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Restorium2

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Posts posted by Restorium2

  1. Overages cannot be sold to a dispensary. It does not matter whether it is a patient that has overages or whether it is a caregiver that has overages, excess marijuana cannot be sold to parties that are not connected to you through the registry process. A caregiver is only allowed to sell it his own patient(s) and patient is not allowed to sell or transfer is medical marijuana to anyone else.

  2. Overages cannot be sold to a dispensary. It does not matter whether it is a patient that has overages or whether it is a caregiver that has overages, excess marijuana cannot be sold to parties that are not connected to you through the registry process. A caregiver is only allowed to sell it his own patient(s) and patient is not allowed to sell or transfer is medical marijuana to anyone else.

  3. The real story;

    Small Indian tribe plans Midwest’s first grow-processing-retail cannabis business

    By Mike Fourcher  | September 24, 2020
    Bay-Mills-Indian-Community.jpg

    Bay Mills Indian Community, a small tribe of about 2,200 members located near Sault Ste. Marie in Michigan’s upper peninsula, announced plans yesterday to build a cannabis grow facility, processing, and dispensary all in one location, with operations starting this fall. The all-in-one location, branded Northern Lights, would be the first of its kind west of the Mississippi. Initially, retail sales would be limited to visitors on tribal lands.

    “We’ve partnered with a Michigan-based cannabis company, Soil to Smoke. They are the expertise coming in to refine what we have in place and to teach us what we don’t already know,” said tribal attorney Whitney Gravelle.

    Bay Mills’ plans have been long underway, says Gravelle. Since the tribe legalized cannabis on tribal lands in April 2019, there have been internal discussions about how to best take advantage of Michigan’s legalization of recreational cannabis. For over a year the tribe, a sovereign nation by treaty with the United States, has been seeking a compact with Michigan’s Marijuana Regulation Agency (MRA) to sync up regulations. Frustrated with their lack of progress with state bureaucrats, Bay Mills decided to go it alone.

    Course-Selection-Ad2-300x600-horz.jpg

    “It’s been more of a long time anticipated approach that we finally had to move forward on because we’re not getting anywhere with our conversations with the State of Michigan,” said Gravelle, who claims the tribe missed out on multiple potential business opportunities since they could not create a compact with the state. Without a compact, cannabis companies operating in Michigan did not want to risk aggravating MRA officials, so they broke off talks with Bay Mills, says Gravelle. 

    Bay Mills already operates a number of businesses, including a resort and casino on Lake Superior and a farm operated by the tribe’s community college that includes a hemp growing pilot program run in conjunction with Michigan State University.

    “Grow operations would include upwards of 12,000 to 15,000 square feet of [indoor] grow operations. That would be a phased approach. We’ll start with about half of it, and as our capacity goes, we’ll add on more,” said Gravelle. “We’re also looking at 110 acres of land [surrounding the indoor site.] We do envision product grown outside.”

    Because the tribe is building a unified grow, processing, and retail location, Bay Mills is counting on significant efficiencies, not to mention a lack of Michigan taxes, which can add up to 16 percent for recreational cannabis. Eventually, if Bay Mills finds other tribes interested in selling their cannabis products, it’s possible they would license it for sale on other tribal lands, but sales off-lands are not under consideration.

    Bay Mills will not use Michigan’s seed to sale tracking system, Metrc, but otherwise it is working to align tribal laws and regulations with Michigan. 

    “We’re not trying to create any jurisdictional issues with what you can sell within the Michigan market. For instance, I think in the state you can have 2.5 ounces on person. That is what the tribe will adopt as well. When it comes to quality control and safety we plan to mirror Michigan,” said Gravelle.

    In contrast to Bay Mills, other Michigan tribes have chosen to merely lease land to already operating Michigan cannabis companies, citing the risk of getting into a complex new business as well as the possibility of aggravating Michigan and federal agencies that don’t look kindly on tribes entering the cannabis business. Gravelle brushes those concerns aside.

    “I think what a lot of what Bay Mills is doing comes down to tribal sovereignty. We are a sovereign government that can rule itself. Through that sovereignty we are engaging in cannabis. That is why we are moving forward essentially,” said Gravelle. “It’s how you make laws for your people.”

  4. 12 hours ago, rambozo420 said:

    Take a real close look and see a guy who lives a simple life. Loves his dog and cat won't see much past that

    You can still be simple and have a thinking brain that takes care.  The most simple thoughts involve self preservation. It's not a Bear however it's a Bear trap. 

  5. 25 minutes ago, JAKEatSOILtoSMOKE said:

    Hello my name is Jake, and i run the buying operations for a company call soil to smoke. Basically what we do is find caregiver product and test it so it can be sold on Indian reservations.  As long as your products can pass a Lab test, witch my company will pay for, then we can do business. looking forward to hearing from some of you! 

    I can be reached at jacob@soiltosmoke.com

    Jake The Fed lol

  6. 22 minutes ago, JAKEatSOILtoSMOKE said:

    Hello my name is Jake, and I run the buying operations for a company call soil to smoke. Basically what we do is find caregiver product and test it so it can be sold on Indian reservations here in Michigan.  As long as your products can pass a Lab test, witch my company will pay for, then we can do business. looking forward to hearing from some of you! I can come to you no matter the distance I am located in Grand Rapids MI.

    I can be reached at jacob@soiltosmoke.com

    Jake The Fed lol

  7. 2 hours ago, Wild Bill said:

    The topic may be old but if the information contained in it is useful to you then it's definitely worth asking questions.

    The only question asked was off topic about CBD products while spamming a few name brands. 

    The reason I said anything was when advice was given and weight was mentioned as a problem and it isn't anymore. 

    Love to make that clear for everyone. All you grow on your 12 is legal to have now. 

    Not on more than 12. Keep the story straight and things will go great. Slip of the lip will sink your ship. 

  8. City of Warren v. Clayton Jamers Bezy

    Clayton Bezy was growing medical marijuana for both himself and his registered patients at his Warren home. He was 100% in compliance with the MMMA, but the city of Warren imposed additional requirements under its ordinance code. Warren issued citations to Bezy for:

    1. Failing to register for safety inspections
    2. Emitting noxious marijuana odors causing a nuisance
    3. Operating a business in violation of the law which is considered a misdemeanor

    Bezy argued that the city’s ordinance requirements directly conflicted with state law and didn’t apply to his lawful caregiver activities. Additionally, he argued that these violations and citations are punishments that a municipality cannot grant. Warren then argued that its requirements didn’t conflict with the MMMA, but rather expanded on its requirements and added safety restrictions.

    Subsequently, the Michigan Court of Appeals sided in favor of Bezy. The Court of Appeals concluded that, “the MMMA prohibits local governments from restricting MMMA-compliant behavior.” The city of Warren’s ordinances were found to, “add ‘a layer of restrictions and regulations’ that restricts [caregiver] cultivation of medical marijuana.” Since the city’s ordinances prohibited what state law allows, the Court found that the ordinances were invalid and didn’t apply to caregiver conduct.

    DeRuiter v. Township of Byron

    This interpretation of the MMMA strongly favors caregiver rights under state law. Based on what the MMMA states, it’s a reasonable conclusion. However, it’s also an unpublished opinion that didn’t come from the Michigan Supreme Court. Therefore, it’s still unclear whether will stand as solid law.

    While the Michigan Court of Appeals has addressed this issue in a couple of cases (Charter Township of York v. Miller; City of Warren v. Bezy), the Michigan Supreme Court completed its decision on one similar case: Ter Beek v. City of Wyoming. This case set the framework in Michigan for preemption cases involving the MMMA and municipalities.

    The Michigan Supreme Court recently agreed to review and decide one case—DeRuiter v. Township of Byron—which contains similar facts as City of Warren v. Bezy. Both cases involve a caregiver’s rights under state law and municipality land use and zoning authority.

    Read more on the decision made by the Michigan Supreme Court on April 27th, 2020. 

    Rights of caregivers under the MMMA

    Currently, a majority of the focus in Michigan is on the Medical Marihuana Facilities Licensing Act (MMFLA) and adult-use establishments under the Michigan Regulation and Taxation of Marihuana Act (MRTMA/Prop 1). However, the MMMA and its caregiver-patient system isn’t going anywhere. Caregivers that wish to grow for their patients in either a residential or industrial-zoned property still exist.

    Caregivers hold the ability to co-exist with licensed facilities and adult-use establishments. It’s only a matter of where those caregivers can grow for their patients. Therefore, this issue is something to keep an eye on and witness how this issue is resolved once and for all.

  9. 14 hours ago, BlancaColucci said:

    If I were you, I would grow a couple at a time. This way, you won't need to worry about the weight. Actually, you'll be fine even if you decide to grow more than 12 plants; at least, that's what I did. But, if you don't want to take the risk, I completely get you! That's totally fine! By the way, do you guys know where I could get myself some natural products with CBD online? I've tried several brands, including the top ones like Five CBD, Zatural, and Aspen Green, but I'd like to try out something cheaper. Please, please, help! Cheers!

    You picked a very old thread to comment on. Laws change. The rec law says you can have all the marijuana you grew off your 12 outdoor plants. The rest of your post is spam I think. Probably the whole reason you posted. 

  10.  

    22 hours ago, rambozo420 said:

    This much concern over a benign plant that has zero deaths attributed to its use. Yet let the Protien Spike fly to point it's going to be Mandatory. Strange Times We are living in. High Hope's for Humanity on this end. Wish You All the Best

    This isn't what we grow or sell to our buds. This is lab created garbage they are trying to regulate. The folks that make it should be sued raggity for less red tape. 

     

    22 hours ago, rambozo420 said:

    They pass all this RED TAPE under the guise of public safety But for anyone with a brain it's all about who makes profits and who don't Its a Fixed Game of Monopoly could Right a book lol

    Because it is possible for chemical contaminants to be generated during the process of converting CBD to ∆8-THC, concern has been raised about the safety of untested or impure ∆8-THC products.[30]

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