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FlowerPower99

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  1. Bye Bye - How does it feel you feckless you know what. Not Done Yet - Spread The Good Word MLive article A former Livingston County judge who spent nearly six months in jail last year following a judicial scandal has now been disbarred. The Michigan Attorney Discipline Board, in a Feb. 24 order, disbarred Theresa Brennan effective March 18. The order comes after she was suspending in December 2019 from practicing law. She had served as a judge for about 14 years before being removed from the bench in June 2019 by the Michigan Supreme Court. Brennan served as a 53rd District Court judge. Investigators with the Judicial Tenure Commission said Brennan lied about a relationship with a State Police trooper, the lead detective in a double-murder case over which she presided. She also was accused of “failing to immediately recuse herself from hearing her own divorce case, tampering with evidence in her own divorce case and lying under oath,” according to a state Supreme Court summary of her case. In January 2020, Brennan was ordered to serve six months in jail after pleading guilty to felony perjury. She also was placed on 18 months of probation and ordered to complete 200 hours of community service. In the Feb. 24 order, Brennan consented that disbarment was an “applicable” penalty because of the guilty plea and her earlier removal from the bench. She also was ordered to pay $825 in costs. If it were you or me we would get years and thousands of dollars More Oversight board disbars former Livingston County Judge Theresa Brennan (freep.com) Judge Brennan Michigan - Bing video search Related: Ousted Judge Theresa Brennan gets 6 months in jail on perjury charge Related: Ousted judge Theresa Brennan to be released from jail early Allegations of judge's affair could lead to murder case being overturned (wxyz.com) Boo Hoo..........
  2. New York secures $50B in funding from Biden’s $1.9T COVID relief package Despite receiving a sizeable portion of the rescue package, Disgraced Gov. Andrew Cuomo will be in Washington, D.C. on Friday to ask the Biden administration for more cash. Sen. Graham Defends COVID Bill’s $10M for Pakistani Gender Programs: ‘Life Is Pretty Tough’ for Girls There. · Institutes a $15 per hour minimum wage, which the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) contended would result in 1.4 million job losses. · Unemployment benefits would rise to $400 per week on top of regular payments. This would last for up to roughly a year and a half. The RSC contended that, under the plan, over half of Americans would get a raise for being unemployed, meaning that this might hurt employment. · Democrats blocked an amendment that would ensure that federal benefits from COBRA health insurance are not used for abortion services. · Stimulus checks could go to families in which a parent is an illegal alien. · Allows subsidies for COBRA premiums to go to illegal immigrants. · “Unconscionably” gives labor unions, including teachers unions that are fighting against school reopenings, access to Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) funding up to $10 million per union. · Allows funding to go to colleges that have partnerships with owned or controlled companies by communist China. Democrats rejected a Republican proposal to fix this. · Allows funding to go to colleges and universities that have partnerships with Confuscious Institutes. · Provides $1.5 billion to Amtrak, even though the transportation company is sitting on “roughly $1 billion of unspent aid.” · Provides a $350 billion bailout for state and local government despite limited declines in overall revenue in 2020. · Eliminates the income restriction that prevented wealthy Americans from qualifying for the Obamacare premium subsidies. · Expands eligibility for PPP funding for large nonprofits, labor unions, country clubs, and publicly-traded internet news organizations. Banks contended that this would crowd out small businesses’ access to PPP loans. · Provide $50 million in funding for Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) environmental justice grants, which the RSC believes is a “thinly-veiled kickback” to leftist environmental groups. · Extends PPP funding to violent criminals, including those who have been found guilty of assault on a police officer and consensual sexual crimes. · Grants $800 million in additional foreign food aid. The COVID bill hands out: $75 billion for medical supplies, testing, treatments, and vaccinations $19 billion for public health: state health departments and community health centers $7.2 billion for Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) $15 billion for economic injury disaster loans $26 billion to bars, live venues, and restaurants $15 billion airlines payroll support The bill also raises unemployment to $400 a week. This rewards 53% of Americans “for being unemployed” and can last for a year and a half. The CBO predicts the unemployment changes could “increase deficits by $246 billion.” Plus, people staying unemployed for almost 16 months “could increase the unemployment rate as well as decrease labor force participation.” Then there’s the $413 billion in relief checks. Democrats want to send “$1,400 per man, woman and dependent, that begins phasing out at $75,000 of individual income.” So that’s $825 billion. Where’s the rest of the $1 trillion? • Federal benefits used to pay for COBRA health insurance premiums are not used to provide abortion services. • Maintains ability for Planned Parenthood to receive PPP [Paycheck Protection Program] funds. Promotes Illegal Immigration • Stimulus checks could go to families where a parent is an illegal immigrant. • Allows subsidies paying for 85 percent of COBRA premiums to go to illegal immigrants. • Allows funding to go to colleges that have partnerships with companies that are owned or controlled by communist China. Democrats rejected an amendment to fix this. • Allows funding to go to colleges and universities that have partnerships with Confucius Institutes. The PPP mentioned above “provides loans to help businesses keep their workforce employed during the” COVID-19 pandemic. It also allows eligibility to some borrowers “for PPP loan forgiveness.” President Joe Biden promised to open schools within his first 100 days. The bill gives schools incentive to remain closed because the government will provide them with “$130 billion on top of the $110 billion already given to schools, even if they remain closed.” Labor unions, including teachers, now have access to “funding worth up to $10 million per union. The bill expands the PPP to cover “violent criminals, including those guilty of assault on a police officer and nonconsensual sexual crimes.” The new guidelines for PPP push aside the small businesses that need funding. It also includes large nonprofits, “country clubs, fraternities and sororities and publicly-traded internet news organizations.” • Provides $50 million in funding for EPA environmental justice grants, a thinly-veiled kickback to environmental groups. • Extends PPP funds to violent criminals, including those guilty of assault on a police officer and nonconsensual sexual crimes. • Expands Medicaid eligibility, for five years, to incarcerated individuals 30 days prior to their release. • Prioritizes funding based on identity politics while ignoring rural businesses and communities. • Gives billions in subsidies and loan forgiveness worth 120% of debt to farmers and ranchers on the basis of race and ethnicity. • Gives $800 million in additional foreign food aid. more useless items: Budget-busting Spending • Over $1 trillion remains unspent while Democrats push Biden’s $1.9 trillion budget-buster. • Provides an additional $1.5 billion to Amtrak, which is already sitting on roughly $1 billion of unspent aid. • Provides $30 Billion for transit grants, available through FY 2024, of which $26 billion (87%) would go to urban area transit entities. This almost three times the total annual outlays through the FTA. • $8 billion in operating expense, debt payments, and development projects aid to largely urban airports, available through FY 2024. • Provides a $350 billion bailout for state and local governments despite limited declines in overall revenue last year. Such funding effectively subsidizes unwarranted shutdowns that kills businesses and livelihoods. • $3 billion in aid to supplement payroll costs for certain U.S. aircraft manufacturers. • Democrats on the Education & Labor committee blocked an amendment that would have required agency Inspector Generals to audit and report on the use of COVID-19 funds. • Congress provided $150 billion to the Coronavirus Relief Fund for state and local governments to cover pandemic-related expenses. It is unclear how much of the funds have been spent so far and whether the funds used met the letter of the law. • Incentivizes harmful Medicaid expansion by increasing newly expanded state’s base FMAP by five percentage points for two years. Not only does this hurt state budgets, it also brings our nation one step closer to a complete federal takeover of our health care sector. • Increase the size of Obamacare premium tax credits for existing beneficiaries. • Effectively place an excise tax on everyday Americans’ pharmaceutical purchases by removing the Medicaid AMP rebate cap, which could create instances where drug manufacturers are paying Medicaid to supply drugs. • Expands Medicaid eligibility, for five years, to incarcerated individuals 30 days prior to their release and to women for 12 months postpartum, an unrelated provision that should be considered on its own merits. • Provides additional subsidies for LIHEAP ($4.5 billion), a program ripe with fraud, waste, and abuse, that President Trump even sought to eliminate. • Extends 15 percent increase in SNAP funding through the rest of FY 2021. • Provides nearly $600 million for additional paid leave for federal employees and postal workers. • Would increase the Child Tax Credit (CTC) by $1,000 per child over 5 and $1,600 per child under 6. For 2021, the credit would be fully refundable. Would double the maximum EITC benefit to workers with no dependents. • Would increase, by 20%, the maximum amount of federally subsidized wages for paid leave. Would allow self-employed people to claim up to 60 days annually worth of federally subsidized paid leave. • Removes state matching requirement for the Child Care Entitlement to States (CCES) grant program, along with an almost 20% increase in funding for this program. • Would, effectively, implement the Democratic Butch Lewis taxpayer bailout of pensions plan.
  3. I posted this in another thread but I feel this is an important victory that has been a battle for 13 years. Thank You Komorn Law - for the Court of Appeals win for Medical Marijuana patients on probation to use their medicine. Now here come the other attorneys to ruin the MRTMA law stating that it's wording is the same. I got $100 riding that some politician is being influenced right this second to modify the law to benefit no one but the state. There will probably be attempts to modify the MMMA Act too. The medical I assume will be phased out soon. I know your law firm has been fighting for the right's of patients and caregivers since the fight to get it passed began. I know several people you have helped secure their freedom and have recommended you guys several times. Keep up the good fight. There are those that are going to try to manipulate the MMMP and MRTMA laws for their own personal greed and fear of competition. I know you probably get caught in the middle. Press on but don't forget about the common person who always ends up getting ripped off. Here is the COA Opinion ---> COA Opinion
  4. Thank You Komorn Law - for the Court of Appeals win for Medical Marijuana patients on probation to use their medicine. Now here come the other attorneys to ruin the MRTMA law stating that it's wording is the same. I got $100 riding that some politician is being influenced right this second to modify the law to benefit no one but the state. There will probably be attempts to modify the MMMA Act too. The medical I assume will be phased out soon. I know your law firm has been fighting for the right's of patients and caregivers since the fight to get it passed began. I know several people you have helped secure their freedom and have recommended you guys several times. Keep up the good fight. There are those that are going to try to manipulate the MMMP and MRTMA laws for their own personal greed and fear of competition. I know you probably get caught in the middle. Press on but don't forget about the common person who always ends up getting ripped off.
  5. What is kratom? Image Photo by DEA Kratom is a tropical tree (Mitragyna speciosa) native to Southeast Asia, with leaves that contain compounds that can have psychotropic (mind-altering) effects. Kratom is not currently an illegal substance and has been easy to order on the internet. It is sometimes sold as a green powder in packets labeled "not for human consumption." It is also sometimes sold as an extract or gum. Kratom sometimes goes by the following names: Biak Ketum Kakuam Ithang Thom How do people use kratom? Most people take kratom as a pill, capsule, or extract. Some people chew kratom leaves or brew the dried or powdered leaves as a tea. Sometimes the leaves are smoked or eaten in food. How does kratom affect the brain? Kratom can cause effects similar to both opioids and stimulants. Two compounds in kratom leaves, mitragynine and 7-α-hydroxymitragynine, interact with opioid receptors in the brain, producing sedation, pleasure, and decreased pain, especially when users consume large amounts of the plant. Mitragynine also interacts with other receptor systems in the brain to produce stimulant effects. When kratom is taken in small amounts, users report increased energy, sociability, and alertness instead of sedation. However, kratom can also cause uncomfortable and sometimes dangerous side effects. What are the health effects of kratom? Reported health effects of kratom use include: nausea itching sweating dry mouth constipation increased urination loss of appetite seizures hallucinations Symptoms of psychosis have been reported in some users. Can a person overdose on kratom? There have been multiple reports of deaths in people who had ingested kratom, but most have involved other substances. A 2019 paper analyzing data from the National Poison Data System found that between 2011-2017 there were 11 deaths associated with kratom exposure. Nine of the 11 deaths reported in this study involved kratom plus other drugs and medicines, such as diphenhydramine (an antihistamine), alcohol, caffeine, benzodiazepines, fentanyl, and cocaine. Two deaths were reported following exposure from kratom alone with no other reported substances.* In 2017, the FDA identified at least 44 deaths related to kratom, with at least one case investigated as possible use of pure kratom. The FDA reports note that many of the kratom-associated deaths appeared to have resulted from adulterated products or taking kratom with other potent substances, including illicit drugs, opioids, benzodiazepines, alcohol, gabapentin, and over-the-counter medications, such as cough syrup. Also, there have been some reports of kratom packaged as dietary supplements or dietary ingredients that were laced with other compounds that caused deaths. People should check with their health care providers about the safety of mixing kratom with other medicines. *(Post et al, 2019. Clinical Toxicology). Is kratom addictive? Like other drugs with opioid-like effects, kratom might cause dependence, which means users will feel physical withdrawal symptoms when they stop taking the drug. Some users have reported becoming addicted to kratom. Withdrawal symptoms include: muscle aches insomnia irritability hostility aggression emotional changes runny nose jerky movements How is kratom addiction treated? There are no specific medical treatments for kratom addiction. Some people seeking treatment have found behavioral therapy to be helpful. Scientists need more research to determine how effective this treatment option is. Does kratom have value as a medicine? In recent years, some people have used kratom as an herbal alternative to medical treatment in attempts to control withdrawal symptoms and cravings caused by addiction to opioids or to other addictive substances such as alcohol. There is no scientific evidence that kratom is effective or safe for this purpose; further research is needed. Points to Remember Kratom is a tropical tree native to Southeast Asia, with leaves that can have psychotropic effects. Kratom is not currently illegal and has been easy to order on the internet. Most people take kratom as a pill or capsule. Some people chew kratom leaves or brew the dried or powdered leaves as a tea. Sometimes the leaves are smoked or eaten in food. Two compounds in kratom leaves, mitragynine and 7-α-hydroxymitragynine, interact with opioid receptors in the brain, producing sedation, pleasure, and decreased pain. Mitragynine can also interact with other receptor systems in the brain to produce stimulant effects. Reported health effects of kratom use include nausea, sweating, seizures, and psychotic symptoms. Commercial forms of kratom are sometimes laced with other compounds that have caused deaths. Some users have reported becoming addicted to kratom. Behavioral therapies and medications have not specifically been tested for treatment of kratom addiction.
  6. 2020 EXECUTIVE ORDERS Executive Order 2020-01 Executive Order 2020-04 (COVID-19) - Declaration of State of Emergency - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-05 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-06 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-07 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-08 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-09 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-10 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-11 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-12 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-13 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-14 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-15 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-16 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-17 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-18 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-19 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-20 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-21 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-22 (COVID-19) Executive Order 2020-23 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-24 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-25 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-26 (COVID-19) Executive Order 2020-27 (COVID-19) Executive Order 2020-28 (COVID-19) Executive Order 2020-29 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-30 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-31 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-32 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-33 (COVID-19) Executive Order 2020-34 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-35 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-36 (COVID-19) Executive Order 2020-37 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-38 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-39 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-40 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-41 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-42 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-43 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-44 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-45 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-46 (COVID-19) Executive Order 2020-47 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-48 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-49 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-50 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-51 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-52 (COVID-19) Executive Order 2020-53 (COVID-19) Executive Order 2020-54 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-55 (COVID-19) Executive Order 2020-56 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-57 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-58 (COVID-19) Executive Order 2020-59 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-60 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-61 (COVID-19) Executive Order 2020-62 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-63 (COVID-19) Executive Order 2020-64 (COVID-19) Executive Order 2020-65 (COVID-19) Executive Order 2020-66 (COVID-19) Executive Order 2020-67 (COVID-19) Executive Order 2020-68 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-69 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-70 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-71 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-72 (COVID-19) Executive Order 2020-73 (COVID-19) Executive Order 2020-74 (COVID-19) Executive Order 2020-75 (COVID-19) Executive Order 2020-76 (COVID-19) Executive Order 2020-77 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-78 (COVID-19) Executive Order 2020-79 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-80 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-81 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-82 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-83 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-84 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-85 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-86 (COVID-19) Executive Order 2020-87 (COVID-19) Executive Order 2020-88 (COVID-19) Executive Order 2020-89 (COVID-19) Executive Order 2020-90 (COVID-19) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-91 (COVID-19) (May 18, 2020) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-92 (COVID-19) (May 18, 2020) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-93 (COVID-19) (May 20, 2020) Executive Order 2020-94 (May 19, 2020) - Declaration of State of Emergency Executive Order 2020-95 (COVID-19) (May 21, 2020) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-96 (COVID-19) (May 21, 2020) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-97 (COVID-19) (May 21, 2020) - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-98 (May 22, 2020) - Declaration of State of Emergency Executive Order 2020-99 (COVID-19) (May 22, 2020) - Declaration of State of Emergency - Rescinded Executive Order 2020-100 (COVID-19) (May 22, 2020) Executive Order 2020-101 (COVID-19) (May 22, 2020) Executive Order 2020-102 (COVID-19) (May 22, 2020) Executive Order 2020-103 (COVID-19) (May 22, 2020) Executive Order 2020-104 (COVID-19) (May 26, 2020) Executive Order 2020-105 (May 26, 2020) - Declaration of State of Emergency Executive Order 2020-106 (COVID-19) (May 28, 2020) Executive Order 2020-107 (May 29, 2020) Executive Order 2020-108 (May 29, 2020) Executive Order 2020-109 (May 29, 2020) Executive Order 2020-110 (COVID-19) (June 1, 2020) Executive Order 2020-111 (COVID-19) (June 1, 2020) Executive Order 2020-112 (COVID-19) (June 3, 2020) Executive Order 2020-113 (COVID-19) (June 4, 2020) Executive Order 2020-114 (COVID-19) (June 5, 2020) Executive Order 2020-115 (COVID-19) (June 5, 2020) Executive Order 2020-116 (COVID-19) (June 5, 2020) Executive Order 2020-117 (COVID-19) (June 9, 2020) Executive Order 2020-118 (COVID-19) (June 11, 2020) Executive Order 2020-119 (COVID-19) (June 11, 2020) Executive Order 2020-120 (COVID-19) (June 12, 2020) Executive Order 2020-121 (June 12, 2020) Executive Order 2020-122 (COVID-19) (June 12, 2020) Executive Order 2020-123 (COVID-19) (June 15, 2020) Executive Order 2020-124 (COVID-19) (June 16, 2020) Executive Order 2020-125 (COVID-19) (June 17, 2020) Executive Order 2020-126 (COVID-19) (June 17, 2020) Executive Order 2020-127 (COVID-19) (June 18, 2020) - Declaration of State of Emergency Executive Order 2020-128 (COVID-19) (June 18, 2020) Executive Order 2020-129 (COVID-19) (June 18, 2020) Executive Order 2020-130 (June 19, 2020) Executive Order 2020-131 (COVID-19) (June 24, 2020) Executive Order 2020-132 (COVID-19) (June 25, 2020) Executive Order 2020-133 (COVID-19) (June 25, 2020) Executive Order 2020-134 (COVID-19) (June 26, 2020) Executive Order 2020-135 (COVID-19) (June 26, 2020) Executive Order 2020-136 (COVID-19) (June 26, 2020) Executive Order 2020-137 (COVID-19) (June 29, 2020) Executive Order 2020-138 (COVID-19) (June 29, 2019) Executive Order 2020-139 (June 30, 2020) Executive Order 2020-140 (COVID-19) (June 30, 2020) Executive Order 2020-141 (COVID-19) (June 30, 2020) Executive Order 2020-142 (COVID-19) (June 30, 2020) Executive Order 2020-143 (COVID-19) (July 1, 2020) https://www.michigan.gov/whitmer/0,9309,7-387-90499_90705---,00.html
  7. Play for power and domination will be the topic for the next 2 years. Green Peak has lobbied to eliminate caregivers and make giving away recreational illegal. Eventually people are going to end back up in Jail and Joints will be sold at gas stations like cigarettes unless we stay on top of what Michigan voted for. https://michiganmedicalmarijuana.com/state-pension-fund-is-indirectly-funding-michigans-largest-pot-operations/
  8. Enter info into the database and if someone in the same general area as you signs up we will notify you. https://michiganmedicalmarijuana.com/patient-caregiver-connect/
  9. News Report VOTE NOW: Should medical marijuana caregivers be required to have their products tested by the state? https://www.wxyz.com/news/vote-now-should-medical-marijuana-caregivers-be-required-to-have-their-products-tested-by-the-state
  10. The new struggle for marijuana continues to keep it free from the money grubbing corporate vultures. OPINION...Here come the money hungry corporations looking to steal away what a grassroots movement fought so hard for...for decades. So many soldiers and victims of the war - for marijuana legalization, for using as medicine or for using recreational marijuana They have had their lives and families ruined by criminal records and many of them who are still sitting in prison. Some did not live to see the day. Of course there are good and bad characters in everything - but the more good the less bad. These corporate vultures will be spending hundreds of thousands of dollars in marketing in newspapers, billboards, social media and more to brainwash you. Wasted money. One such vulture is Jeff Radway, CEO of Green Peak Innovations and his PAID employees who had a rally calling on Governor Gretchen Whitmer and officials to enforce the state’s marijuana laws and end the sale of untested caregiver marijuana to dispensaries. One would wonder if those employees had a choice to be there or not? 13 Million Dollars, 100 employees or so, One Talking Head vs 300,000 patients and caregivers - Hmmm Some will get it. Some get that we need clean medical marijuana. But DO NOT ever try to take a patient's right to choose or caregiver's right to grow or the right to grow and gift. That is what was voted for ! Not fo some corporate snake to come in and pull the rug out from under us and steal what so many have paid a high price for. After reading some opinions in parenthesis - go to the website and read more Here are some excerpts from an article from Mlive regarding a rally on Wednesday at the capitol building. "Enough is enough," said Jeff Radway, CEO of Green Peak Innovations, over boos and jeers from caregivers and patients protesting nearby. Michigan's medical marijuana market is at a crossroads as regulators try to shift control away from caregivers and over to licensed businesses. ( Is that what the Michigan voters - voted for? Were caregivers part of the act...see here MMMA.) As more than 100 employees of Green Peak and licensed grower High Life Farms gathered outside the Capitol Wednesday, they were confronted by about 20 protesters wearing shirts holding signs featuring Radway’s corporate photo alongside targeted messages including “greedy pig” and “Jeff Radway hates children & the elderly.” (Jeff may not hate children and the elderly but may love money more?) Green Peak has invested $13 million to launch its medical marijuana grow operation near Lansing in January, but is still competing with untested marijuana grown by caregivers. (LOL ---> See Michigan and Federal Control Substance List - Sounds like a long list of federal CCE, Conspiracy, Drug and more crimes are being committed. Know anyone in prison for less? Thank to the voters and your money you are protected) Green Peak has launched a full assault on the issue this week, buying full page ads in the Detroit Free Press, Detroit News and Lansing State Journal; buying eight billboards around Lansing; starting a website, micleancannabis.org, and launching a change.org petition. “We believe medical marijuana should be clean and safe for the patients of Michigan. Beyond what we believe, we voted for it. This is the will of the people," Radway said. “We are calling on the governor, the legislature, the regulators and Judge Borrello: do the right thing and enforce the laws of the state of Michigan." ( Is that what (we) the Michigan voters - voted for and were caregivers part of the act...see the entire act here MMMA.) State Reps. Jim Lilly, R-Park Township, and Jason Sheppard, R-Temperance, spoke at the rally in support of the regulated market, and of a bill the House recently supported to set a compliance deadline of June 1. (Bad Choice - Everyone makes a few) “It’s important for patients to get this. It’s also important for us as a state to have something that can be followed, that’s a law, so that people are getting consistent care," Sheppard said. “It’s so important for us to continue the path forward; to allow this industry to grow and to make sure we’re being leaders in the nation on how we handle this.” Patients and caregivers are critical of licensed growers, and claim that they aren’t manufacturing CBD and THC tinctures and oils that patients need. Radway said data analytics indicate those products represent 1.5 percent of the market. “We have started with flower, we have started with distillate; we’re launching edibles next month, we’re launching vape carts -- we’re starting with the medicines the patients need most,” Radway said.... Some of the protesters Wednesday included witnesses who appeared in court last week to testify for a provisioning center, the Curing Corner, in their suit against the state. Among them was Jerry Millen, owner of the Greenhouse provisioning center in Walled Lake. “This is a bogus rally; these are all paid employees. This is a phony complaint by them (Green Peak) because they’re not making money," Millen said. “The state’s top grower is the only one coming forward -- that says it all.” CLICK IT --> GO TO MLIVE NOW AND SEE THE VIDEO AND THE COMPLETE ARTICLE . -- Amy Biolchini is the marijuana beat reporter for MLive. Contact her with questions, tips or comments at abiolch1@mlive.com. Read more from MLive about medical marijuana.
  11. State Industrial Hemp Statutes State legislatures have taken action to promote industrial hemp as an agricultural commodity in recent years. A wide range of products, including fibers, textiles, paper, construction and insulation materials, cosmetic products, animal feed, food, and beverages all may use hemp. The plant is estimated to be used in more than 25,000 products spanning nine markets: agriculture, textiles, recycling, automotive, furniture, food/nutrition/beverages, paper, construction materials and personal care. While hemp and marijuana products both come from the cannabis plant, hemp is typically distinguished by its use, physical appearance and lower concentration of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Hemp producers often grow the plant for the one or more parts — seeds, flowers and stalk. The plant is cultivated to grow taller, denser and with a single stalk. Federal Action President Obama signed the Agricultural Act of 2014, or the 2014 Farm Bill, which included Section 7606 allowing for universities and state departments of agriculture to begin cultivating industrial hemp for limited purposes. Specifically, the law allows universities and state departments of agriculture to grow or cultivate industrial hemp if: “(1) the industrial hemp is grown or cultivated for purposes of research conducted under an agricultural pilot program or other agricultural or academic research; and (2) the growing or cultivating of industrial hemp is allowed under the laws of the state in which such institution of higher education or state department of agriculture is located and such research occurs.” The law also requires that the grow sites be certified by—and registered with—their state. A bipartisan group of U.S. senators introduced the Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2015 that would allow American farmers to produce and cultivate industrial hemp. The bill would remove hemp from the controlled substances list as long as it contained no more than 0.3 percent THC. The U.S. Department of Agriculture, in consultation with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, released a Statement of Principles on Industrial Hemp in the Federal Register on Aug 12, 2016, on the applicable activities related to hemp in the 2014 Farm Bill. State Action At least 35 states passed legislation related to industrial hemp. State policymakers have taken action to address various policy issues — the definition of hemp, licensure of growers, regulation and certification of seeds, state-wide commissions and legal protection of growers. Some states establishing these programs require a change in federal laws or a waiver from the DEA prior to implementation. 2017 Legislation Update 38 states and Puerto Rico considered legislation related to industrial hemp in 2017. These bills ranged from clarifying existing laws to establishing new licensing requirements and programs. At least 15 states enacted legislation in 2017 — Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, Hawaii, North Dakota, Nevada, New York, Oregon, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming. Florida, Wisconsin and Nevada authorized new research or pilot programs. The governors of Arizona and New Mexico vetoed legislation, which would have established new research programs. State Laws Related to Industrial Hemp Defining Hemp State statutes, with the exception of West Virginia, define industrial hemp as a variety of cannabis with a THC concentration of not more than 0.3 percent. West Virginia defines hemp as cannabis with a THC concentration of less than 1 percent. Many state definitions for industrial hemp specify that THC concentration is on a dry weight basis and can be measured from any part of the plant. Some states also require the plant to be possessed by a licensed grower for it to be considered under the definition of industrial hemp. Research and Pilot Programs States have passed laws creating or allowing for the establishment of industrial hemp research or pilot programs. State agencies and institutions of higher education administer these programs in order to study the cultivation, processing, and economics of industrial hemp. Pilot programs may be limited to a certain period of time and may require periodic reporting from participants and state agencies. Some states establish specific regulatory agencies or committees, rules, and goals to oversee the research programs. States may also require coordination between specific colleges or universities and the programs, in other states coordination is optional. From 2015 to 2016, seven states enacted legislation to create hemp research or pilot programs, including Pennsylvania (H.B. 976) and Hawaii (S.B. 2659). While industrial hemp research and pilot programs typically focus on studying the cultivation, processing for certain products and economic impacts of hemp, some states have specific guidelines and intended goals. Here are some examples of unique state research goals: · Colorado S.B. 184 (2014) created an Industrial Hemp Grant Research Program for state universities to research and develop hemp strains that are best suited for industrial applications and develop new seed strains. · Colorado S.B. 109 (2017) directed the commissioner of agriculture to create a group to study the feasibility hemp products' use in animal feed. · Kentucky’s industrial hemp research program studies the environmental benefit or impact of hemp, the potential use of hemp as an energy source or biofuel, and the agronomy research being conducted worldwide relating to hemp. · The North Carolina Hemp Commission studies the best practices for soil conservation and restoration in collaboration with two state universities. Licensing, Registration and Permitting To comply with state regulations for commercial and research programs, growers must be licensed, registered or permitted with the state agency overseeing the program. Requirements for registration, licenses and permits might include: · Criminal background checks. · Periodic renewals, usually every one to three years. · Registering the location or Global Positioning System (GPS) coordinates of grow sites. · Record keeping and reporting any sales or distributions including to whom it was sold or distributed, including processors. · Documentation from the state agency or institution of higher education to prove the grower is participating in an approved program. The state agencies overseeing these programs are typically authorized to conduct inspections, test the plants and review records. State agencies may revoke licenses and impose civil and criminal penalties against growers who violate regulations. Seed Certification and Access Access to viable seed may present a challenge for research programs and commercial growers. To implement commercial and research hemp programs, farmers need access to seeds that are guaranteed to produce plants that fall under the legal definition of hemp. These seeds can be difficult to obtain, however, because hemp is still regulated under the federal Controlled Substances Act. In response to this problem, Colorado’s governor sent a letter to the U.S. secretary of agriculture in 2014 requesting the federal government address hemp seed regulations. States are taking independent action to regulate industrial hemp seeds. Certified seeds are usually defined as seeds that contain less than 0.3 percent THC or produce hemp plants that contain less than 0.3 percent THC. At least four states have also established specific licenses or certification programs for hemp seed distributors and producers: · California requires seed breeders to register with their local county agricultural commissioner. · Indiana allows growers who obtain an agricultural hemp seed production license to produce seeds. Licensees may then sell seeds or retain them to propagate future crops. · Maine allows the commissioner of agriculture, conservation and forestry to issue licenses to seed distributors if their seeds are from a certified seed source. · Oregon requires growers who produce hemp seeds capable of germination to register with the Oregon Department of Agriculture if they intend to sell seeds. Growers who wish to retain seeds do not need to register as a seed producer. Criminal Justice and Legalization State legislation also has removed hemp from the state’s controlled substances list and exempted industrial hemp from the statutory definition of marijuana if it is grown within specific regulations. To protect growers from criminal prosecution some states provide an affirmative defense for cannabis possession and cultivation charges under controlled substances law for licensed individuals. States may require licensees to obtain a controlled substances registration from the DEA for the affirmative defense to apply. For a summary of state laws related to industrial hemp, click on the states in the map below or see the chart for a complete list of state statutes. Note that some states laws establishing commercial industrial hemp programs require a change in federal law or waivers from the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency before those programs can be implemented by the state. State Citation Summary Alabama Ala. Code § 2-8-380 to 2-8-383 and § 20-2-2 (2016) · Creates an industrial hemp research program overseen by the Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries to study hemp. · The department may coordinate the study with institutions of higher education. Alaska Alaska Stat. § 03.05.010; Alaska Stat. § 03.05.100; Alaska Stat. § 03.05.076 to 03.05.079; Alaska Stat. § 11.71.900; Alaska Stat. § 17.20.020; Alaska Stat. §17.38.900 (2018) · Directs the commissioner of natural resources to adopt regulations related to industrial hemp including approved sources or varieties of seed, testing requirements, and establishing isolation distances. · Specifies registration requirements and allowable activities for registered producers of industrial hemp. · Directs the department to establish fee levels to cover regulatory costs and annually review these fee levels. · Allows for the creation of a pilot program by an institution of higher education or the Department of Natural Resources. · Defines both industrial hemp and cannabidiol oil. Amends definitions for hashish oil and marijuana. · Clarifies that the addition of industrial hemp to food does not create an adulterated food product. · Requires a report on or before Dec. 1, 2024. Arkansas Ark. Stat. Ann. § 2-15-401 et seq. (2017) · Creates the Arkansas Industrial Hemp Program including a 10-year research program. · Authorizes the State Plant Board to adopt rules to administer the research program and license growers. · Requires the State Plant Board to provide an annual report starting Dec. 31, 2018. · Allows the University of Arkansas’s Division of Agriculture and the Arkansas Economic Development Commission to work with the State Plant Board. · Establishes a separate program fund, which will include feeds collected and other sources of funding California Cal. Food and Agric. Code §81000 to 81010 (2016) · Allows for a commercial hemp program overseen by the Industrial Hemp Advisory Board within the California Department of Food and Agriculture. · Establishes registration for seed breeders. · This division will not become operative unless authorized under federal law. Colorado Colo. Rev. Stat. § 35-61-101 to 35-61-109 (2016) · Allows hemp cultivation for commercial and research purposes to be overseen by the Industrial Hemp Committee under the Department of Agriculture. · Establishes a seed certification program. · Establishes a grant program for state institutions of higher education to research new hemp seed varieties. Connecticut 2014 Conn. Acts, P.A. #14-191 (Reg. Sess.) · Created an industrial hemp feasibility study which reported to the state legislature on Jan. 1, 2015. Delaware Del. Code Ann. tit. 3 § 2800 to 2802 (2016) · Establishes an industrial hemp research program overseen by the Delaware Department of Agriculture. · Allows the department to certify institutions of higher education to cultivate hemp for research purposes. Florida S 1726 (Enacted; Effective June 16, 2017) · Directs the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services to authorize and oversee the development of industrial hemp pilot projects at certain universities. Commercialization projects may be allowed after two years with certain conditions. · Authorizes the universities to develop pilot projects in partnership with public, nonprofit, and private entities; · Requires a university to submit a report within two years of establishing a pilot program. Hawaii Hawaii Rev. Stat. § 141A to 141J and § 712 (2016) · Establishes an industrial hemp pilot program overseen by the Hawaii Department of Agriculture. · Allows the Board of Agriculture to certify hemp seeds. Illinois Ill. Ann. Stat. ch. 720 § 550/15.2 (2016) · Creates an industrial hemp pilot program which allows the Illinois Department of Agriculture or state institutions of higher education to grow hemp for research purposes. · Requires institutions of higher education provide annual reports to the department. Indiana Ind. Code Ann. § 15-15-13-1 to 15-15-13-17 (2016) · Allows the production and possession of hemp by licensed growers for commercial and research purposes. · Growers and handlers of hemp seeds must obtain a hemp seed production license. · Nothing in this section allows anyone to violate federal law. Kentucky Ky. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 260.850 to 260.869 (2016) · Creates an industrial hemp research program and a commercial licensing program to allow hemp cultivation for any legal purpose. · The commercial growers’ license shall only be allowed subject to the legalization of hemp under federal law. · Growers are required to use certified seeds and may import or resell certified seeds. · Mandates the University of Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station oversee a five year hemp research program. · Creates the Industrial Hemp Commission, attached to the Agricultural Experiment Station, to oversee, among other things, the licensing, testing and implementation of regulations and rules related to hemp. Maine Me. Rev. Stat. Ann. tit. 7 § 2231 (2016) · Allows hemp growing for commercial purposes. · Establishes a license for seed distributors. Maryland Md. Agriculture Code Ann. § 14-101 (2016) · Establishes a license allowing individuals to plant, grow, harvest, possess, process, sell, or buy industrial hemp in Maryland. · Authorizes the Maryland Department of Agriculture or an institution of higher education to grow hemp for research purposes. Michigan Mich. Comp. Laws § 286.841 to 286.844 (2016) · Creates an industrial hemp research program allowing the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development and institutions of higher education to grow hemp for research purposes. Massachusetts Mass. Gen. Laws. Ann. 128 § 116 to 123 (2017) · Allows for hemp to be planted, grown, harvested, possessed, bought or sold for research or commercial purposes under the regulation of the Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources (MDAR). · Requires producers and distributors to obtain a license issued by MDAR and for persons utilizing hemp for commercial or research purposes to register with MDAR. · Directs MDAR and Commissioner of Agriculture to promulgate rules and regulations. Minnesota Minn. Stat. § 18K.01 to 18K.09 (2016) · Establishes a commercial hemp licensing program overseen by the Minnesota commissioner of agriculture. · Applicants must prove they comply with all federal hemp regulations, meaning that commercial licenses may not be available until federal law changes. · Allows the commissioner to implement an industrial hemp pilot program. Institutions of higher education may apply to participate in this program. Montana Mont. Code Ann. § 80-18-101 to 80-18-111 (2016) · Allows the Montana Department of Agriculture to implement a commercial hemp licensing program. · Requires commercial growers to use certified seeds. · Requires a federal controlled substances registration from the DEA for the affirmative defense against marijuana charges to apply. Nebraska Neb. Rev. Stat. § 2-5701 (2016) · Allows a postsecondary institution or the Nebraska Department of Agriculture to grow hemp for research purposes. Nevada Nev. Rev. Stat. § 557.010 to 557.080 (2016) · Mandates the Nevada Board of Agriculture implement an industrial hemp pilot program. · Allows institutions of higher education and the Nevada Department of Agriculture to grow hemp for research purposes. New Hampshire N.H. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 433-C:1 to 433-C:3 (2016) · Allows institutions of higher education to cultivate hemp for research purposes. · All research must be coordinated with the New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets and Food. · All research projects must conclude within three years of commencement. New Hampshire 2014 N.H. Laws, Chap. 18 · Established a committee to study the growth and sale of industrial hemp in New Hampshire. · The study was required to report their findings by Nov. 1, 2014. New York N.Y. Agriculture and Markets Law § 505 to 508 (McKinney 2016) · Allows the growth of hemp as part of an agricultural pilot program by the Department of Agriculture and Markets and/or an institution of higher education. · The commissioner of agriculture and markets may authorize no more than 10 sites for growing hemp as part of a pilot program. · The commissioner may develop regulations to authorize the acquisition and possession of industrial hemp seeds. o 1 NYCRR 159.2 allows authorized growers to possess, grow and cultivate seeds and hemp plants. North Carolina N.C. Gen. Stat. § 106-568.50 to 106-568.54 and § 90-87(16) (2016) · Creates an agricultural hemp pilot program overseen by the North Carolina Industrial Hemp Commission within the North Carolina Department of Agriculture. · The commission must collaborate with North Carolina State University and North Carolina A&T State University. North Dakota N.D. Cent. Code § 4-41-01 to 4-41-03 and § 4-05.1-05 (2016) · Allows hemp cultivation for commercial or research purposes overseen by the North Dakota agricultural commissioner. · Growers must use certified seeds. Licensees may import, resell and plant hemp seeds. · Permits the North Dakota State University-Main Research Center to conduct research on industrial hemp and hemp seeds. Oregon Or. Rev. Stat § 571.300 to § 571.315 (2016) · Allows individuals registered by the Oregon Department of Agriculture to grow hemp for commercial purposes. · Growers and handlers who intend to sell or distribute seeds must be licensed as seed producers. Pennsylvania Pa. Cons. Stat. Ann. tit. 3 § 701 to 710 (Purdon 2016) · Allows institutions of higher education or the Department of Agriculture of the commonwealth to research hemp under an industrial hemp pilot program. · This chapter shall expire if the secretary of agriculture of the Commonwealth determines a federal agency is authorized to regulate hemp. Rhode Island R.I. Gen. Laws § 2-26-1 to 2-26-9 (2016) · Establishes a commercial hemp program overseen by the Department of Business Regulation. o Allows the Division of Agriculture in the Department of Environmental Management to assist the Department of Business Regulation in regulating hemp. · Growers must verify they are using certified seeds. · The department shall authorize institutions of higher education to grow hemp for research purposes. South Carolina S.C. Code Ann. § 46-55-10 to 46-55-40 (Law. Co-op 2016) · Allows hemp growth for commercial and research purposes. Tennessee Tenn. Code Ann. § 43-26-101 to 43-26-103 (2016) · Allows commercial hemp production overseen by the Tennessee Department of Agriculture. · Directs the commissioner of agriculture to develop licensing rules for processors and distributors. · Allows institutions of higher education to acquire and study seeds for research and possible certification. Utah Utah Code Ann. § 4-41-101 to 4-41-103 (2016) · Allows the Utah Department of Agriculture to grow hemp for research purposes. · Requires that the department certify institutions of higher education to grow hemp for research purposes. Vermont Vt. Stat Ann. tit. 6 § 561 to 566 (2016) · Allows for commercial hemp production overseen by the Vermont secretary of agriculture, food and markets. · Requires the registration form advise applicants that hemp is still listed and regulated as cannabis under the federal Controlled Substances Act. Virginia Va. Code § 3.2-4112 to 3.2-4120 (2016) · Authorizes research and commercial hemp programs overseen by the Virginia Board of Agriculture and Consumer Services and the Virginia commissioner of agriculture and human services. · The commissioner must establish separate licenses for the research program and for commercial growers. · Nothing in this chapter allows individuals to violate federal laws. Washington Wash. Rev. Code Ann. § 15.120.005 to 15.120.050 (2016) · Allows hemp production as part of a research program overseen by the Washington State Department of Agriculture. · Requires the department establish a seed certification program. West Virginia W. Va. Code. § 19-12E-1 to 19-12E-9 (2016) · Allows hemp production for commercial purposes by growers licensed by the West Virginia Commissioner of Agriculture. · Growers must use seeds which produce plants containing less than 1 percent THC. Wisconsin Wis. Stat. §94.55; Wis. Stat. §94.67; Wis. Stat. §97.02; §348.27; Wis. Stat. §961.14; Wis. Stat. §961.32; Wis. Stat. §961.442; Wis. Stat. §961.55; Wis. Stat. §973.01 (effective Dec. 2, 2017) (Also, see 2017 Act 100 or S.B. 119.) · Directs the state Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection (DATCP) to establish a state industrial hemp program. · Includes GPS coordinates, fee payment and a criminal history search as requirements for licenses. · Directs the DATCP to establish and administer a seed certification program or designate another agency or organization to administer the program. · Requires the DATCP to create a pilot program to study the growth, cultivation and marketing of industrial hemp. · Specifies exemptions from prosecution under the state Uniform Controlled Substances Act. · Amends the definition of agricultural commodity to include industrial hemp. Wyoming Wyo. Stat. § 35-7-2101 to 35-7-2107 (effective July 1, 2017) · Authorizes the planting, growing, harvesting, possession, processing, or sale of industrial hemp for licensed individuals. · Provides for licensing requirements and rule-making authority by the state department of agriculture. · Allows the University of Wyoming and the state department of agriculture to grow industrial hemp for research purposes. · Provides an affirmative defense for marijuana possession or cultivation of marijuana for licensed industrial hemp growers. STATE STATUTES AND PUBLIC ACTS ON INDUSTRIAL HEMP RESEARCH AND CULTIVATION Source: www.ncsl.org/research/agriculture-and-rural.../state-industrial-hemp-statutes.aspx Additional Resources · NCSL Marijuana Deep Dive · Congressional Research Service’s Hemp as an Agricultural Policy, Feb. 2015 · NCSL Marijuana Overview · NCSL State Medical Marijuana Laws · What’s All the Hype about Hemp?, June 2014 State Legislatures magazine
  12. Hello...I would like to say I here as a guest many times and learned a lot of information about using marijuana to help with some ailments. I keep coming back here and find it one of the best websites to find information about Michigan medical marijuana stuff. So I decided to sign up and get involved. When I have some more time I will post more. I like taking polls. Bye bye for now.
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