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  1. EFFECTIVE OCTOBER 11, 2021 ***** On July 13, 2021, Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer signed legislation making changes to how marijuana is defined and regulated in the state, including products containing synthetic cannabis derivatives. HB 4517 revised the definition under the Michigan Regulation and Taxation of Marihuana Act (MRTMA) to include all compounds containing more than .3% of THC, and creates a new definition of “THC” that includes any tetrahydrocannabolic acid, including synthetically derived products and isomers. The definition of “industrial hemp” was also amended in the Act to be consistent with these changes. HB 4740, 4741, 4742, and 4743, amends the Michigan Medical Marijuana Facilities Licensing Act (MMFLA), the Industrial Hemp Growers Act (Public Act 220 of 2020), the Marihuana Tracking Act, and the Public Health Code. New Definition As a result of these changes, effective October 11, 2021, products containing more than .3% of any THC product, including synthetically derived Delta-8 THC, will be considered “marijuana” products regulated by the state’s marijuana regulatory structure. Marijuana/marihuana is still a Schedule 1 Drug under the Michigan Public Health Code MCL 333.7212. ”Except as provided in subsection (2), Marihuana, including pharmaceutical-grade cannabis” “(2) Marihuana, including pharmaceutical-grade cannabis, is a schedule 2 controlled substance if it is manufactured, obtained, stored, dispensed, possessed, grown, or disposed of in compliance with this act and as authorized by federal authority.” Stay awake – There’s more to come… The post The Definition of Marijuana Has Changed in Michigan appeared first on Michigan Medical Marijuana. View the full article
  2. dwkl

    CANNA JAM

    MUSIC AND COMEDY FESTIVAL SAVE $$ on Tickets NOW TICKETS Tickets can be purchased on Eventbrite www.eventbrite.com/e/canna-jam-tickets-168955818401 DISCOUNT PROMO CODE $10.00 off Promo Code Enter The Word –> TODAY Creative Rec Events presents Michigan’s Comedy and Music Festival FEATURING -Echoes of Pink Floyd- Tribute to Pink Floyd with Laser Light Show -Comedian Mike Young- “Who the F is Mike Young” -Red Wing Great Darren McCarty- Slapstick Comedy TourT Money Green and Roadwork -Randy Kaplan -DJ Joey P -Food, Vendors and more Bring Chairs and Blankets Dress for October in Michigan Ticket links and more info https://www.CannaJamFest.com #cannajam, #cannajamfest, #Tegridylaw #planetgreentreestv #askblanks #comedianmikeyoung #hypeduplive #eventstew #cannatouring #cannaindustries #ozcannabis #purelapeer #stickyypsi #botanicalco #growgreenmi #realleafsolutions #komornlawmi #wellnessdoctorsonline #elevationstationypsi #greeningdetroit #toddlevittlaw The post CANNA JAM appeared first on Michigan Medical Marijuana. View the full article
  3. Are you looking to get licensed in the marijuana industry in Michigan? You really should get prequalified then look for a location that allows it. Komorn Law is one the most sought after licensing and legal firms to hire in the state of Michigan to get you through the process and ready for licensing and business. Many communities in Michigan have opted in to the adult recreational use Michigan Regulation and Taxation of Marihuana Act (MRTMA). There are also many that have opted out. Here we list the communities that have opted in and opted out. We have also listed the MRTMA law broken down by sections. The Marijuana Regulatory Agency (MRA) regulates the state’s adult-use marijuana establishments and licensees in accordance with the Michigan Regulation and Taxation of Marihuana Act (MRTMA) and its associated administrative rules. This document was compiled by Marijuana Regulatory Agency (MRA) staff for informational purposes only. This is a working document that may be revised. Make sure you look at the current update (date) at the top of the document linked. Read the opt-IN list here Read the opt-OUT list here MICHIGAN REGULATION AND TAXATION OF MARIHUANA ACT. The Marijuana Regulatory Agency (MRA) regulates the state’s adult-use marijuana establishments and licensees in accordance with the Michigan Regulation and Taxation of Marihuana Act (MRTMA) and its associated administrative rules. View the law and rules below which have been broken down by sections. Sections 1-2 – The Beginning – Sections 1 and 2 simply establish the reason for the law.Section 3 – DefinitionsSection 4 – Scope of actSection 5 – Lawful activities by person 21 years of age or olderSection 6 – Adoption or enforcement of ordinances by municipality; marihuana establishment local license; annual fee; restrictions on transportation or other facilities prohibited.Section 7-8-9 – (7) Implementation, administration, and enforcement by department; powers; duties; public meetings; annual report. (8) Rules; limitations. (9) License to operate a marihuana establishment; application; qualifications; issuance; disclosure.Section 10 – Lawful activities by marihuana grower, processor, transporter, or retailer; limitations; contracts related to operation of marihuana establishments.Section 11 – Marihuana establishments; requirements; limitations.Section 12-13 – (12) Deduction of certain expenses from income. (13) Imposition of excise tax.Section 14 – Marihuana regulation fund; creation; administration; allocation of expenditures.Section 15 – Violations; penalties.Section 16 – Failure to act by department; application to municipality.Section 17 – Construction of act; effect of federal law; severability. Read the Entire Michigan Regulation and Taxation of Marihuana Act and check on updates. The post Communities in Michigan that have opted IN to adult recreational use appeared first on Michigan Medical Marijuana. View the full article
  4. Are you looking to get licensed in the marijuana industry in Michigan? You need to get prequalified then look for a location that allows it. Komorn Law is one the most sought after licensing and legal firms to hire in the state of Michigan to get you through the process and ready for business. Many communities in Michigan have opted out of the adult recreational use Michigan Regulation and Taxation of Marihuana Act (MRTMA). There are many that have opted in. Here we list the communities that have opted out and opted in as well as the MRTMA law broken down by sections. The Marijuana Regulatory Agency (MRA) regulates the state’s adult-use marijuana establishments and licensees in accordance with the Michigan Regulation and Taxation of Marihuana Act (MRTMA) and its associated administrative rules. This document was compiled by Marijuana Regulatory Agency (MRA) staff for informational purposes only. This is a working document that may be revised. Make sure you look at the current update (date) at the top of the document linked. Read the opt-OUT list here Read the opt-IN list here MICHIGAN REGULATION AND TAXATION OF MARIHUANA ACT. View the law and rules below. Sections 1-2 – The Beginning – Sections 1 and 2 simply establish the reason for the law.Section 3 – DefinitionsSection 4 – Scope of actSection 5 – Lawful activities by person 21 years of age or olderSection 6 – Adoption or enforcement of ordinances by municipality; marihuana establishment local license; annual fee; restrictions on transportation or other facilities prohibited.Section 7-8-9 – (7) Implementation, administration, and enforcement by department; powers; duties; public meetings; annual report. (8) Rules; limitations. (9) License to operate a marihuana establishment; application; qualifications; issuance; disclosure.Section 10 – Lawful activities by marihuana grower, processor, transporter, or retailer; limitations; contracts related to operation of marihuana establishments.Section 11 – Marihuana establishments; requirements; limitations.Section 12-13 – (12) Deduction of certain expenses from income. (13) Imposition of excise tax.Section 14 – Marihuana regulation fund; creation; administration; allocation of expenditures.Section 15 – Violations; penalties.Section 16 – Failure to act by department; application to municipality.Section 17 – Construction of act; effect of federal law; severability. Read the Entire Michigan Regulation and Taxation of Marihuana Act and check on updates because the lawmakers are dipping their fingers in the pie! This advisory bulletin does not constitute legal advice and is subject to change. Licensees are encouraged to seek legal counsel to ensure their operations comply with all applicable laws and rules. Check the MRA website for any changes or updated information LEGAL ADVISORY – Rules, Regulations and laws may have changed after this information was posted. It is up to the reader to research and determine the current status of those items. It is always best to consult an attorney that has experience and is focused on the cannabis industry. One of the most well known law firms in the industry for over 25 years is Komorn Law Other Posts Communities in Michigan that have opted IN to adult recreational use Communities That Have Opted Out of the Adult Use of Marihuana The Marijuana Investigation Division Bulletproof Vests and Body Armor – Michigan Laws Immature Plant Sales Approval Process (Clones) Tags 2019 2020 2021 Adult Recreational Use Adult Use Biden breathalyzer cannabis Caregivers Corona Virus coronavirus Covid 19 datamaster Detroit drugged driving DUI Education Event Governor Whitmer Hemp LARA LARA-BMR Laws legalization Marijuana medical marijuana michigan Michigan Legislature Michigan News MMFLA MMMA MRA MSP News pandemic 2020 patient-caregiver Patients Recreational regulations Release smell taxes USA USA News world news The post Communities That Have Opted Out of the Adult Use of Marihuana appeared first on Michigan Medical Marijuana. View the full article
  5. Whose that knocking on my door? Whose that knocking on my door? … It’s not Barnacle Bill The Sailor It’s the Michigan State Police Marijuana and Tobacco Investigation Division The Marijuana and Tobacco Investigation Section has statewide responsibility for conducting administrative inspections of all retailers of tobacco products as well as all businesses licensed to grow, process, sell, transport, and test medical marijuana. In addition to administrative inspections, the section investigates criminal activity of individuals and businesses who are in violation of the state’s Tobacco Products Tax Act, Marijuana Facilities Licensing Act, and related laws. After a visit from the enforcers you may need an attorney to represent your Catch 22 dilemma. Because the division wasn’t formed to sit around and do nothing … if it’s not something this time – it will be next time. Most recommended and the top cannabis law firm in the state of Michigan also known as Komorn Law will probably be your best bet. Google Search Meanwhile… Meet The Team Michigan State Police Special Investigation Divisions And now for something completely different… No Knock Warrants According to a study from St. John’s Law Review, “Between 2010 and 2016, at least 94 people died during the execution of no-knock search warrants, 13 of whom were police officers.” And that’s not hard to believe when you think about how these surprise visits play out. Take Matthew Stewart, for example, who was asleep in his Utah home on the night of January 4, 2012, when the sound of breaking glass startled him awake, according to an account from his sister. Thinking he was being robbed, he jumped out of bed, threw on his robe and grabbed his gun to defend himself. Stewart said that after being shot at, he shot back, killing one of several plain-clothed officers who began shooting — and injuring several others. After being arrested for murder and branded as a “cop killer,” Stewart committed suicide in jail. In his case, the officers had obtained a no-knock warrant to search his home on suspicion of marijuana possession. One officer was wearing a Cheech and Chong shirt, and the rest were mostly dressed in blue jeans and windbreakers “bearing small police shield emblems.” Read the rest here —> Detroit News LEGAL ADVISORY – Rules, Regulations and laws may have changed after this information was posted. It is up to the reader to research and determine the current status of those items. It is always best to consult an attorney that has experience and is focused on the cannabis industry. One of the most well known law firms in the industry for over 25 years is Komorn Law Other Posts The Marijuana Investigation Division Bulletproof Vests and Body Armor – Michigan Laws Immature Plant Sales Approval Process (Clones) Governor Whitmer Signs Marijuana Legislation Justice Clarence Thomas says federal marijuana laws may no longer be needed Tags 2019 2020 2021 Adult Recreational Use Adult Use Biden breathalyzer cannabis Caregivers Corona Virus coronavirus Covid 19 datamaster Detroit drugged driving DUI Education Event Governor Whitmer Hemp LARA LARA-BMR Laws legalization Marijuana medical marijuana michigan Michigan Legislature Michigan News MMFLA MMMA MRA MSP News pandemic 2020 patient-caregiver Patients Recreational regulations Release smell taxes USA USA News world news The post The Marijuana Investigation Division appeared first on Michigan Medical Marijuana. View the full article
  6. Here is the law in The State of Michigan 750.227g Body armor; purchase, ownership, possession, or use by convicted felon; prohibition; issuance of written permission; violation as felony; definitions. (1) Except as otherwise provided in this section, a person who has been convicted of a violent felony shall not purchase, own, possess, or use body armor. (2) A person who has been convicted of a violent felony whose employment, livelihood, or safety is dependent on his or her ability to purchase, own, possess, or use body armor may petition the chief of police of the local unit of government in which he or she resides or, if he or she does not reside in a local unit of government that has a police department, the county sheriff, for written permission to purchase, own, possess, or use body armor under this section. (3) The chief of police of a local unit of government or the county sheriff may grant a person who properly petitions that chief of police or county sheriff under subsection (2) written permission to purchase, own, possess, or use body armor as provided in this section if the chief of police or county sheriff determines that both of the following circumstances exist: (a) The petitioner is likely to use body armor in a safe and lawful manner. (b) The petitioner has reasonable need for the protection provided by body armor. (4) In making the determination required under subsection (3), the chief of police or county sheriff shall consider all of the following: (a) The petitioner’s continued employment. (b) The interests of justice. (c) Other circumstances justifying issuance of written permission to purchase, own, possess, or use body armor. (5) The chief of police or county sheriff may restrict written permission issued to a petitioner under this section in any manner determined appropriate by that chief of police or county sheriff. If permission is restricted, the chief of police or county sheriff shall state the restrictions in the permission document. (6) It is the intent of the legislature that chiefs of police and county sheriffs exercise broad discretion in determining whether to issue written permission to purchase, own, possess, or use body armor under this section. However, nothing in this section requires a chief of police or county sheriff to issue written permission to any particular petitioner. The issuance of written permission to purchase, own, possess, or use body armor under this section does not relieve any person or entity from criminal liability that might otherwise be imposed. (7) A person who receives written permission from a chief of police or county sheriff to purchase, own, possess, or use body armor shall have that written permission in his or her possession when he or she is purchasing, owning, possessing, or using body armor. (8) A law enforcement agency may issue body armor to a person who is in custody or who is a witness to a crime for his or her own protection without a petition being previously filed under subsection (2). If the law enforcement agency issues body armor to the person under this subsection, the law enforcement agency shall document the reasons for issuing body armor and retain a copy of that document as an official record. The law enforcement agency shall also issue written permission to the person to possess and use body armor under this section. (9) A person who violates this section is guilty of a crime as follows: (a) For a violation of subsection (1), the person is guilty of a felony punishable by imprisonment for not more than 4 years or a fine of not more than $2,000.00, or both. (b) For a violation of subsection (7), the person is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by imprisonment for not more than 93 days or a fine of not more than $100.00, or both. (10) As used in this section: (a) “Body armor” means that term as defined in section 227f. (b) “Violent felony” means that term as defined in section 36 of 1953 PA 232, MCL 791.236. Statute – THE MICHIGAN PENAL CODE (750.1 – 750.568) Section 750.227gHistory: Add. 2000, Act 224, Eff. Oct. 1, 2000 Starting A Cannabis Business Requires Guidance and Legal Support. Komorn Law has been focused on the isssues marijuana legalization for over 25 years and has been involved shaping the future of the new cannabis industry. Call Our Office 248-357-2550 or search Komorn Law 750.227f Committing or attempting to commit crime involving violent act or threat of violent act against another person while wearing body armor as felony; penalty; consecutive term of imprisonment; exception; definitions. Sec. 227f. (1) Except as provided in subsection (2), an individual who commits or attempts to commit a crime that involves a violent act or a threat of a violent act against another person while wearing body armor is guilty of a felony, punishable by imprisonment for not more than 4 years, or a fine of not more than $2,000.00, or both. A term of imprisonment imposed for violating this section may be served consecutively to any term of imprisonment imposed for the crime committed or attempted. (2) Subsection (1) does not apply to either of the following: (a) A peace officer of this state or another state, or of a local unit of government of this state or another state, or of the United States, performing his or her duties as a peace officer while on or off a scheduled work shift as a peace officer. (b) A security officer performing his or her duties as a security officer while on a scheduled work shift as a security officer. (3) As used in this section: (a) “Body armor” means clothing or a device designed or intended to protect an individual’s body or a portion of an individual’s body from injury caused by a firearm. (b) “Security officer” means an individual lawfully employed to physically protect another individual or to physically protect the property of another person. History: Add. 1990, Act 321, Eff. Mar. 28, 1991 ;– Am. 1992, Act 218, Imd. Eff. Oct. 13, 1992 ;– Am. 1996, Act 163, Imd. Eff. Apr. 11, 1996 ;– Am. 2000, Act 226, Eff. Oct. 1, 2000 Statute – THE MICHIGAN PENAL CODE (750.1 – 750.568) Section 750.227f See the federal law here Then there is this Responsible Body Armor Possession Act This bill prohibits the purchase, ownership, or possession of enhanced body armor by civilians. Enhanced body armor refers to body armor, including a helmet or shield, the ballistic resistance of which meets or exceeds the ballistic performance of Type III armor, determined using the National Institute of Justice standard. The bill provides exceptions for (1) the purchase, ownership, or possession by or under the authority of the United States or any state or political subdivision; (2) qualified law enforcement officers; and (3) enhanced body armor that was lawfully possessed before the effective date of the bill. A violator is subject to criminal penalties—a fine, a prison term of up to 10 years, or both. [Congressional Record Volume 165, Number 157 (Friday, September 27, 2019)] [House] From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov] By Ms. MENG: H.R. 4568. Congress has the power to enact this legislation pursuant to the following: Article I, Section 8, Clause 18 of the Constitution [Page H8082] About Constitutional Authority Statements On January 5, 2011, the House of Representatives adopted an amendment to House Rule XII. Rule XII, clause 7(c) requires that, to be accepted for introduction by the House Clerk, all bills (H.R.) and joint resolutions (H.J.Res.) must provide a document stating “as specifically as practicable the power or powers granted to Congress in the Constitution to enact the bill or joint resolution.” https://www.congress.gov/bill/116th-congress/house-bill/4568/text LEGAL ADVISORY – Rules, Regulations and laws may have changed after this information was posted. It is up to the reader to research and determine the current status of those items. It is always best to consult an attorney that has experience and is focused on the cannabis industry. One of the most well known law firms in the industry for over 25 years is Komorn Law Other Posts Bulletproof Vests and Body Armor – Michigan Laws Immature Plant Sales Approval Process (Clones) Governor Whitmer Signs Marijuana Legislation Justice Clarence Thomas says federal marijuana laws may no longer be needed Marijuana Regulatory Agency, Michigan’s Electric Companies Guidance for Home Grows. Tags 2019 2020 2021 Adult Recreational Use Adult Use Biden breathalyzer cannabis Caregivers Corona Virus coronavirus Covid 19 datamaster Detroit drugged driving DUI Education Event Governor Whitmer Hemp LARA LARA-BMR Laws legalization Marijuana medical marijuana michigan Michigan Legislature Michigan News MMFLA MMMA MRA MSP News pandemic 2020 patient-caregiver Patients Recreational regulations Release smell taxes USA USA News world news The post Bulletproof Vests and Body Armor – Michigan Laws appeared first on Michigan Medical Marijuana. View the full article
  7. The administrative rules for marijuana businesses provide a pathway for cultivators – any type of grower under the Medical Marihuana Facilities Licensing Act or the Michigan Regulation and Taxation of Marihuana Act – to transfer or sell immature plants to marijuana sales locations (provisioning centers, retailers, and microbusinesses). The administrative rules also provide a pathway for marijuana sales locations to sell immature plants to customers. This bulletin provides information regarding the relevant administrative rules and requirements that licensed cultivators and licensed sales locations need to begin the sale of immature plants Administrative Rules: Immature Plants Rule 1 of the Marijuana Sampling and Testing Rule Set – R 420.301 (k) – a nonflowering marijuana plant that is no taller than 8 inches from the growing or cultivating medium and no wider than 8 inches produced from a cutting, clipping, tissue culture, or seedling that is in a growing or cultivating medium or in a growing or cultivating container. Rule 6 in the Marijuana Operations Rule Set – R 420.206 (2) – a cultivator who has obtained good agricultural collection processes certification may sell immature plants to a marijuana sales location under the allowances published by the agency. Rule 6 in the Marijuana Sale or Transfer Rule Set – R 420.506 (4) – a marijuana sales location may sell no more than 3 immature plants to a marijuana customer per transaction. Requirements for Cultivators A cultivator must meet/comply with the following requirements to sell immature plants: Hold the good agricultural collection practices (GACP-GMP) certification prior to making sales of immature plants.For immature plant sales, use the existing “immature plants” category in Metrc with testing status “not required.” These sales are for immature plants only and should not be used to transfer or sell seeds.Only transfer pre-ordered immature plants (plant packages) to sales locations.Once immature plants have been pre-ordered, include a sell-by date on the package label to ensure plants at sales locations do not advance in their growth beyond the immature growth phase. The sell-by date must be no more than seven days from the date the plant package was created at the cultivator.Ensure each transfer of immature plants to a sales location includes written instructions for basic care and environmental considerations for the immature plants (light, water, temperature controls) while they are at the sales location, and the method for destruction if necessary, such as if the plants develop disease, or die.Ensure each transfer of immature plants to a sales location includes a written, signed document from the cultivator attesting that only active ingredients approved by the Marijuana Regulatory Agency (MRA) were used in the cultivation of the immature plants. The bulletin that details the MRA’s approved active ingredients for growers can be found here. Approval Process for Growers/Cultivators Once a cultivator has achieved certification for GACP-GMP, they must submit a plan for the sale of immature plants to the MRA at MRA-Compliance@michigan.gov before selling any immature plants to a sales location. The plan must include, at a minimum: The name of the business and the cultivator’s license numberProof the cultivator is GACP-GMP certifiedA copy of the general care instructions the cultivator will provide to sales locationsStandard Operating Procedures (SOPs) that includes the following, at a minimum:• How the cultivator will ensure plants have been pre-ordered and how plants will be packaged for transfer Plants will need to be packaged in plant packages for each sales transaction Each plant package will consist of one to three plants depending on the individual customer pre-order There can be no more than three plants per package in accordance with the administrative rules Plant package labels must include the license number of the cultivator, plant strain name, and sell-by date • A detailed description of the method of transportation to sales locations A secure transporter is not necessary for these transfers The wholesale transfer type will be used in the transfer manifest The means by which the cultivator will ensure the plants are not exposed to contaminants or hazards during the transport must be provided The procedure that will be followed during transportation of the immature plants • Refund and return policies if sales locations request to return immature plants in their inventory Provisioning centers are not permitted to return products to growers. Only adult-use retailers can return immature plants to growers. The MRA will review the plan and provide approval, request additional information, or request changes to the proposed plan. Once the plan has been approved, the cultivator may begin the sale of immature plants to marijuana sales locations. Requirements for Sales Locations Sales locations are permitted to accept transfers of immature plants from cultivators approved by the MRA to sell immature plants to a sales location. Sales locations should adhere to the basic care instructions provided by the cultivators. These may include instructions for adequate lighting, water, and temperature control but should not include advanced care instructions such as application of fertilizers, pesticides, etc. Sales locations do not need to obtain approval from the MRA to sell immature plants, but they must adhere to the administrative rules and the following requirements: • Sales locations must have a procedure in place for pre-orders of immature plants • Each plant a sales location orders from a cultivator must be accounted for in a pre-ordered sale • If a pre-ordered sale occurs but the customer does not attempt to collect the immature plant(s) purchased, the sales location is responsible for initiating the return/refund policy set by the cultivator and destruction of any plants that remain beyond the sell-by date • Sales locations must ensure customers are provided a copy of the information provided by the cultivator that attests that only approved active ingredients for growers were used on the immature plants • Upon sale of the immature plants to a customer, the plants must be placed in a sealed package/bag to exit the sales location • Sales locations must notify customers that the plants are not required to be, and have not been, safety compliance tested. MRA Document This advisory bulletin does not constitute legal advice and is subject to change. Licensees are encouraged to seek legal counsel to ensure their operations comply with all applicable laws and rules. Check the MRA website for any changes or updated information Komorn Law PLLC – Contact our office for legal consultation or evaluation (248) 357-2550 The post Immature Plant Sales Approval Process (Clones) appeared first on Michigan Medical Marijuana. View the full article
  8. Governor Whitmer Signs Marijuana Legislation Putting Michiganders’ Health and Safety First July 13, 2021, Governor Whitmer signed legislation that protects the public health and safety of Michigan residents by regulating the intoxicating substance delta-8 THC derivative that is currently being sold – untested and unregulated – in convenience stores, gas stores, and tobacco/smoke shops throughout the state. Starting on October 11, 2021 Starting on October 11, 2021, these products – which were available for sale to individuals of all ages by businesses that cannot currently sell licensed adult-use or medical marijuana products – will be covered by state law and regulated by the state’s Marijuana Regulatory Agency (MRA). This package of bills also updates definitions regarding products derived from the cannabis plant so that all intoxicating substances will be safety-tested through the MRA’s statewide monitoring system and will tracked through the state’s seed-to-sale tracking system. “This package of bills continues to show Michigan is the model for the nation in regard to protecting its residents and making sure that those who consume marijuana products do so in a safe manner,” said Gov. Whitmer. “I am glad to see Michigan continuing to lead on the implementation and regulation of a safe, secure marijuana industry, which has already brought tens of millions of dollars in new tax revenue to the state, as well as thousands of well-paying jobs.” “The team at the MRA has always been committed to transparency and forward thinking and this was once again the case regarding delta-8,” said MRA Executive Director Andrew Brisbo. “We were proud to work with legislators and industry stakeholders to pro-actively address this issue and move an untested, unlicensed intoxicating synthetic product into our licensed and regulated system.” “The voters of Michigan chose to legalize and regulate marijuana in the interests of justice and public health,” said Rep. Yousef Rabhi, D-Ann Arbor. “We know that banning these substances is not the best way to keep the public safe. But we also know that these psychoactive compounds are currently being sold with no public health standards to anyone, regardless of age. Instead of allowing these new hemp derivatives like Delta 8 to circumvent our world-class regulated system, this new law will apply the same rigorous testing and commercial standards that currently protect consumer safety in the legal marijuana marketplace.” “I appreciate the support of Governor Whitmer and my legislative partner Representative Rabhi in helping Michigan take an important step in streamlining regulations for the safety of cannabis businesses and people around our state,” said Rep. Jim Lilly, R-Park Twp. “By mirroring Michigan’s existing liquor dram shop law and clearly defining the requirements for a proper injury lawsuit, we are bringing clarity to a previously murky area of our cannabis laws. I am extremely excited to see the Governor not only sign these bills, but also sign bills to protect Michigander’s from unregulated and untested Delta-8 hemp products. This legislation does the right thing by taking these products out of the unregulated marketplace and bringing them under the purview of a well-functioning Marijuana Regulatory Agency.” “We applaud Governor Whitmer’s decision to sign this package of bills into law,” said Robin Schneider, Executive Director of the Michigan Cannabis Industry Association. “Regulating Delta 8 rather than banning the product is a smart and progressive move that is in the best interest of public health and safety. We are grateful that medical marijuana patients will have improved access to their certifying physicians and that state licensed cannabis businesses will have clearer standards and improved liability insurance coverage.” “The U.S. Hemp Roundtable, the hemp industry’s national advocacy organization, applauds Governor Whitmer and legislative leaders for developing a sound, common-sense approach to regulating delta-8 THC products that will not only serve Michigan residents well, but will also provide a model for the nation,” said Jonathan Miller, General Counsel of the U.S. Hemp Roundtable. “House Bill 4517 ensures that intoxicating products are not sold at retail stores, under the guise of hemp; rather that they are regulated akin to adult-use cannabis, restricted to adults and monitored for safety and potency. The Lawyer that Lawyers Consult on Marijuana Laws and Business – Komorn Law Legal Defense and Cannabis Business Services – (248) 357-2550 KomornLaw.com House Bill 4745 House Bill 4745 will allow telemedicine for Michigan residents participating in the Michigan Medical Marijuana Program, a state registry program that administers the MMMA as approved by Michigan voters on November 4, 2008. “I’m thrilled that medical marijuana patients now have access to telemedicine, just like the rest of Michigan’s medical patients do,” said Gov. Whitmer. “This package of bills makes a huge difference in the lives of those who rely on the medical properties of marijuana.” HB 4745 was sponsored by Rep. Jim Lilly, R-Park Twp., and a copy can be found here. House Bill 4517 House Bill 4517 amends the Michigan Regulation and Taxation of Marihuana Act to: Define “THC” and modify the definitions of “industrial hemp” and “marihuana” Require the MRA to promulgate a limit on the total amount of THC that a product intended for human or animal consumption could contain Allow the MRA to promulgate rules to exclude from the definition of THC a tetrahydrocannabinol if the MRA determined, based on specified factors, that it did not have a potential for abuse HB 4517 was sponsored by Rep. Yousef Rabhi, D-Ann Arbor, and a copy can be found here. House Bill 4740 House Bill 4740 amends the Medical Marihuana Facilities Licensing Act to modify the definitions of “industrial hemp”, “marihuana”, and “marihuana-infused product.” HB 4740 was sponsored by Rep. Pat Outman, R-Six Lakes, and a copy can be found here. House Bill 4741 House Bill 4741 amends the Industrial Hemp Growers Act to modify the definitions of “industrial hemp” and “marihuana”, and defined “THC.” HB 4741 was sponsored by Rep. TC Clements, R-Temperance, and a copy can be found here. House Bill 4742 House Bill 4742 amends the Marihuana Tracking Act to modify the definition of “marihuana.” HB 4742 was sponsored by Rep. Tenisha Yancey, D-Grosse Pointe, and a copy can be found here. House Bill 4743 House Bill 4743 amends the Public Health Code to modify the definitions of “marihuana” and “industrial hemp.” HB 4743 was sponsored by Rep. Julie Calley, R-Portland, and a copy can be found here. House Bill 4744 House Bill 4744 amends the Industrial Hemp Research and Development Act to modify the definitions of “industrial hemp” and “THC.” HB 4744 was sponsored by Rep. Richard Steenland, D-Roseville, and a copy can be found here. House Bill 4746 House Bill 4746 amends the Michigan Liquor Control Code to modify the definition of “marihuana.” HB 4746 was sponsored by Rep. Roger Hauck, R-Mt. Pleasant, and a copy can be found here. In case you missed it… Schumer: Marijuana legalization will be a Senate priorityStudy details correlation between legalizing marijuana and increasing home valuesDriver crashes into marijuana dispensary near Holland LEGAL ADVISORY – Rules, Regulations and laws may have changed after this information was posted. It is up to the reader to research and determine the current status of those items. It is always best to consult an attorney that has experience and is focused on the cannabis industry. One of the most well known law firms in the industry for over 25 years is Komorn Law Other Posts Governor Whitmer Signs Marijuana Legislation Justice Clarence Thomas says federal marijuana laws may no longer be needed Marijuana Regulatory Agency, Michigan’s Electric Companies Guidance for Home Grows. Detroiters could be voting on reparations for residents UAW calling for General Motors to cease testing for marijuana During worker shortage and raise starting wage Tags 2019 2020 2021 Adult Recreational Use Adult Use Biden breathalyzer cannabis Caregivers Corona Virus coronavirus Covid 19 datamaster Detroit drugged driving DUI Education Event Governor Whitmer Hemp LARA LARA-BMR Laws legalization Marijuana medical marijuana michigan Michigan Legislature Michigan News MMFLA MMMA MRA MSP News pandemic 2020 patient-caregiver Patients Recreational regulations Release smell taxes USA USA News world news The post Governor Whitmer Signs Marijuana Legislation appeared first on Michigan Medical Marijuana. View the full article
  9. June 28 (UPI) — Federal regulations on marijuana may “no longer be necessary” as individual states enact their own laws on its use and sale, Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas wrote in an opinion Monday. Thomas, one of the high court’s most conservative justices, cited what he called the federal government’s “half-in, half-out” approach that “simultaneously tolerates and forbids local use of marijuana” and concludes that federal pot laws and policies may now be obsolete. “A prohibition on intrastate use or cultivation of marijuana may no longer be necessary or proper to support the federal government’s piecemeal approach,” he wrote in dismissing the appeal of a Colorado medical marijuana dispensary that was denied federal tax breaks. In the case, Standing Akimbo vs. United States, the dispensary argued that it is prohibited by the Internal Revenue Service from deducting certain business expenses — as other businesses are allowed — even though it operates in Colorado, where marijuana use is legal. The reason is an IRS public policy provision that bars such deductions for companies dealing in controlled substances. With 36 states now legally allowing marijuana for medical use and 18 for recreational use, Thomas wrote that the case illustrates a growing disconnect between federal and state laws. Since the Supreme Court upheld federal marijuana laws in 2005, Thomas said the legal landscape has greatly changed. Further, he said, the Justice Department since 2009 has declined to intrude on state legalization efforts or prosecute those who comply with state laws. Read More Here LEGAL ADVISORY – Rules, Regulations and laws may have changed after this information was posted. It is up to the reader to research and determine the current status of those items. It is always best to consult an attorney that has experience and is focused on the cannabis industry. One of the most well known law firms in the industry for over 25 years is Komorn Law Other Posts Justice Clarence Thomas says federal marijuana laws may no longer be needed Marijuana Regulatory Agency, Michigan’s Electric Companies Guidance for Home Grows. Detroiters could be voting on reparations for residents UAW calling for General Motors to cease testing for marijuana During worker shortage and raise starting wage Officials Celebrate First Criminal Record Expungapalooza Tags 2019 2020 2021 Adult Recreational Use Adult Use Biden breathalyzer cannabis Caregivers coronavirus Corona Virus Covid 19 datamaster Detroit drugged driving DUI Education Event Hemp israel LARA LARA-BMR Laws legalization Marijuana medical marijuana michigan Michigan Legislature Michigan News MMFLA MMMA MRA MSP News pandemic 2020 patient-caregiver Patients Recreational regulations Release smell taxes USA USA News world news The post Justice Clarence Thomas says federal marijuana laws may no longer be needed appeared first on Michigan Medical Marijuana. View the full article
  10. June 25, 2021 – Michigan’s Marijuana Regulatory Agency – in conjunction with the Michigan Public Service Commission, the Bureau of Fire Services, the Dept. of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy, and electric providers in the state of Michigan – today produced and distributed materials to inform Michigan residents growing marijuana in their homes about the best ways to keep themselves, their neighbors, and their community safe while continuing to protect Michigan’s electric grid. Michigan residents with medical marijuana patient and caregiver registration cards have been able to grow a limited number of marijuana plants in their homes since 2008. After Michigan voters legalized marijuana in 2018, Michigan residents over the age of 21 have also been able to grow up to 12 plants at their home. These developments have resulted in an influx of new residential marijuana grows that have a major impact on Michigan’s electric grid. Since the energy demand for growing marijuana plants is so intensive – often requiring nonstop grow lights, ventilation systems, and other high-demand equipment – it is essential residential marijuana growers understand the impact the increased energy usage in their homes may have on their safety, the safety of their communities, and the safety of electrical workers and first responders. A Michigan resident growing 12 plants in a home can increase that home’s energy demand by 2.75 times. Maximizing the 72-plant limit for a medical marijuana caregiver’s residential grow operation could result in energy usage equivalent to the average use of 10.75 houses. Residential marijuana growers should understand the proper steps to take while planning their grow operation to ensure their safety, as well as the protection of their home and utility equipment. Overloading electrical equipment can create fire hazards and damage electrical equipment, which can also lead to extended power outages in your community. Growing marijuana in a home is a legal right and it must be done safely and responsibly. Before starting a home grow, individuals should: become familiar with local rules and ordinanceshire a licensed electrical contractorcontact their local utility to ensure their electrical service is sized appropriately to serve the increased energy demandWhen residential growers work together with their electric company, significant damage can be avoided, including: Unanticipated significant overloading can lead to catastrophic failure of utility and customer-owned equipment. If a significant customer load is added before the energy provider has an opportunity to review and utility equipment is damaged as a result, the customer causing the issue may be held responsible for associated costs of repair. There could be lengthy delays in the restoration of service. The utility must determine what caused the issue, find out what the true load sizes are, and upgrade its equipment to serve it.In addition to damaging the equipment of the customer that added the significant load, there could be possible damage to property of other customers receiving service from the same transformer. This damage can range from appliances to sensitive electronics, smart TVs, computers and more.Structural fire dangers are by far the worst-case scenario for marijuana home grows. When circuits are overloaded beyond their rating, it becomes a hazard and the cost associated with this kind of incident is immeasurable as it has the potential to cause death in addition to widespread damage to the electrical system and people’s property.The Michigan Public Service Commission’s website has important information available for Michigan residents, including: Contact Information for Michigan’s Electric UtilitiesMPSC’s Utility Provider Search (Geographic Lookup)Michigan’s Electric Utility Service Area MapThe Electrical Safety: Residential Growing informational document can be found here or by visiting Michigan.gov/MRA. PAST MRA Releases June 25 In Partnership with the Marijuana Regulatory Agency, Michigan’s Electric Providers Offer Advice for Marijuana Home Grows17 Marijuana Regulatory Agency Announces June Business Resource Workshop, Featuring Our Cannabis10 Michigan’s Marijuana Regulatory Agency Announces its June Education and Outreach Session Featuring a Presentation by the MRA’s Enforcement Team01 2021 Veteran Marijuana Research Grant Program RFP Now AvailableMay 13 MRA Business Resource Workshop: Setting Aside Marijuana-Related Adult Criminal Records in Michigan04 Licensing and Social Equity Work GroupApril 29 MRA’s Social Equity Program Announces May Business Resource Workshop, Featuring Rocky Mountain Cannabis Consulting19 MRA’s Social Equity Program Announces April Business Resource Workshop, Featuring Sensi ConnectsMarch 12 MRA’s Social Equity Program Announces March Business Resource Workshop, Featuring Calyxeum05 MRA’s Social Equity Program Announces March Education and Outreach Session, Featuring the MRA Enforcement DivisionFebruary 26 MRA Reminds Applicants of Upcoming License Eligibility Changes18 MRA’s Social Equity Program Announces February Business Resource Workshop, Featuring Our Cannabis02 MRA Takes Next Step Towards Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion by Posting Adult-Use Marijuana Licensees’ Social Equity PlansJanuary 29 MRA’s Social Equity Program Announces February Business Resource Workshop, Featuring Cresco Labs21 Marijuana Regulatory Agency Announces Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Workgroup19 Marijuana Regulatory Agency Issues Final Recommendations of the Racial Equity Advisory Workgroup06 MRA’s Social Equity Program Announces January Education and Outreach Session, Featuring Maurice Morton LEGAL ADVISORY – Rules, Regulations and laws may have changed after this information was posted. It is up to the reader to research and determine the current status of those items. It is always best to consult an attorney that has experience and is focused on the cannabis industry. One of the most well known law firms in the industry for over 25 years is Komorn Law Other Posts Justice Clarence Thomas says federal marijuana laws may no longer be needed Marijuana Regulatory Agency, Michigan’s Electric Companies Guidance for Home Grows. Detroiters could be voting on reparations for residents UAW calling for General Motors to cease testing for marijuana During worker shortage and raise starting wage Officials Celebrate First Criminal Record Expungapalooza Tags 2019 2020 2021 Adult Recreational Use Adult Use Biden breathalyzer cannabis Caregivers coronavirus Corona Virus Covid 19 datamaster Detroit drugged driving DUI Education Event Hemp israel LARA LARA-BMR Laws legalization Marijuana medical marijuana michigan Michigan Legislature Michigan News MMFLA MMMA MRA MSP News pandemic 2020 patient-caregiver Patients Recreational regulations Release smell taxes USA USA News world news The post Marijuana Regulatory Agency, Michigan’s Electric Companies Guidance for Home Grows. appeared first on Michigan Medical Marijuana. View the full article
  11. DETROIT (FOX 2) – A growing group of Detroiters call for the city to provide reparations. The ballot measure would take funds from legalized marijuana to pay for them. FOX 2: “How many signatures are needed to get this on the ballot?” “A little bit more than 3,600 signatures,” said Todd Perkins, attorney. FOX 2: “And how many do you have?” “We are close to 4,000.” And come November Detroiters may vote on whether the city provides reparations to its African-American residents. “It’s the biggest, blackest city yet you still see an economic divide,” Perkins said. “A gap that is significant and it has not been quelled.” Perkins is part of a grassroots effort that would allow Detroit voters to change the city’s charter giving the people the right to pass legislation to earmark city funds. He says it would be a game-changer for Detroit in which 30 percent of its residents live below the poverty line. “It’s also a very symbolic thing – it’s an acknowledgment. Everybody can acknowledge slavery is wrong and everybody can say I’m sorry, but words mean action,” Perkins said. FOX 2: “Ideally, where would this money come from?” “Ideally this money would come from marijuana revenue,” he said. “As much as people may have been against recreational marijuana in the city of Detroit, there is now going to be revenue that’s generated from that. There’s revenue that’s going to be returned to the city from the state, and we would like to capture that money. “Right now it hasn’t been allocated.” There’s been a big push for reparations in Detroit. The city’s charter commission proposal calls for a task force on the issue. City Council President Pro-Tem Mary Sheffield is tweaking a resolution that will come to a vote on Tuesday. Perkins says if the petition drive is successful and the issue ends up on the ballot, it could draw more Detroiters to the polls in November when they vote to keep or replace Mayor Mike Duggan and city council members. Starting A Cannabis Business Requires Guidance and Legal Support. Komorn Law has been focused on the isssues marijuana legalization for over 25 years and has been involved shaping the future of the new cannabis industry. Call Our Office 248-357-2550 or search Komorn Law Attorney Todd Perklins says he has enough signatures to get reparations on the ballot for November. “I think it’ll increase voter turnout. it may even increase a divide,” Perkins said. “But even with a divide look at what we had, we had one of the greatest turnouts last November because of the divide we saw in this country – and that’s a good thing.” Sheffield plans to hold a press conference on Friday to address the issue. https://www.fox2detroit.com/news/detroiters-could-be-voting-on-reparations-for-black-residents-thanks-to-grassroots-effort Trending on FOX2 Detroit Warren Police seek 5 women, offer $3,000 reward after woman shot to death at partyMan dumps 80K pennies of child support in yard, daughter donates to charityReparations in Detroit, a $300 bonus for Michigan workers, tree cutting in LivoniaWhitmer wants to use $300 bonus unemployment check as a back-to-work incentive for Michigan workers‘Broken to Blessed’: Uber driver graduates from college, writes book after passenger pays initial school debt LEGAL ADVISORY – Rules, Regulations and laws may have changed after this information was posted. It is up to the reader to research and determine the current status of those items. It is always best to consult an attorney that has experience and is focused on the cannabis industry. One of the most well known law firms in the industry for over 25 years is Komorn Law Other Posts Detroiters could be voting on reparations for residents UAW calling for General Motors to cease testing for marijuana During worker shortage and raise starting wage Officials Celebrate First Criminal Record Expungapalooza Michigan House Passes Bill to Close Loophole in Marijuana Legislation Michigan State Police and Ingham County ‘reckless’ to rely on informant in false drug arrest Tags 2019 2020 2021 Adult Recreational Use Adult Use Biden breathalyzer cannabis Caregivers coronavirus Corona Virus Covid 19 datamaster Detroit drugged driving DUI Education Event Hemp israel LARA LARA-BMR Laws legalization Marijuana medical marijuana michigan Michigan Legislature Michigan News MMFLA MMMA MRA MSP News pandemic 2020 patient-caregiver Patients Recreational regulations Release smell taxes USA USA News world news The post Detroiters could be voting on reparations for residents appeared first on Michigan Medical Marijuana. View the full article
  12. General Motors is having trouble finding employees for two of its busiest assembly plants and the UAW calls for GM to cease drug testing for cannabis. The company is looking to hire 400 temporary employees for its Flint assembly plant and another 275 temporary employees in Fort Wayne. But when the company conducted a job fair in Fort Wayne two weeks ago, it attracted just 60 applicants, or only 22% of the Indiana plant’s needs. While finding employees is an issue plaguing many businesses, UAW officials for GM’s Flint and Fort Wayne plants believe the solution is quite simple — stop testing for marijuana, and raise the starting wage. UAW Local 598 Shop Chairman Eric Welter told the Detroit Free Press he believes that marijuana testing is a deterrent and many applicants don’t return after finding out about the mandatory testing. “When you have a line of people waiting for a job, then it’s OK to test for it,” Welter told the Detroit Free Press. “But if you don’t have enough candidates, testing for marijuana might turn people off from applying.” Michigan voters approved cannabis use for medicinal purposes in 2008 and for recreational use for adults age 21 and older in 2018. GM conducts hair follicle tests on its potential employees, which unlike a urine sample, can detect marijuana dating back several weeks. While the strand test was once considered a foolproof testing method for marijuana use, the current laws surrounding hemp and cannabis could disrupt testing accuracy. Starting A Cannabis Business Requires Guidance and Legal Support. Komorn Law has been focused on the isssues marijuana legalization for over 25 years and has been involved shaping the future of the new cannabis industry. Call Our Office 248-357-2550 or search Komorn Law Plus, CBD products, which don’t get you high, are legal in the state of Michigan and available at many retail establishments. A 2012 study in the Journal of Analytical Toxicology found that CBD can produce a false positive for THC. Not only does strand testing weed out otherwise qualified candidates, it could disqualify innocent ones. While drug testing serves as a detractor, the company’s starting wage of $16.67 may also turn off many applicants. Rich LeTourneau, shop chairman at GM’s Fort Wayne Assembly, told the Detroit Free Press the recent increase in pay at other establishments has made GM look less appealing to applicants. LeTourneau says an increase in wages would help draw people to apply. “What really needs to happen is lift that $16.67 cap and hire them in at $18, LeTourneau told the Detroit Free Press. “Pizza Hut is paying $20 an hour to deliver pizza here.” Though GM has continued to set up job fairs and promote employment opportunities online, they have not commented on the union’s ideas to appeal to more applicants. GM Spokesperson Dan Flores told the Free Press the issues were being discussed internally. Stay connected with Detroit Metro Times. Subscribe to our newsletters, and follow us on Google News, Apple News, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, or Reddit. Source: https://www.metrotimes.com/detroit/uaw-calls-for-gm-to-drop-drug-testing-for-pot-amid-worker-shortage-raise-starting-wage/Content?oid=27378805 LEGAL ADVISORY – Rules, Regulations and laws may have changed after this information was posted. It is up to the reader to research and determine the current status of those items. It is always best to consult an attorney that has experience and is focused on the cannabis industry. One of the most well known law firms in the industry for over 25 years is Komorn Law Other Posts UAW calling for General Motors to cease testing for marijuana During worker shortage and raise starting wage Officials Celebrate First Criminal Record Expungapalooza Michigan House Passes Bill to Close Loophole in Marijuana Legislation Michigan State Police and Ingham County ‘reckless’ to rely on informant in false drug arrest Federal ruling looms in legal challenge to Detroit’s recreational pot law Tags 2019 2020 2021 Adult Recreational Use Adult Use Biden breathalyzer cannabis Caregivers coronavirus Corona Virus Covid 19 datamaster drugged driving DUI Education Event FDA Hemp israel LARA LARA-BMR Laws legalization Marijuana medical marijuana michigan Michigan Legislature Michigan News MMFLA MMMA MRA MSP News pandemic 2020 patient-caregiver Patients Recreational regulations Release smell taxes USA USA News world news The post UAW calling for General Motors to cease testing for marijuana During worker shortage and raise starting wage appeared first on Michigan Medical Marijuana. View the full article
  13. “Let’s Do This!” Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel shouted at the kickoff of a criminal record expungement fair in Flint on Wednesday. Governor Gretchen Whitmer and Lt. Governor Garlin Gilchrist joined Attorney General Dana Nessel, Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson, Congressman Dan Kildee and Genesee County Sheriff Christopher Swanson in Flint for the state’s first expungement event since the governor signed the Clean Slate bills into law. During her 2018 campaign, Governor Whitmer made expungement for marijuana convictions one of her key priorities. Upon taking office, Governor Whitmer worked with the Republican-majority legislature to pass crucial Clean Slate legislation that will help thousands of Michiganders gain employment, housing and education. “Clean Slate legislation is crucial for Michiganders who are seeking opportunities for employment, housing, and more,” said Governor Whitmer. “Expungement is an opportunity to grow our workforce and expand access to job training and education for so many people. Let’s recommit ourselves to empowering every Michigander to pursue their potential as we emerge from the pandemic and turbocharge our economic recovery. ” Michiganders are encouraged to check their eligibility and apply to participate in an expungement fair. Read the rest here FYI – You should not wait for it to magically be wiped away. You are going to have to take the initiative to wipe it away because … you know… You just gotta make sure it’s done. LEGAL ADVISORY – Rules, Regulations and laws may have changed after this information was posted. It is up to the reader to research and determine the current status of those items. It is always best to consult an attorney that has experience and is focused on the cannabis industry. One of the most well known law firms in the industry for over 25 years is Komorn Law Other Posts Officials Celebrate First Criminal Record Expungapalooza Michigan House Passes Bill to Close Loophole in Marijuana Legislation Michigan State Police and Ingham County ‘reckless’ to rely on informant in false drug arrest Federal ruling looms in legal challenge to Detroit’s recreational pot law Marijuana Use Tax – Michigan House Bill 4085 Tags 2019 2020 2021 Adult Recreational Use Adult Use Biden breathalyzer cannabis Caregivers coronavirus Corona Virus Covid 19 datamaster drugged driving DUI Education Event FDA Hemp israel LARA LARA-BMR Laws legalization Marijuana medical marijuana michigan Michigan Legislature Michigan News MMFLA MMMA MRA MSP News pandemic 2020 patient-caregiver Patients Recreational regulations Release smell taxes USA USA News world news The post Officials Celebrate First Criminal Record Expungapalooza appeared first on Michigan Medical Marijuana. View the full article
  14. The Michigan House has passed legislation that would close a loophole allowing the sale of unregulated THC products. Currently, some products use THC from marijuana, but are not regulated the same way. A new bill, HB 4517, would expand Michigan’s definition of marijuana to include THC, regardless of whether it is artificially or naturally derived. The new legislation would define all THC products as marijuana, making them subject to the same testing and regulations. Michigan legalized medical marijuana back in 2008, and recreational marijuana 10 years later in 2018. The new bill now heads to the state Senate. The post Michigan House Passes Bill to Close Loophole in Marijuana Legislation appeared first on Michigan Medical Marijuana. View the full article
  15. A Lansing man is suing five police officers, Ingham County and a confidential police informant for what he says was a mistaken identity arrest. The five officers — four from Michigan State Police and one from the Ingham County Sheriff’s Office — were working with a confidential informant who told them a man named Al Jessup could sell him heroin and cocaine, according to a police report. According to the lawsuit, the informant lied to police about the seller’s identity and police were “reckless” in relying on the information. Police bought drugs twice from a man they believed to be Jessup, using their informant as the buyer, according to the police report. However, Jessup was not the man selling the drugs either time, according to the lawsuit. In December 2018, the Michigan State Police forensics lab confirmed the drugs were cocaine and heroin. Prosecutors filed two charges of dealing and manufacturing a controlled substance against Jessup in February 2019. Jessup wasn’t arrested until May 27, 2019. Nine days later, prosecutors asked to dismiss the charges. Ingham County Chief Assistant Prosecutor Mike Cheltenham said prosecutors could not sustain the necessary burden of proof. He declined to elaborate further. “The warrant issued for Al Jessup’s arrest was not supported by probable cause,” according to the lawsuit. “Defendant Confidential Informant #28068 is responsible for Jessup’s illegal arrest by lying to police…(The MSP troopers) are responsible for the illegal arrest by not ensuring they had probable cause before seeking an arrest warrant.” The lawsuit says Ingham County is liable because its policies “either allowed for an unreliable CI to be employed or allowed for (the deputy) to work with an unreliable CI employed by Michigan State Police.” Police said they identified Jessup as the seller using his Michigan Secretary of State photo, and the informant identified Jessup both in person and with his state photo. He now has lost faith in the justice system and fears law enforcement, according to the lawsuit. This is not possible, according to the lawsuit, because Jessup was not the man who sold the informant the drugs. READ MORE HERE Need a Great Attorney for a DUI or Drugged Driving Charge? Call Komorn Law 248-357-2550 LEGAL ADVISORY – Rules, Regulations and laws may have changed after this information was posted. It is up to the reader to research and determine the current status of those items. It is always best to consult an attorney that has experience and is focused on the cannabis industry. One of the most well known law firms in the industry for over 25 years is Komorn Law Other Posts Michigan State Police and Ingham County ‘reckless’ to rely on informant in false drug arrest Federal ruling looms in legal challenge to Detroit’s recreational pot law Marijuana Use Tax – Michigan House Bill 4085 420 Canna-Expo 2021 Michigan introduces bills to regulate Delta-8 and other cannabinoids Tags 2019 2020 2021 Adult Recreational Use Adult Use Biden breathalyzer cannabis Caregivers coronavirus Corona Virus Covid 19 datamaster drugged driving DUI Education Event FDA Hemp israel LARA LARA-BMR Laws legalization Marijuana medical marijuana michigan Michigan Legislature Michigan News MMFLA MMMA MRA MSP News pandemic 2020 patient-caregiver Patients Recreational regulations Release smell taxes USA USA News world news The post Michigan State Police and Ingham County ‘reckless’ to rely on informant in false drug arrest appeared first on Michigan Medical Marijuana. View the full article
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