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  1. February 4th, 2019 OTSEGO COUNTY, MICHIGAN: A musician who was a finalist on “The Voice” has been sentenced to 1 year probation. Laith Al-Saadi plead no contest to one count of possession of a controlled substance. The charges came from a traffic stop in February 2017 when Al-Saadi was pulled over by Michigan State Police for an expired license plate. According to the trooper, there was a strong smell of marijuana coming from the vehicle. “I fully recognize that it was stupid, and I have attempted to use this to better my life in the best way possible,” said Laith Al-Saadi at sentencing. Honorable George J. Mertz of the 46th Circuit Court said he took multiple things into consideration during sentencing, including the fact that Al-Saadi is 41 years old and does not have a criminal record. “My point is that I don’t think that you are using these things recreationally, and that makes a difference to me in sentencing,” said Judge Mertz. “You do have a very successful career and from what I’ve read you’ve used that in ways to help the community which I think is important, and I think it’s important you continue to be able to do that.” Although the case has had an impact on Al-Saadi’s career, his attorney says they are satisfied with the sentencing. “This a situation where he [Al-Saadi] had a previous prescription for the narcotic that he was found with, and it had lapsed, as that sometimes happens,” said Attorney Michael Komorn. “Also, I think it’s important that the court recognized that he is under a doctor’s care, and most remarkable I think is that the court agreed with us that he does not have a controlled substance problem.” Charged with a DUI or Drugged Driving? Contact Komorn Law… 800-656-3557 While on probation Al-Saadi will be allowed to travel in and out of the state, as well as the country, if it is for work purposes. LAITH AL-SAADI His next performance in northern Michigan is a charity concert to support mental health will be held at the Traverse City Opera House on February 15th at 7:30 p.m. ‘Cure for the Winter Blues‘ Visit Laith Al-Saadi website For more information Finalist on “The Voice” sentenced to 1 year probation. Opioid Alternative Pilot Program in Illinois Michigan “The Voice” finalist Laith Al-Saadi sentenced on drug charge. Chronic pain drives patients to use medical marijuana study states The Michigan Supreme Court, Local Control and Medical Marijuana The post Finalist on “The Voice” sentenced to 1 year probation. appeared first on Komorn Law. View the full article
  2. The Opioid Alternative Pilot Program launched Jan. 31, with registration open through the Illinois Department of Public Health, or IDPH. The pilot program is part of the Alternative to Opioids Act, which former Gov. Bruce Rauner signed into law in August 2018, with the aim of combating the opioid epidemic. The pilot program will allow patients that receive or are qualified to receive opioid prescriptions access to medical marijuana as an alternative to prescription opioid medications such as OxyContin, Percocet and Vicodin. The pilot program comes amid a nationwide epidemic of fatal opioid-related drug overdoses. Of the 70,200 drug overdose deaths that occurred nationwide in 2017, opioids caused 47,600, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse. There were six times more opioid deaths that year than in 1999. Serious about getting a license to operate a Cannabis Business? PROTECT YOURSELF – DO IT THE LEGAL WAY FROM THE START Contact Komorn Law… 800-656-3557 Opioid-related overdose deaths in Illinois increased to 15.3 per 100,000 persons in 2016 from 3.9 per 100,000 persons in 1999. The Alternative to Opioids Act also lifted restrictions included in Illinois’ original medical marijuana law, the Compassionate Use of Medical Cannabis Pilot Program Act, which took effect January 2014. That law required providers to fingerprint and perform criminal background checks on all applicants. In fiscal year 2017, IDPH denied 635 qualifying patients, some solely on the basis of failed background checks. The Alternative to Opioids Act eliminated the fingerprint and background check requirements. “There is not a singular answer to the [opioid] crisis … it’s a piece of an answer,” state Rep. Kelly Cassidy, D-Chicago, chief co-sponsor of the bill. “But the minute we passed this bill, New York state introduced a version of it. We were the first in the country to contemplate short-term access as a way to prevent addiction.” Recent Posts Opioid Alternative Pilot Program in Illinois Michigan “The Voice” finalist Laith Al-Saadi sentenced on drug charge. Chronic pain drives patients to use medical marijuana study states The Michigan Supreme Court, Local Control and Medical Marijuana RECALL-Michigan faced with health risks from tainted medical marijuana “everyone’s journalist nowadays” The post Opioid Alternative Pilot Program in Illinois appeared first on Komorn Law. View the full article
  3. New study seeks to understand whether people are using cannabis for evidence-based reasons Date: February 4, 2019 Source: Michigan Medicine – University of Michigan Summary: A new study seeks to understand whether people are using medical cannabis for evidence-based reasons. Slowly but surely, the stigma surrounding marijuana use is losing its grip in the U.S. Since the 1990s, advocates have pushed for a re-evaluation of cannabis (the plant species name often used interchangeably with marijuana) as a viable treatment for a host of ailments. As of 2018, 33 states and the District of Columbia have approved the medical use of cannabis, while 10 states have legalized marijuana for recreational use. Despite this fact, at the federal level, marijuana remains a Schedule 1 drug under the Controlled Substances Act, defined as a drug with no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse. New research from the University of Michigan, published in the February issue of Health Affairs, takes a deeper dive into state medical marijuana registry data to provide more insight into its use. Hmm…what data? “We did this study because we wanted to understand the reasons why people are using cannabis medically, and whether those reasons for use are evidence based,” says lead author Kevin Boehnke, Ph.D., research investigator in the department of anesthesiology and the Chronic Pain and Fatigue Research Center. He and his U-M colleagues Daniel J. Clauw, M.D., a professor of anesthesiology, medicine, and psychiatry and Rebecca L. Haffajee, Ph.D., assistant professor of health management and policy, as well as U-M alum Saurav Gangopadhyay, M.P.H., a consultant at Deloitte, sought out data from states with legalized medical use of marijuana. To examine patterns of use, the researchers grouped patient-reported qualifying conditions (i.e. the illnesses/medical conditions that allowed a patient to obtain a license) into evidence categories pulled from a recent National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine report on cannabis and cannabinoids. The report, published in 2017, is a comprehensive review of 10,000 scientific abstracts on the health effects of medical and recreational cannabis use. According to the report, there was conclusive or substantial evidence that chronic pain, nausea and vomiting due to chemotherapy, and multiple sclerosis (MS) spasticity symptoms were improved as a result of cannabis treatment. Serious about getting a license to operate a Cannabis Business? PROTECT YOURSELF – DO IT THE LEGAL WAY FROM THE START Contact Komorn Law… 800-656-3557 Evidence-based relief One major finding of the Health Affairs paper was the variability of available data. Less than half of the states had data on patient-reported qualifying conditions and only 20 reported data on the number of registered patients. The authors also noted that the number of licensed medical users, with 641,176 registered medical cannabis patients in 2016 and 813,917 in 2017, was likely far lower than the actual number of users. However, with the available data, they found that the number of medical cannabis patients rose dramatically over time and that the vast majority — 85.5 percent — of medical cannabis license holders indicated that they were seeking treatment for an evidence-based condition, with chronic pain accounting for 62.2 percent of all patient-reported qualifying conditions. “This finding is consistent with the prevalence of chronic pain, which affects an estimated 100 million Americans,” the authors state. This research provides support for legitimate evidence-based use of cannabis that is at direct odds with its current drug schedule status, notes Boehnke. This is especially important as more people look for safer pain management alternatives in light of the current opioid epidemic. Notes Boehnke, “Since the majority of states in the U.S. have legalized medical cannabis, we should consider how best to adequately regulate cannabis and safely incorporate cannabis into medical practice.” BUT WAIT…WHAT’S THIS ??? A CONTRADICTION Major study finds ‘no evidence’ that cannabis relieves chronic pain Go Here and Read it. Medical News Today Recent Posts Chronic pain drives patients to use medical marijuana study states The Michigan Supreme Court, Local Control and Medical Marijuana RECALL-Michigan faced with health risks from tainted medical marijuana Oakland County gets its ‘first licensed marijuana dispensary’ The Weekend in News Feb 1, 2019 thru Feb 3, 2019 “everyone’s journalist nowadays” The post Chronic pain drives patients to use medical marijuana study states appeared first on Komorn Law. View the full article
  4. Reported in the The Detroit News Feb 4, 2019 The recalls of six batches of medical marijuana available on the state’s regulated market since January have prompted industry and health expert concerns about continuing to let caregivers grow and create pot products to meet a shortage in the licensed market. More than 50 pounds of medical marijuana product were recalled in January from provisioning centers in Detroit, Lansing, Jackson, Kalamazoo and Ypsilanti for issues such as chemical residue, E. coli, arsenic, cadmium and Salmonella. The majority of the 43 products failing the testing were caregiver grown, the state has said. Despite the recalls, the state Medical Marihuana Licensing Board approved a resolution in mid-January allowing licensed facilities to purchase medical marijuana from caregivers through March 31 in an effort to meet an industry shortage while newly licensed growers prepare their first harvests. The state’s testing of caregiver products sold at provisioning centers lasted two weeks, from early to mid-January. The potential for contaminated product to slip through the licensed system for lack of testing could pose a risk to patients, in particular those with compromised immune systems, said Jamie Alan, an assistant professor in Michigan State University’s Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology. “If it’s not tested, you don’t know what’s in it,” Alan said. “But the alternative is that they’re in pain. It’s probably a somewhat small risk, but you can’t guarantee that.” While licensed facilities want the state’s 350,000 patients to have access to medical marijuana, “we also want people to be able to know what they’re ingesting.” said Joe Neller of Green Peak Innovation in Dimondale, which grows marijuana. “There’s no way to know how contaminated that product that patients have been consuming has been.” Over the next two months, patients searching for medical marijuana from a licensed provisioning center can buy from a small supply of tested product or sign a release and purchase untested, caregiver-supplied marijuana, said David Harns, a spokesman for the state Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs. Patients also have the option of bringing their untested marijuana to a licensed safety compliance facility for testing, Harns said. “The products will not be required to have met state testing standards, so patients need to understand that fact and assume the potential risk that the products may present,” he said in a statement. The batches recalled in the past month largely consisted of marijuana flower, as well as other products such as marijuana concentrate, patches and tinctures. Marijuana flower can be used in a variety of ways; marijuana tinctures are consumed on their own or added to a food or beverage, while concentrate is usually inhaled as a vapor. ‘Selective enforcement’ As the grace period for untested product continues through March, licensed growers and processors will be required to continue testing their own product, giving caregivers and unlicensed sellers a market edge over licensed facilities. The resolution penalizes “certain licensed facilities by selective enforcement” and fails to provide patients access to safe medical marijuana, the Michigan Coalition of Independent Cannabis Testing Laboratories said in a statement. “Under this new ruling, Michigan’s most vulnerable patients are buying purported medical cannabis products that could legitimately harm them,” the group said in a statement. The coalition, made up of more than a dozen licensed testers, growers and processors, proposed the state instead test caregiver marijuana prior to sale and put restrictions on caregiver product based on failure rates for chemical residue, heavy metals and residual solvents. Because most users will be buying from regulated provisioning centers in the future, the Michigan Cannabis Industry Association is not overly concerned by the short-term use of untested product, said association spokesman Josh Hovey. Many caregivers had tested their product voluntarily prior to the state’s regulatory framework requiring as much for licensed facilities, Hovey noted. “This is especially true for those that were serving pediatric patients and patients with autoimmune deficiencies,” he said. While not ideal, the state’s decision to allow caregiver product to be used on the regulated market through March was the appropriate response to the shortage, said Jamie Lowell, a board member of MILegalize and representative for the medical marijuana group, Americans for Safe Access. “I agree that people should not be consuming things with contaminants in them, but just because a couple things showed up in this testing, you cannot label all caregiver product as being bad for consumers,” Lowell said. Caution urged amid recalls Medical marijuana batches in Lansing Jan. 11 tested above state limits for chemicals, such as the mite-killing insecticide Spiromesifin, Salmonella and E. coli. Some items tested at more than double the state limit for Spiromesifin, while others tested positive for Salmonella and E. coli, which the state has ruled should not be detected at all. Some kinds of E. coli can cause diarrhea, urinary tract infections, pneumonia and other illnesses, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A Salmonella infection can result in diarrhea, fever, abdominal cramps and, in severe cases, hospitalization and death, according to federal health officials. The state contaminant limits for the marijuana products seem reasonable, especially given the historical context of a marijuana-linked Salmonella outbreak in the Midwest in the 1980s, MSU’s Alan said. “With the chemical it’s hard to say,” Alan said, noting there’s little research of the impact of Spiromesifen on humans. “With the bacteria, certainly if you’re immuno-compromised or have any serious illnesses, they pose a significant concern.” The infection risk to the immuno-compromised — a population likely to consume medical marijuana product — is a real concern when it comes to the continued use of untested product, said Dr. Preeti Malani, the University of Michigan’s chief health officer and a professor of medicine in the division of infectious diseases. A 2017 nationwide poll of people between the ages of 50 and 80 found 6 percent of those polled used medical marijuana and 31 percent said marijuana definitely provided pain relief. The survey, called the National Poll on Healthy Aging and conducted by a UM team Malani directed, should be a wake-up call to physicians, especially those dealing with immuno-compromised populations like the elderly, she said. Read More here at the Detroit News Recent Posts RECALL-Michigan faced with health risks from tainted medical marijuana Oakland County gets its ‘first licensed marijuana dispensary’ The Weekend in News Feb 1, 2019 thru Feb 3, 2019 Judge makes an example of marijuana user who killed a motorcyclist PLANET GREEN TREES INTERNET RADIO – LIVE BROADCAST The post RECALL-Michigan faced with health risks from tainted medical marijuana appeared first on Komorn Law. View the full article
  5. Reported in the Detroit Free Press Feb 1, 2019 As Michigan enters the new world of legal recreational cannabis, some long-time holdouts in law enforcement are expected to stand down. Although 63 percent of Michigan voters approved medical marijuana in 2008, Bouchard has been a leader, along with former Michigan Attorney General Bill Schutte, in quashing efforts in the decade since then to allow sales outlets for medical marijuana. That’s a one of the reasons why dozens of the outlets called dispensaries sprung up along the south side of Eight Mile Road in Detroit in Wayne County. Now, it looks like even Bouchard must yield to the tide of legal cannabis after Michigan voters in November legalized the recreational use of marijuana. On Friday, a shop billed as Oakland County’s “first licensed dispensary” opened in Walled Lake. Angie Roullier has muscular dystrophy and she said that “cannabis really changed my life” after she weaned herself from three decades of prescription drugs. The opening comes a decade after Bouchard ordered undercover officers from OAKNET — the Oakland County Narcotics Enforcement Team — to gather evidence prior to a police raid of what then-Ferndale Mayor Craig Covey said was the county’s first dispensary, called Clinical Relief. That shop had opened with the Ferndale City Council’s enthusiastic approval. But the ill-fated venture never reopened after OAKNET officers arrested more than two dozen people at the site. In Walled Lake, the City Council has been equally enthused about the opening of the Greenhouse on Pontiac Trail. And the new outlet’s CEO, Jerry Millen, said he doesn’t expect trouble from Sheriff Bouchard or the county’s narcotics investigators, after he paid $66,000 for a state license and gained full approval to open under the state’s new law. Read More Here THE REAL QUESTION: IS OAKLAND COUNTY READY? Recent Posts Oakland County gets its ‘first licensed marijuana dispensary’ The Weekend in News Feb 1, 2019 thru Feb 3, 2019 Judge makes an example of marijuana user who killed a motorcyclist PLANET GREEN TREES INTERNET RADIO – LIVE BROADCAST Are parents being wrongly accused by Child Abuse Pediatricians The post Oakland County gets its ‘first licensed marijuana dispensary’ appeared first on Komorn Law. View the full article
  6. In handing out a harsh sentence to a driver who smoked marijuana before she collided with a motorcyclist and killed him, Judge Rosemarie Aquilina is making an example of her. The lesson: Don’t smoke weed and drive. Problem is, in Michigan, it’s unclear what that lesson means. Marijuana is now legal, but any amount in a driver’s system could be considered intoxication under the current law. The sentence given to Logan Brooke Turner, 21, of Dimondale, underscores what’s at stake. Aquilina handed her a minimum of nearly six years in prison for operating while intoxicated, causing the death of motorcyclist Blair Beck, 21. Turner admits smoking marijuana the day of the crash, but her attorney, Lucas Dillon, argued she had no signs of intoxication beyond a blood test. A jury wasn’t convinced and convicted her after a four-day trial. Dillon said Turner was prepared for a one- or two-year minimum sentence. Seventy months was stunning. “We were basically outraged and shocked by the sentence,” he said. “I think it’s completely out of line.” The judge’s sentence went beyond the five years sought by prosecutors — the same amount of time they argued that it would have taken Blair Beck to meet a girl and start a family, travel cross county with his dad on motorcycles or finish his education. Recreational marijuana was illegal at the time Turner caused Beck’s death but legal by the time a jury found her guilty. Dillon, who is not a marijuana advocate, said the case points to the need for Michigan to better define impairment, especially now that it’s legal. “People are going to be driving around all the time with weed in their system. That doesn’t mean that they’re high,” he said. As my colleague Kara Berg has reported, how laws against driving while high are enforced depends on who is doing the enforcement. She spoke with nine prosecutors for a December report and found almost as many answers. ”Michigan has a zero tolerance law for drivers with certain narcotics in their system, such as cocaine, marijuana and heroin. That hasn’t changed with the legalization of recreational marijuana. “Or maybe it has, depending on who you ask,” she wrote. Some prosecutors said evidence of intoxication, such as swerving while driving or failing a sobriety test, is needed in addition to evidence of tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, the active ingredient in marijuana. Others said THC alone was enough. Some clarity on marijuana intoxication may be in the offing. An Impaired Driving Safety Commission, appointed in 2016 by then-Gov. Rick Snyder, has been working to make recommendations to the governor and Legislature on legal marijuana intoxication levels. A report is due out in March. Michigan State University Professor Norbert Kaminski, director of the Institute for Integrative Toxicology, is a member of the task force. He said recommendations are being finalized. “Certainly, the commission is wanting an appropriate and fair way to judge whether people are impaired,” he said. In Turner’s case, she had 5 nanograms of THC, the same amount of marijuana that constitutes impairment in states that have a set limit, including Colorado, a state with a high threshold for impairment. So she may have been found guilty even under well-thought-out, reasonable standards, though Dillon said evidence was submitted that Turner smoked after the accident and before she was taken into police custody for testing. The sentence is tougher than some convictions for drunk driving that led to deaths. Dillon cited the sentence of Cleveland Browns wide receiver Donte’ Stallworth to 30 days in jail for killing a pedestrian while driving drunk in Florida in 2009 as a contrast to Turner’s 70-month sentence. That’s in another state, under another set of laws. More locally, a Mason man driving while intoxicated who hit and killed a pedestrian, was given a one-year sentence in 2016. Years ago, I heard a prison reform advocate describe how we should save our prison space for those people we are afraid of, not people we’re mad at. The reason? Prison is expensive, and we should use our resources wisely. That makes Aquilina’s lesson a pricey one. And nearly six years of prison seems much more like anger than fear. Related: Are you too high to drive? That’ll depend on where you get pulled over The post Judge makes an example of marijuana user who killed a motorcyclist appeared first on Komorn Law. View the full article
  7. (WXYZ) — They are called Child Abuse Pediatricians, and they say their mission is to protect children. However, local parents, attorneys and even some doctors say some of these specialists are tearing families apart. The Parker family says they were emotionally and financially devastated after a false accusation of child abuse. Their lawyer says she’s had to fight against the same Child Abuse Pediatrician who accused the Parkers about 20 times, and they want to warn other families. Allie and Jimmy Parker are grateful for every second with their children, Isabella and Dylan. Last April, Child Protective Services workers took both babies from the Westland couple because one pediatrician accused them of abusing 6-week-old Dylan. “I said why can’t we get a second opinion, why is this one physician’s opinion the end all be all to your decision to terminate our parental rights,” Allie said, adding that it was just how things go because the doctor was the expert. The Parkers are talking about Child Abuse Pediatrician Bethany Mohr from the University of Michigan’s C. S. Mott Children’s Hospital. They’re not the only family who says Dr. Mohr’s accusation of child abuse tore their family apart. “It’s been the hardest thing I’ve ever been through in my life,” said Josh Burns in 2015, after he was accused of abusing his daughter. “I went to what I was told was the best children’s hospital in the state of Michigan,” said a mother who talked to us on the condition of anonymity out of fear that allegations would be reinstated. “They turned it all around on me. Blamed me for every part of it.” Read more and watch the WXYZ news report here. IF YOU HAVE BEEN ACCUSED OF CHILD ABUSE DUE TO MEDICAL MARIJUANA USE OR OTHER REASONS – CALL KOMORN LAW (800-656-7557) OTHER STUFF ANYHOW...Here is some information from the Council of Pediatricians Subspecialties…Ironically using the acronym CoPS. SUB-SPECIALTY PEDIATRICS INVESTIGATOR NETWORK… Ironically using the acronym (SPIN). What does a Child Abuse Pediatrician do? Child Abuse Pediatricians are responsible for the diagnosis and treatment of children and adolescents who are suspected victims of any form of child maltreatment. This includes physical abuse, sexual abuse, factitious illness (medical child abuse), neglect, and psychological/emotional abuse. Child Abuse Pediatricians participate in multidisciplinary collaborative work within the medical, child welfare, law enforcement, and judicial arenas as well as with a variety of community efforts. Child Abuse Pediatricians are often called to provide expert testimony in the court systems. This field offers the opportunity for involvement and leadership roles in community, regional and national advocacy, and in prevention efforts and public policy. What are the career opportunities? Most Child Abuse Pediatricians practice in academic settings and are responsible for patient care, teaching and research within an academic health center. However, there are other Child Abuse Pediatricians who practice in solely clinical settings such child advocacy centers, community hospitals and clinics. What Board, if any, certifies Child Abuse Pediatrics? Child Abuse Pediatric Boards are administered by the American Board of Pediatrics. Certification in General Pediatrics and completion of Child Abuse Pediatrics fellowship training are required for eligibility to take the subspecialty board examination. What is the lifestyle of a Child Abuse Pediatrician? Personal time and family life are essential to all physicians. Most Child Abuse Pediatricians balance the workload and stress of complex medical care with fulfilling personal life. Patient care, court testimony, teaching, research and administrative responsibilities vary depending on the specific position. In most centers, that ability to teach and conduct research provides academic enrichment that leads to a rewarding and balanced career and lifestyle. What is the compensation of a Child Abuse Pediatrician? Compensation is comparable to other academic pediatric subspecialties, but will vary depending on the geographic region, institution and specific responsibilities. How do I become a Child Abuse Pediatrician? Child Abuse Pediatrics training includes three years of fellowship training in an accredited Child Abuse Pediatrics fellowship program. Fellowship training includes medical evaluations of children with manifestations of acute and chronic child maltreatment, as well as children with a broad range of other diagnoses. The trainee develops expertise in determining non-accidental trauma and other forms of maltreatment by developing excellent diagnostic expertise and knowledge of various disorders which may mimic child maltreatment. Training will include mandatory reporting laws, legal proceedings, child abuse and family violence prevention, teaching opportunities, and clinical research. Where do I find out about available programs? Information about Child Abuse Pediatrics training programs is available on The Ray Helfer Society and ACGME websites, as well as FREIDA and ERAS websites. Child Abuse Pediatrics participates in the National Residency Matching Program (NMPR) Pediatric Subspecialties Fall Match. Applications through ERAS occur in July and August, with interviews in September and October. The Match occurs in November, the fall before the Fellowship starts. Why should I choose to become a Child Abuse Pediatrician? Child Abuse Pediatrics is an exciting field with opportunities for a broad clinical experience that includes multidisciplinary team work with medical and non-medical providers, contributions to investigative and legal proceedings, teaching a wide variety of audiences, clinical research, as well as, child abuse prevention and advocacy work. As a new subspecialty of the American Board of Pediatrics, there is tremendous opportunity to shape the future of this field and contribute to the health, well-being and safety of children. Certifications Eligibility Criteria for Certification in Child Abuse Pediatrics The American Board of Pediatrics (ABP) has established a procedure for certification in child abuse pediatrics. In addition to the specific admission requirements listed below, General Eligibility Criteria for all ABP Subspecialties must be fulfilled to be eligible for certification. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS Physicians who enter training in child abuse pediatrics on or after January 1, 2013, are required to complete their training in a program accredited for training in child abuse pediatrics by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) in the United States or the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC). A subspecialty fellow entering child abuse pediatrics training before January 1, 2010, may apply for admission on the basis of completion of 2 years of subspecialty fellowship training in child abuse pediatrics in a program under the supervision of a director who is certified in child abuse pediatrics or, lacking such certification, possesses appropriate educational qualifications. Only those child abuse pediatrics training programs that are operated in association with general comprehensive pediatric residency programs accredited by the ACGME or by the RCPSC will be considered. The Subboard requires that the period of training be at least 22 months, excluding leave. A Verification of Competence Form(s) will be required from the director(s) of the fellow’s child abuse pediatrics program(s). Three years of full-time, broad-based fellowship training in child abuse pediatrics are required for fellows entering training on or after January 1, 2010. Absences from Training No continuous absence of more than 1 year will be permitted. Due to the potential for significant changes in medicine over time, the Credentials Committee must review requests for previous credit when a fellow has interrupted fellowship for more than 12 months. Absences/leaves in excess of 3 months during the 3 years of training, whether for vacation, parental leave, illness, and so forth, must be made up. If the program director believes that the candidate is well qualified and has met all requirements, the program director may submit a petition to the ABP requesting an exemption to the policy. Training time cannot be waived for convenience, such as for fellows who begin training off cycle. Part-time training may be completed over no more than 6 years. For a fellow who began child abuse pediatrics training on or after January 1, 2010, the following must be accomplished in order to become certified in the subspecialty: A Verification of Competence Form must be completed by the program director(s) verifying satisfactory completion of the required training, evaluating clinical competence including professionalism, and providing evidence of scholarly activity/research. The fellow must meet the criteria stated in the “Principles Regarding the Assessment of Scholarly Activity”. Scholarly activity will not be required for individuals who began training before January 1, 2010. The fellow must pass the subspecialty certifying examination. ABP ID #: 1001911 Mohr, Bethany Anne Ann Arbor, MI United States of America Certification AreaCertifiedCurrently Practicing in this Area of CertificationMeeting the Requirements of Maintenance of Certification in this area (Learn more)Child Abuse PediatricsCertificate# 122 Yes 2009 Yes (Learn more) Yes General PediatricsCertificate# 70689 Yes 2000 Yes (Learn more) Yes The post Are parents being wrongly accused by Child Abuse Pediatricians appeared first on Komorn Law. View the full article
  8. July 31, 2018 -A Detroit Judge dismissed felony charges against six people arrested in a raid of a Detroit medical marijuana grow facility. All charges against Curtis Williams, 36; Cotea Jeanne Walsh, 37; Jones, 53; Travis Davison, 27; Jabari Currie, 31; and James Frazier, 32, of Detroit, were dismissed following a raid in the city of Detroit on May 29, 2018. Charges included felony drug delivery and manufacturing charges, both carrying up to 15 years in prison. Prosecutors argued that the facility on the 4400 block of West Jefferson Avenue was not licensed to grow marijuana. (Photo: Detroit Police Department) The Detroit Police Department’s Gang Intelligence Unit executed a search warrant at the medical marijuana facility and seized 200 marijuana plants, about $1 million worth, authorities said. “Over 1,000” plants were found in the raid, according to the Wayne County prosecutor’s office. (Note: 1000 or 200 plants or whatever) Officers seized marijuana and held employees at gunpoint during the May 29 raid, according to Harrington and his partners in the Denver-based marijuana company Viola Brands. All cannabis at the site was taken, the business’ accounts were frozen and employees’ vehicles were seized, according to the company. A defense attorney in the case, Michael Komorn, said the facility was granted a temporary operation’s certification from the city, allowing up to 1,500 plants while the facility waited for the filing process to be approved by the city. Komorn said the Wayne County Prosecutor’s Office made the argument that the facility only was allowed to sell, and not grow, at the facility. “That’s absurd,” Komorn said. “It’s a semantic issue because I would say everyone would understand that if they’ve been given permission to sell it, of course a medical marijuana caregivers center includes growing and cultivating marijuana.” The grow op’s certificate of occupancy from the city stated the intent for a greenhouse at the site, and the operation holds a temporary Class C license under Michigan’s Medical Marihuana Facilities Licensing Act allowing up to 1,500 plants, said 36th District Court Judge Kenneth King. Judge Kenneth King of 36th District Court dismissed the case “in the interest of fairness.” “In the interest of fairness and in the spirit of always trying to do the right thing, this court is left with no other choice but to dismiss this matter,” the judge said. King said he stayed up until 3:30 a.m. reading briefs in the case and sorting out the web of acronyms tied to Michigan’s medical marijuana law and the “seed-to-sale” tracking and tax, regulation and licensing system for marijuana growers and dispensaries that took effect late last year. “That kind of leads me to the burning question: if you’re able to dispense but you can’t grow it, how are you supposed to get it? Where are you supposed to get it from?” “I don’t believe the police had any malintent. The police are doing their job,” King said. “I think the real blame lies on the documents that were submitted and someone didn’t pay close attention to what the defendants were asking for.” Komorn said King understood his argument, and said the judge responded: “That kind of leads me to the burning question: ‘If you’re able to dispense but you can’t grow it, how are you supposed to get it? Where are you supposed to get it from?’ ” The case had been set for a preliminary exam Tuesday. King said he expected his ruling to be appealed regardless of whether it favored the prosecution or defense. Here is a statement from the Wayne County Prosecutor’s Office: “I have confirmed that the court granted the defense motion to dismiss the case. However, I don’t have a written opinion. “It is my understanding that the court held that the defendants operated in good faith regarding all the provisions of the law that they knew about the class C license (1500 plants) for a grow operation. The duty was on the city of Detroit to inform them about what was required and they failed to do so.” All charges were dismissed Tuesday July 31, 2018. Also…Michigan voters will decide on a ballot question Nov. 6 that would legalize and tax recreational marijuana for users 21 and older. Medical marijuana was legalized in Michigan via a ballot proposal in 2008. Komorn Law has represented numerous clients through the legal chaos of starting up a business in the Michigan Medical Marihuana Industry. Contact Us For More Information. 800-656-3557 The post Detroit Judge Dismissed Felony Charges Against Medical Marijuana Grow Facility appeared first on Komorn Law. View the full article
  9. Cannabis Advocates Want To Remove Marijuana From Controlled Substances List A group of Michigan citizens and organizations is suing the Michigan Board of Pharmacy to eliminate marijuana from the Schedule I list of controlled substances. The state’s Public Health Code, which was enacted in 1978, treats marijuana like opioids and heroin, and that is “unconstitutional under Michigan law,” wrote Michael KOMORN, attorney for the residents and organizations in the complaint recently filed in the Court of Claims. “Even opium, a ‘hard narcotic’ and the root of the opioid epidemic, is a Schedule 5 drug when sold in small concentrations,” he said. “As there is no rational basis to classify marijuana with hard narcotics, it now must be classified below Schedule 5. As no such schedule exists, marijuana must be de-scheduled.” Komorn, president of the Michigan Medical Marijuana Association, also argued that by passing the Medical Marihuana Facilities Licensing Act (MMFLA), the “Legislature has by implication repealed . . . marijuana’s controlled substance status.” The MMFLA and Michigan Controlled Substances Act (MCSA), he noted, are “fundamentally inconsistent and incapable of being harmonized.” Interested in getting a license to operate a Cannabis Business. You need a full service law firm. Contact Komorn Law… 800-656-3557. Other plaintiffs include the Michigan Medical Marijuana Association, Dr. Christian Bogner, who researches the effects of cannabis to treat autism; Josey Scoggin, whose daughter is a medical marijuana patient; Paul Littler, a pharmacist; NORML of Michigan. The “absurdity” of the legal conflict between the Medical Marihuana Facilities Licensing Act and the Public Health Code has to be addressed, said Michael Komorn, one of the attorneys behind the case. “It’s intellectually dishonest,” Komorn said. For the past year, state officials have allowed caregivers to grow marijuana at home and bring it to provisioning centers to sell to patients — a practice that continues as there’s a shortage of licensed marijuana in the market. “This is not a controlled substance,” Komorn said. “The idea that someone would be growing an opioid … and bringing it to a pharmacy because they were running low on their meds is the scenario that would have to exist in order for marijuana to remain as a scheduled drug.” “Michigan’s Public Health Code was adopted in 1978, and mirrored much of the national rhetoric towards drugs”, Komorn said. John Sinclair has a long history of advocacy in Michigan; his 1967 arrest over two joints sparked the first Hash Bash in Ann Arbor. The Michigan Supreme Court in 1972 noted in the opinion that overturned Sinclair’s conviction that… “not only that there is no rational basis for classifying marijuana with the ‘hard narcotics’, but, also, that there is not even a rational basis for treating marijuana as a more dangerous drug than alcohol.” The post Cannabis Advocates Want To Remove Marijuana From Controlled Substances List appeared first on Komorn Law. View the full article
  10. Cannabis advocates are suing the State of Michigan to remove marijuana from the state’s list of controlled substances in its Public Health Code. Although the passing of the adult-use marijuana law in Michigan in 2018, medical marijuana laws and the addition of bureaucracy and state taxes on marijuana sales, the state’s Public Health Code still treats marijuana like heroin. “For 80 years they’ve been locking people up and taking their possessions and harassing and terrorizing us as citizens because we like to smoke weed,” said poet and activist John Sinclair “I want to be part of every effort to completely remove the police from our lives regarding to marijuana. They’ve got nothing at all to do with marijuana.” Sinclair is one of several plaintiffs on the lawsuit against the Michigan Board of Pharmacy and its chairwoman Nichole Cover, filed last week in the Michigan Court of Claims. Interested in getting a license to operate a Cannabis Business. You need a full service law firm. Contact Komorn Law… 800-656-3557. Other plaintiffs include the Michigan Medical Marijuana Association, Dr. Christian Bogner, who researches the effects of cannabis to treat autism; Josey Scoggin, whose daughter is a medical marijuana patient; Paul Littler, a pharmacist; NORML of Michigan. The “absurdity” of the legal conflict between the Medical Marihuana Facilities Licensing Act and the Public Health Code has to be addressed, said Michael Komorn, one of the attorneys behind the case. “It’s intellectually dishonest,” Komorn said. For the past year, state officials have allowed caregivers to grow marijuana at home and bring it to provisioning centers to sell to patients — a practice that continues as there’s a shortage of licensed marijuana in the market. “This is not a controlled substance,” Komorn said. “The idea that someone would be growing an opioid … and bringing it to a pharmacy because they were running low on their meds is the scenario that would have to exist in order for marijuana to remain as a scheduled drug.” “Michigan’s Public Health Code was adopted in 1978, and mirrored much of the national rhetoric towards drugs”, Komorn said. John Sinclair has a long history of advocacy in Michigan; his 1967 arrest over two joints sparked the first Hash Bash in Ann Arbor. The Michigan Supreme Court in 1972 noted in the opinion that overturned Sinclair’s conviction that… “not only that there is no rational basis for classifying marijuana with the ‘hard narcotics’, but, also, that there is not even a rational basis for treating marijuana as a more dangerous drug than alcohol.” The post Lawsuit Filed To Remove Cannabis From Michigan Controlled Substances List appeared first on Komorn Law. View the full article
  11. Watch some of the latest videos from Komorn Law and the internet about hemp and cannabis. Watch some of the latest videos from Komorn Law Interested in getting a license to operate a Cannabis Business. You need a full service law firm. Contact Komorn Law… 800-656-3557. The post Watch some of the latest videos from Komorn Law appeared first on Komorn Law. View the full article
  12. Watch some of the latest videos from Komorn Law and the internet about hemp and cannabis. Watch some of the latest videos from Komorn Law Interested in getting a license to operate a Cannabis Business. You need a full service law firm. Contact Komorn Law… 800-656-3557. The post Watch some of the latest videos from Komorn Law appeared first on Komorn Law. View the full article
  13. LARA – BMR Releases – Current 1/20/19 PUBLIC HEALTH AND SAFETY Public Health and Safety Advisory Indica LLC 1-18-19 Public Health and Safety Advisory HG Lansing 1-11-19 Public Health and Safety Advisory CCBD 1-10-19 Public Health and Safety Advisory TGMD 1-10-19 Public Health and Safety Advisory 1-4-19: Voluntary Recall BMR ADVISORY Updated Consent Form for the Sale or Transfer of Untested Marihuana Product Recent Changes to Marijuana Laws Notifications of Diversion, Theft, Loss, or Criminal Activity Medical Marijuana Facility Temporary Operation Set to End on December 31, 2018 Updated Universal Symbol THCA Crystals/Diamonds Caregiver and Patient Status Requirements for Certain Licensed Facilities Visiting Qualifying Patients: Out of State Registration New Maximum THC Concentrations For Marihuana-Infused Products Protecting Water Resources When Growing and Processing Marihuana Daily Purchasing Limits & Item Categories in METRC Clarification Regarding Chairman Johnson’s Statement at Today’s Medical Marihuana Licensing Board Meeting 30-Day Transition Period Regulatory Assessment FY 2019 Consent Form for the Sale or Transfer of Untested Marihuana Product September Emergency Rules Transition Edible Marihuana Products Bulletin Health and Safety Guidance for Medical Marihuana Facilities Processor Reminders Bulletin Facility Reporting Requirements Regarding Hazardous Materials Application Process Grower Gas Detection System and Fumigation Processor Gas Detection System Criminal History Disclosure Statement of Money Lender Form CPA Attestation License Stacking for Class C Growers Co-Location of Medical Marihuana Facilities Registered Caregivers/Patients Transition to Facility Licensee/Employee Local and State Fees License Application Process Municipal Authorization of Marihuana Facilities Continued Operation with Local Authorization Public Act update and Sample Collection Application Document Checklist Licensee Capitalization Requirements and Proof of Financial Responsibility Required Marihuana Product Testing Points TECHNICAL BULLETINS Safety Compliance Facility Information Retesting and Remediation – Technical Bulletin Department Banned Pesticide Active Ingredient List Clarification on the use of term “dispensary” for Provisioning Centers Safety Compliance Facility Inspection Guide Processor Inspection Guide Secure Transporter Inspection Guide Provisioning Center Inspection Guide Grower Inspection Guide Department Approved Pesticide List Update The post LARA – BMR Releases – Current 1/20/19 appeared first on Komorn Law. View the full article
  14. The Michigan Chapter of The National Hemp Industry Association will be meeting at their headquarters in Farmington Hills Michigan. Join Us for first meeting as we network to grow this chapter. There will be discussion, presentations, snacks and refreshments. Where: 30903 Northwestern Highway, Suite 240 When: Wednesday January 30, 2019 @ 6:00pm RSVP: 248-897-0465 (ask for Josh) LIMITED SEATING AVAILABLE The post appeared first on Komorn Law. View the full article
  15. Michigan has joined the list of several states where it’s legal for adults 21+ to use marijuana. Employers are facing new challenges to manage their workplace drug-free policies. Listen to the Michigan Radio Episode Interested in getting a license to operate a Cannabis Business. You need a full service law firm. Contact Komorn Law… 800-656-3557. The post What will recreational marijuana mean for employers drug policies? appeared first on Komorn Law. View the full article
  16. Posted 1/17/19. Michigan voters approved a proposal to legalize recreational marijuana in the state back in November 2018 with an option for municipalities to opt out of sales. Several Michigan communities have decided to opt out of legal marijuana sales. Municipalities have the choice to temporarily opt out of recreational marijuana sales. Interested in getting a license to operate a Cannabis Business. You need a full service law firm. Contact Komorn Law… 800-656-3557. City leaders have cited many reasons for deciding to opt out. Most of them say it’s a bad message for youth or something related to school safety. List of opt outs who have notified LARA: Posted January 17, 2019 Municipality County Cheshire Township Allegan Overisel Township Allegan Three Oaks Township Berrien Coldwater Township Branch Newberg Township Cass Volinia Township Cass Sault Ste Marie Chippewa Dallas Township Clinton Essex Township Clinton Greenbush Township Clinton Delta Township Eaton Ironwood Gogebic Hillsdale Hillsdale Ingham Township Ingham Williamston Ingham Portland Ionia Caspian Iron Nottawa Township Isabella Brady Township Kalamazoo Charleston Township Kalamazoo Portage Kalamazoo Prairie Ronde Township Kalamazoo Ada Township Kent Almont Township Lapeer Cleveland Township Leelanau Fairfield Township Lenawee Tecumseh Lenawee Brighton Charter Township Livingston Green Oak Charter Township Livingston Iosco Township Livingston Oceola Township Livingston Pentland Township Luce Armada, Village of Macomb Chesterfield Charter Township Macomb Harrison Charter Township Macomb Richmond Township Macomb Frenchtown Charter Township Monroe Monroe Monroe Ashland Township Newaygo Fremont Newaygo Milford, Village of Oakland Northville Oakland Grant Township Oceana Carrollton Township Saginaw Bridgehampton Township Sanilac Brown City Sanilac Carsonville, Village of Sanilac Elmer Township Sanilac Flynn Township Sanilac Lamotte Township Sanilac Maple Valley Township Sanilac Marlette Sanilac Melvin, Village of Sanilac Minden Township Sanilac Port Sanilac, Village of Sanilac Sandusky Sanilac Speaker Township Sanilac Washington Township Sanilac Watertown Township Sanilac Algonac St. Clair Burtchville Township St. Clair Casco Township St. Clair Columbus Township St. Clair Kenockee Township St. Clair Richmond St. Clair St. Clair, City of St. Clair St. Clair Township St. Clair Mottville Township St. Joseph Nottawa Township St. Joseph Sherman Township St. Joseph Sturgis Township St. Joseph Tuscola Township Tuscola Geneva Township Van Buren Allen Park Wayne Grosse Pointe Wayne Plymouth Wayne Riverview Wayne The post Michigan communities who have opted out of recreational marijuana sales appeared first on Komorn Law. View the full article
  17. Cannabidiol, or CBD oil, is no longer considered to be marijuana in Michigan under a new legal framework created by the 2018 U.S. Farm Bill and a state law that takes effect this March. Instead of categorizing “all things green and smelly” by default as marijuana, the federal government has defined that the cannabis sativa L. plant that has less than 0.3 percent THC by dry weight as hemp, said Michael Komorn, a lawyer and president of the Michigan Medical Marijuana Association. Yet state officials have not yet determined how it will be regulated. CBD oil is typically derived from hemp — though it can be derived from marijuana — and contains less than 0.3 percent THC, the active component in cannabis that makes someone high. CBD oil is rising in popularity for treatment of pain, anxiety and depression. “CBD and other cannabinoids extracted from the plant are not criminalized anymore but would be subject to FDA regulations,” Komorn said. Have a Law Firm represent your interests to get your state license to operate your Cannabis Business. Contact Komorn Law… 800-656-3557. In May 2018 officials at the Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs announced that they regarded CBD oil as marijuana — which sparked backlash from users, who didn’t like the idea of getting a medical marijuana card just to buy a product that contained relatively no THC. Read The Rest Of The Story Here The sounds of flipping and flopping can be heard in the halls The post Michigan officials deal with CBD oil regulation appeared first on Komorn Law. View the full article
  18. Medical Marijuana Patients Protected Under LARA Recommendation Regarding Temporary Operating Facilities January 15, 2019 – The Dept. of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs (LARA) will recommend tomorrow that the Medical Marihuana Licensing Board (MMLB) adopt a resolution which will help maintain patient access to medical marijuana. LARA’s recommendation will allow temporarily operating facilities to reopen without it being an impediment to future licensure and will also allow licensed facilities to source product from caregivers without it resulting in disciplinary action. “We have heard from Michiganders closely affected by the ongoing transition to licensed marijuana facilities,” said Gov. Gretchen Whitmer. “It is important that we ensure that patients have access to their medicine while the medical marijuana industry continues to develop.” “This recommendation will extend the temporary operation of facilities and allow licensed businesses to remain competitive during this transition period,” said LARA Director Orlene Hawks. LARA recommends that the MMLB adopt a resolution that makes it clear that disciplinary action will not be taken against an applicant in the following circumstances: Have a Law Firm represent your interests to get your state license to operate your Cannabis Business. Contact Komorn Law… 800-656-3557. Temporarily Operating Facilities (through March 31, 2019) The applicant’s proposed facility is within a municipality that had an authorizing ordinance in place by December 15, 2017. The applicant applied for a license no later than February 15, 2018. The applicant notifies the Department within one business day of becoming aware of any adverse reaction to a marijuana product sold or transferred. Licensed Provisioning Centers (through March 31, 2019) The Board will not take disciplinary action against a licensed provisioning center for purchasing marijuana products from either a registered primary caregiver or from a temporarily operating facility, as long as the licensee does all the following: Obtain signed patient consent prior to selling any marijuana products that have not been tested in full compliance with the law and administrative rules. Enter all inventory into the statewide monitoring system immediately upon receipt from a caregiver or from a temporarily operating facility. Verify and confirm – before any sale or transfer – with government issued photo identification and the statewide monitoring system that the customer holds a valid registry identification card. Enter all sales in the statewide monitoring system and determine sales will not exceed daily purchasing limits. Notify LARA within one business day of becoming aware of any adverse reaction to a marijuana product sold or transferred. Licensed Growers or Processors (through March 31, 2019) The Board will not take disciplinary action against a licensed grower or processor for purchasing marijuana products from either a registered primary caregiver or from a temporarily operating facility, as long as the licensee does all the following: Enter all marijuana products as inventory into the statewide monitoring system immediately upon receipt. Tag or package all inventory that has been identified in the statewide monitoring system. Only transfer marijuana products that have been tested in full compliance with the law and administrative rules. Notify LARA within one business day of becoming aware of any adverse reaction to a marijuana product sold or transferred. Updated Consent Form for the Sale or Transfer of Untested Marihuana Product The post LARA allows unlicensed dispensaries to reopen appeared first on Komorn Law. View the full article
  19. An article in Hemp Today stated Cannabis activist and hemp entrepreneur Hana Gabrielova was detained and fined $500 in Florida yesterday for being in possession of hemp-based shampoo and lotion. Gabrielova, a Czech citizen and CEO at Jihlava, Czech-based Hempoint s.r.o., was singled out and detained after a sniffer dog alerted authorities to her luggage upon arrival to Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport, she told HempToday. 3-hour detention U.S. Customs & Border Protection agents detained her for three hours, Gabrielova said. They issued the fine after they claimed analysis showed the presence of THC in lotion Gabrielova picked up in California and a Czech made shampoo she’d carried with her on a business trip to South America after flying from California. The officers did not indicate how much THC their test showed, only saying the analysis was “positive,” Gabrielova said. “I asked them many times to cite the law the fine was based on,” Gabrielova said. “They couldn’t do it. They just kept saying THC is an illegal substance to import. So I got fined for the illegal import of THC in shampoo and lotion.” Starting a Hemp or Cannabis Business? Contact Komorn Law Immediately to secure your place in the growing BILLION dollar industry… 800-656-3557. Getting off easy? In the end, agents told Gabrielova they were letting her off easy, as the maximum fine for such an offense is $5,000. “They made me out to be a criminal for using hemp shampoo. That’s insane,” she said. “They took the CBD-only cream which works for my excema, as well as the shampoo.” The post Hemp firm CEO detained in Florida for carrying lotion, shampoo appeared first on Komorn Law. View the full article
  20. Michigan regulators are recalling marijuana products sold at dispensaries in Detroit and Kalamazoo after failing lab tests for mold and bacteria. The products were sold at the Green Mile on Eight Mile Road in Detroit and Compassionate Care by Design in Kalamazoo. Additionally, regulators announced late Friday the recall of marijuana sold in Lansing because of chemical and bacterial contamination. The Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs (LARA) issued two safety and health advisories for the items sold between Dec. 18 and Jan. 3 at the Green Mile in Detroit and Dec. 12 and 29 at Compassionate Care by Design in Kalamazoo. Lost Your License Because You Are A Medical Marijuana Patient? Contact Komorn Law Immediately to secure your rights… 800-656-3557. Products recalled at the Detroit dispensary include Gelato, Superman OG, Mimosa, and Girl Scout Cookies. The Gelato and Girl Scout Cookies items failed the lab testing for yeast and mold, while Superman failed for chemical residue. Bile-tolerant gram-negative bacteria and coliforms were the cause for the recall of the Mimosa strain. Items recalled at the Kalamazoo dispensary include Critical Cali, GMO, Silver Haze, Girl Scout Cookies, Critical Kush, Blueberry, Skunk #1, Chunk D, Amnesia Lemon Kush, Purple Punch, and Special Kush. Read the rest of the story here The post Marijuana products sold in Detroit, Kalamazoo and Lansing recalled appeared first on Komorn Law. View the full article
  21. From the minute Michigan voters approved legal cannabis, communities around the state began to grapple with a pressing question: How can we shut it down? You might not think that’d be the first priority for elected officials in a state whose voters approved the sale and use of recreational marijuana last November by a solid 56-44 percent margin. Yet when it comes to marijuana, many folks are of two minds: Using or buying it shouldn’t be a crime, but … do you really want a weed shop on your street? Metro Detroit communities Allen Park, Pontiac, Livonia, Northville, Birmingham, Troy and Grosse Pointe City are among the more than 60 cities and townships around the state that voted to opt out of the marijuana business since recreational use was approved last year. It’s a pattern that mirrors the aftermath of a successful 2008 ballot proposal that legalized medical marijuana. Because Detroit was slow to promulgate its own regulations, some 250 medical marijuana dispensaries opened in the city. A 2015 survey by Detroit data firm Loveland found that medical marijuana dispensaries were clustered along the city’s suburban borders, and its major thoroughfares, presumably in proximity to a suburban market that wanted access to medical marijuana without housing the dispensaries themselves. Detroit struggled to get a handle on the proliferation of medical marijuana dispensaries within its limits. Detroit’s City Council approved an ordinance to license and regulate those businesses in 2017, but a voter referendum that year complicated the process with a lengthy court battle. Read the rest of the story here The post Communities opting out of recreational adult use of cannabis appeared first on Komorn Law. View the full article
  22. CBD oil regulated as hemp, not marijuana LANSING, Mich. Jan 11, 2019 – A new law will prevent cannabidiol — more commonly referred to as CBD oil — from being regulated under Michigan’s medical marijuana rules. The legislCBD – ENROLLED HOUSE BILL No. 6331 sponsored by state Rep. Steve Johnson, R-Wayland, was passed by late last year and signed into law on New Year’s Eve. It defines CBD oil as a derivative of hemp, not marijuana. That means people who use CBD oil to treat things like seizures, pain and depression won’t have to get a medical marijuana card. Read The Rest Of The Story Here The post CBD oil regulated as hemp, not marijuana appeared first on Komorn Law. View the full article
  23. Toronto man loses his driver’s license after a medical doctor said his daily cannabis use would affect his ability to safely operate a motor vehicle. A Toronto man lost his Ontario driver’s licence after admitting to a doctor he smokes marijuana on a daily basis. The man, age 53, provided part of his medical file and other information to Global News for examination but asked not to be publicly identified out of concern for his employment. Lost Your License Because You Are A Medical Marijuana Patient? Contact Komorn Law Immediately to secure your rights… 800-656-3557. Last October, the man was referred to Dr. Peter Phua, a medical doctor who works in a psychotherapy clinic. He was seeking help with anxiety and claustrophobia, an extreme fear of confined places. The man says he was honest and upfront about his lifetime use of marijuana, which by mid-month was legally obtainable in Canada. He said he has always been truthful with physicians. READ MORE: Police in Canada can now demand breath samples in bars, at home “He’s a doctor, I thought I could trust him. If you can’t trust your doctor who can you trust?” he said. Phua is listed as a family physician in the public record of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario. At the initial meeting, the man says he told Phua he sometimes smokes five small joints in a day, usually mixed on a 50-50 basis with tobacco. “I told him I don’t smoke and drive,” he said, explaining he owns his own business, has several employees, and is conscientious about his cannabis consumption. He suffers from Crohn’s Disease and has survived two forms of cancer. He says marijuana helps him relax. In the first meeting, the man said Phua warned him he could have his driver’s licence revoked over his marijuana use, but wouldn’t. At a second meeting with the doctor about a week later, he says Phua repeated his warning and the assurance he wouldn’t report him. READ MORE: Returning bottles to the Beer Store? Beware of possible breath test by police “Twice he threatened, twice he said he would not, and then he did,” the man said. A week after the second meeting, the man got a phone call from Phua, who announced he was contacting the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario to have his driver’s licence revoked. “It was unreal, it sucked the air out of me,” he told Global News. On Oct. 15, the man received a notice of suspension of driver’s licence from the ministry, announcing his driving privileges would be revoked as of Oct. 22. The letter cited “evidence of medical condition that would affect your ability to safely operate a motor vehicle” as the reason. “Stop driving. You must not drive while you are suspended,” the letter warned. WATCH: Lawyers warn of possible breath tests by police at bars, home By now, the man had contacted the College of Physicians and Surgeons to file a complaint against the doctor. The College is investigating whether Phua violated the man’s privacy and told the man “he will lie to MTO to get Mr. X’s driver’s licence suspended”, allegations which have not been established by the medical regulator. The College of Physicians and Surgeons did not reply to a call for comment, nor did Phua. The man also applied to appeal the decision by the MTO. He submitted medical evidence from a gastroenterologist who had treated him for several years. “To my knowledge, there is no drug dependent history of impairment,” the doctor wrote, in support of the man’s licence reinstatement. After submitting forms and medical advice, the man got good news. “I got my licence back in two weeks. They (ministry staff) said it was a miracle,” the man said. Medical professionals are obligated to inform the ministry about someone’s medical situation in certain circumstances. According to MTO regulations, the “goal of the medical reporting program is to protect the public from individuals who have a medical condition that may make it unsafe to drive.” The ministry’s rules changed on July 1, 2018. READ MORE: Civil rights advocates question Canada’s new impaired driving law — but feds say don’t worry Under section 203 of the Highway Traffic Act, there are now mandatory reporting requirements for high-risk medical conditions, vision conditions and functional impairments that make it dangerous for a person to drive. The rules now apply to physicians, optometrists and nurse practitioners. “Included in the mandatory high-risk conditions/impairments is uncontrolled substance use disorders. Physicians and nurse practitioners are required to report any patient who has a diagnosis of an uncontrolled substance use disorder, excluding caffeine and nicotine, and the person is non-compliant with treatment recommendations.” But the man whose licence was suspended for marijuana use said he was not given any treatment recommendations or diagnosis by Phua. According to the ministry, someone could also lose driving privileges for excessive consumption of alcohol, even if the patient does not drive while impaired. READ MORE: Cannabis perceived as less dangerous than liquor when it comes to driving: study “Each case is reviewed on an individual basis in the context of regulatory requirements and national medical standards,” said a ministry spokesperson. Relieved that his licence has been returned, the man told Global News he’s concerned for other people who consume marijuana responsibly, hold driver’s licences and expect to be able to speak frankly with their doctor about cannabis use. “It’s going to be a big problem. You want to trust a doctor. But if they suspend your licence, I don’t know.” The post Toronto man loses driver’s license for smoking marijuana appeared first on Komorn Law. View the full article
  24. The state Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs (LARA) announced medical marijuana sold at a shop in Lansing has been recalled because it’s contaminated with potentially deadly bacteria. Tests on four types of marijuana sold at HG Lansing came back positive for E. coli, Salmonella, coliform and chemical residue: Citrix 1A4050100000F3D000000009 (E. coli and Salmonella) Gelato 1A4050100000F3D000000010 (chemical residue) Green Crack 1A4050100000F3D000000008 (chemical residue and bile-tolerant gram-negative bacteria, E. coli, Salmonella and total coliforms) Oreoz 1A4050100000F3D000000023 (chemical residue and E. coli and Salmonella) HG Lansing, on Oakland Avenue, must notify customers who bought the recalled marijuana. It was sold between December 27 and December 30 of 2017. The state says customers should return it to the store for proper disposal. https://www.wilx.com/content/news/Recall-issued-for-contaminated-medical-marijuana-sold-in-Lansing-504231931.html The post Medical Marijuana Recall-Lansing appeared first on Komorn Law. View the full article
  25. Is Alex Berenson Just Trolling Us With His Anti-Marijuana Book From Rolling Stone A former ‘New York Times’ journalist wrote about a “hidden epidemic” cause by pot — but it seems he got the science wrong In the past week, there’s been a flurry of media coverage around a new book called Tell Your Children: The Truth About Marijuana, Mental Illness, and Violence. One of the main points is that legalization is a terrible idea, because legal pot is already causing more people to become schizophrenic and psychotic, and people who are schizophrenic and psychotic are more likely to commit violent crimes. Alex Berenson, the book’s author — a former journalist who spent the past decade or so writing mysteries and thriller novels — landed plum op-eds in The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal. He appeared on Fox and Friends and Tucker Carlson Tonight. And the pop-psych theorist Malcolm Gladwell wrote an entire New Yorker article repeating and promoting the book’s thesis. And yet, this theory is deeply flawed. After five years of extensive reporting on the cannabis industry, it seems pretty clear that weed itself isn’t that dangerous — sure, it can be abused like any drug, but it’s weed’s illegality, especially the illegality of the supply chain, that poses a far greater public safety threat. So hearing Berenson promote these distorted, dog-whistle conclusions, it left me with one question: is he trolling us? Does he genuinely believe that the full legalization of marijuana is going to cause a significant rise in murders, assaults and mental illness — or is he just assuming a contrarian position to scare people into buying his book? Read the Rest here at Rolling Stone The post Is Alex Berenson Just Trolling Us With His Anti-Marijuana Book appeared first on Komorn Law. View the full article
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