana. In Vermont, legalization has been debated for years, with most polls showing widespread support for it. Among voters there, 57% supported allowing adults to possess and grow limited amounts of marijuana, according to a survey conducted last year by Public Policy Polling. Thirty-nine percent opposed. "I personally believe that what adults do behind closed doors and on private property is their choice," Scott said when he signed the legislation. "So long as it does not negatively impact the health and safety of others."
  10. 1 point
    Blkwlf

    Posting Clean Pictures Online

    mibrains: TYVM for bringing this topic to the forefront. It's a huge worry for all of us whether here on MMM or anywhere else. T-pain: Always a wealth of info. happy to see you here. Everyone else: "HYA" Been a while since I've logged on. Brief update: My 2017 outdoor grow didn't go so well but had plenty for my patients which is what matters anyhow. Finally have an indoor grow which I've gotten from cut into flower without mites, mildew, etc. It's only taken me 3 years!! Took the advice I got here, bombed the heck out of my grow rooms, left the rooms empty of plants/plant material for over 2 months while bombing periodically and changed to Miracle Grow instead of the harder sterile soils and nutrients. The thieves DID come back and tried to hit my outdoor grow w/o success and w/o their vehicle.....lol Neighbor watch helped. Someone, and I never asked who, took the valves out of all the tires on the vehicle!! They must have been hiding out in the cold and wet waiting for a ride for some time because I got the name/address of the owner of the vehicle from the tow truck driver and they came a long way for nothing last fall. With everyone having access to satellite pictures of anyone's property, there's no way to hide an outdoor grow from anyone. Now there's a security tip I'ld be interested in....how to keep satellite photos of my property off the Internet! Three things I believe lead to lesser outdoor grow. Idiot me didn't think to reconstitute the nutrients in the soil until too late, got plants in late and got some kind of blight which stunted my plants and caused entire branches to just dry up and die off. I had a huge issue with huge grasshoppers which, though they didn't go after my plants, had to be here for some food source which hadn't been plentiful enough to attract them in the past. Security worked though so...on I go for another year. :-) I couldn't have gotten this far w/o the support I've found here. Thank you everyone! Blkwlf
  11. 1 point
    mibrains

    Posting Clean Pictures Online

    so i was asking and then was also asked by a community member about the security of the data attached to pictures posted online. i found this excellent information site with directions and links for free data removal. http://www.labnol.org/software/remove-photograph-metadata/19588/ i tested the windows explorer - properties - details idea and i was able to clean all the personal identifying information imbedded in the photo. An Alternative Way to Remove EXIF Information If the photographs are in one folder, you can easily remove the EXIF data from one or more of these photographs using Windows Explorer itself without requiring any additional software. Select all the images files, right click and choose Properties. Now hit the Details tab and click on the “Remove Properties and Personal Information” link. The next screen will give you an option to remove the various metadata that is embedded inside the pictures. Simple. i highly recommend anyone who uploads photos to the WWW cleanse them of any personally identifiable information.. particularly if your posting pictures of cannabis. hope this helps..
  12. 1 point
    Been looking at doing a cycle using a dual arc bulb I have used EYE hortilux bulbs almost a decade but the bulbs are pricey and ive been watching a lot of YOUTUBE growers getting killer results adding the blue spectrum to their flower room I will update this post when I start seeing results to do a comparison with previous grows yields flavors bud appearance etc.
  13. 1 point
    Dana Nessel wins Democratic Party endorsement for Michigan Attorney General! https://www.freep.com/story/news/local/michigan/2018/04/15/nessel-democratic-endorsement-michigan-attorney-general/518873002/?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter
  14. 1 point
    Wild Bill

    Bud porn !

    This is a freebie from Canuk Seeds. Their version of White Widow. A very pretty plant.
  15. 1 point
    It doesn't matter. You give LARA your mailing address - not the address of your grow. You can even use a PO Box. I did that for years for a variety of reasons, not the least of which was if I lost a card I didn't want a street address on it.
  16. 1 point
    Restorium2

    New laws big business

    Quality will always rule. It's all that really matters after the hyp, free grams and pre rolls. It's never about the hat, it's always about the cattle ......
  17. 1 point
    Wild Bill

    New laws big business

    I believe that there will always be a place for caregivers. Those who truly need cannabis for medical reasons will be priced out of the recreational market because of all the taxes and mark ups on the product. I've also been noticing that the black market is thriving in the states where they have legalized because the legal shops can't beat the black market price. Those caregivers who grow in order to help their patients will do just fine. Those who think that they're on their way to riches will be greatly disappointed.
  18. 1 point
    t-pain

    Posting Clean Pictures Online

    you can use ffmpeg to quickly and easily strip data. ffmpeg works on all operating systems and is free. http://ffmpeg.zeranoe.com/builds/win32/static/ffmpeg-latest-win32-static.7z (7z is like zip and can download it http://www.7-zip.orgfor free.) ffmpeg -i input.jpg output.jpg it is a command line tool, and that command will reencode the jpg to a new file, so you may lose some quality. if you are on windows, you can make a .bat file with this: c:\ffmpeg.exe -i "%1" "%1"-dataremoved.jpg c:\ffmpeg.exe -i "%2" "%2"-dataremoved.jpg c:\ffmpeg.exe -i "%3" "%3"-dataremoved.jpg c:\ffmpeg.exe -i "%4" "%4"-dataremoved.jpg c:\ffmpeg.exe -i "%5" "%5"-dataremoved.jpg c:\ffmpeg.exe -i "%6" "%6"-dataremoved.jpg c:\ffmpeg.exe -i "%7" "%7"-dataremoved.jpg c:\ffmpeg.exe -i "%8" "%8"-dataremoved.jpg c:\ffmpeg.exe -i "%9" "%9"-dataremoved.jpg and then dragging and dropping (up to 9) images onto the .bat file will work. here is an example: C:\>exiftool 20150113_160206.jpg ExifTool Version Number : 6.94 File Name : 20150113_160206.jpg Directory : . File Size : 3 MB File Modification Date/Time : 2015:01:13 19:02:06 File Type : JPEG MIME Type : image/jpeg Make : SAMSUNG Camera Model Name : SG-155 Orientation : Rotate 180 X Resolution : 72 Y Resolution : 72 Resolution Unit : inches Software : A150R2444 Modify Date : 2015:01:13 16:02:05 Y Cb Cr Positioning : Centered Exposure Time : 1/15 F Number : 2.2 Exposure Program : Program AE ISO : 100 Exif Version : 0220 Date/Time Original : 2015:01:13 16:02:05 Create Date : 2015:01:13 16:02:05 Components Configuration : YCbCr Shutter Speed Value : 1/15 Aperture Value : 2.2 Brightness Value : 0.9804687 Exposure Compensation : 0 Max Aperture Value : 2.2 Metering Mode : Center-weighted average Light Source : Unknown (0) Flash : No Flash Focal Length : 4.2mm Warning : [minor] Possibly incorrect User Comment : METADATA-START Flashpix Version : 0100 Color Space : sRGB Exif Image Width : 4128 Exif Image Length : 2322 Interoperability Index : R98 - DCF basic file (sRGB) Interoperability Version : 0100 Sensing Method : One-chip color area Scene Type : Directly photographed Exposure Mode : Auto White Balance : Auto Focal Length In 35mm Format : 31mm Scene Capture Type : Standard Image Unique ID : SA10FMHKE16 Compression : JPEG (old-style) Thumbnail Offset : 5114 Thumbnail Length : 35783 Image Width : 4128 Image Height : 2322 Encoding Process : Baseline DCT, Huffman coding Bits Per Sample : 8 Color Components : 3 Y Cb Cr Sub Sampling : YCbCr4:2:0 (2 2) Aperture : 2.2 Image Size : 4128x2322 Scale Factor To 35mm Equivalent : 7.4 Shutter Speed : 1/15 Thumbnail Image : (Binary data 35783 bytes, use -b option to extract) Circle Of Confusion : 0.004 mm Focal Length : 4.2mm (35mm equivalent: 31.0mm) Hyperfocal Distance : 1.97 m Light Value : 6.2 so we run ffmpeg on the original file, C:\>ffmpeg -i 20150113_160206.jpg output.jpg then we check the output file and see what it says: C:\>exiftool output.jpg ExifTool Version Number : 6.94 File Name : output.jpg Directory : . File Size : 362 kB File Modification Date/Time : 2015:01:15 15:35:05 File Type : JPEG MIME Type : image/jpeg Comment : Lavc55.43.101 Image Width : 4128 Image Height : 2322 Encoding Process : Baseline DCT, Huffman coding Bits Per Sample : 8 Color Components : 3 Y Cb Cr Sub Sampling : YCbCr4:2:0 (2 2) Image Size : 4128x2322 no more metadata. reencoding it, the filesize is much smaller, but the resolution is the same. this makes uploading photos easier, as the filesize is smaller and some sites limit image filesize. 01/13/2015 07:02 PM 3,253,320 20150113_160206.jpg 01/15/2015 03:35 PM 370,403 output.jpg you can also use ffmpeg to resize the photos. ffmpeg -i input.jpg -s 800x600 output.jpg
  19. 1 point
    suneday11

    Posting Clean Pictures Online

    Any updates on data removal? I'd love to do a journal to help/get help from you kind people, but the Internet has me a little worried.
  20. 1 point
    Insomniac

    Posting Clean Pictures Online

    UNIX users can use the 'pnmtools' package to strip out identifying information. For jpeg, it's super easy! you don't even need the pnmutils, just djpeg/cjpeg (which are pretty common) Something like: $ djpeg -pmn <infile.jpg | cjpeg >outfile.jpg $ mv outfile.jpg infile.jpg What this does is convert a jpeg file to an intermediate pnm file, piping it into cjpeg and converts it back to a jpeg. The intermediate pnm format doesn't include identifiable info. The mv is optional, of course. The beauty of this system is that you can easily automate it to strip out exif data from ooodles of jpeg files w/out having to process each one by hand.
  21. 1 point
    hic

    Posting Clean Pictures Online

    Yes I believe this issue is important. I think it is very important. With this data even the picture of your cat from facebook they can find you on here. You need not take a pic of a pot plant the servers already know where you are...correct. In this age of numbers and codes we must learn all we can. I personally do not fear for myself. I however do care for the ones around me and these thieves/criminals are getting smarter as their tools are as well for information gathering. I know nothing of computers much like politics but both seem to influence my life. So I should try to learn a bit more. This thread will help perhaps - thanks mibrians
  22. 1 point
    t-pain

    Posting Clean Pictures Online

    sometimes its easier to hit print screen button, open mspaint (aka paintbrush) and hit paste. then save to a new file. assuming paintbrush doesnt have its own identifying data. instead of print screen button, which will take your whole desktop, you can try using the keyboard or mouse to go to edit > copy when you view your image. or hit ctrl+c on keyboard. open up mspaint and hit ctrl+v or edit>paste with the mouse.
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