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Organic Soil Recipes


bodhisattva
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Let's get this organic section rolling!!

 

Local organic 'heads' post your soil recipes. Posting what strains you use them for, and what pro's and con's for each are helpful as well, as some strains are more or less tolerant than others. Posting recipes, tips and tricks will help build a stronger local organic base, and may help some 'chemical' growers who are considering making a transition to organic growing.

 

I'll start it off in my second post.

 

 

 

Peace.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Every time I try to post in here, I get an error message..Hopefully this one will work.

 

I am posting my 'organic' regimen. Hopefully others will as well.

 

I use a mix based on the 'cornell mix', which is also sometimes known by people in online forums as 'LC's mix'.

 

For my base I use Sun Gro's 'Sunshine growers natural and organic' mix.. This is true omri organic soil, with organic wetting agent (yucca extract) and charged with organic nutes.. This is better than most soils out there, and cheaper than many. Formulated with Canadian Sphagnum peat moss, coir, coarse grade perlite, coarse grade vermiculite, gypsum, Dolomitic lime and an organic wetting agent.

 

for 5 gallons

60% Sun Gro

25% perlite

15% Earth Worm Castings

1 tbs per gallon of pulverized dolomite lime.

1 tsp mycorrizhal fungi

 

 

To this I add a 'mineral mix' and a 'seed meal mix'

 

Seed meal mix. For this example I am using 6lbs of each of the following.

 

alfalfa meal, soybean meal, linseed meal, canola meal and sunflower meal. Mix all of these in equal amounts.

 

Then add 2lbs of Kelp meal, and 1 lb of Neem seed meal.

 

This is now my 'seed meal mix' to which I add 1.5 cups per 5 gallons of soil.

 

For the 'mineral mix' I add together equal parts of Azomite, soft rock phosphate, glacial rock dust, and add 2 cups per 5 gallons of soil.

 

 

Then for 'nutrients' I add 1/4 cup every third watering of my seed meal mix to a 5 gallon brewer of compost teas, but that's for another thread.

 

Getting the materials together to start is the hardest part..after that it's very simple, and easy.

 

 

Peace

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hey Bodhi!

 

I also use LC's mix but 5 parts Peat, 3 Parts Perlite, and 2 Parts Castings. Supplemented with the usual Bone, Blood, Kelp, and Dolomite. I supplement with the Earth Juice line when necessary, which isn't often. I was planning on removing the animal elements from my mix and supplementing with rock dusts and seed meal instead. Glad I seen this thread, looks like you have a well rounded mix there. Do you buy them as meals or grind them yourself? I see a lot of differing information as to the nutrient release rate of some of the meals and rock phosphates, which is why I have been hesitant. Do you find any deficiency's early on in the life cycle due to this? Or is this counter acted by keeping the micro-fauna at high levels through the use of compost teas? Got to mix up some more soil here by the end of next month and I think I am gonna give it a go!

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This was posted in old forum.

 

Soil guide - all about soil.

All about soil - A great resource I thought I would share

 

All good potting mixes should:

 

1) Provide water and air.

 

***** Potting mixes are made of both solid particles and the open spaces (pores) between them. Large pores are filled with air and small pores hold water.* A good potting mix should have a balance of both solid particles and large and small pore space. Potting mixes with too many large pores require frequent watering, but those with too many small pores are too heavy and can promote disease. It is important to handle a potting mix carefully once it is made to avoid compacting it and losing the air spaces.

 

2) Retain fertilizer.

 

***** Potting mixes made mostly from sand will have little ability to hold plant food, while mixes formed from lots of peat moss or compost will hold plant food well. The pH of the mix also affects nutrient availability. Peat moss, which is the most commonly used ingredient in potting mixes, is very acidic (low pH). Dolomitic limestone is often added to adjust the pH and bring it closer to neutral. Compost and sand are usually neutral (depending on what they are made from) and may require less limestone when they are used in potting mixes.

 

3) Support the plant.

 

4) Be of consistent quality.

 

 

Organic Potting Mixes

 

The production of certified organic vegetable transplants is dependent on an organic potting mix. Potting soils containing prohibited materials will not be allowed under the proposed rules of the National Organic Program. Synthetic chemical fertilizers and wetting agents--amendments commonly used in commercial mixes--are restricted in most programs and therefore alternative mixes are needed.

 

Purchasing a commercially prepared organic mix is the easiest way to get started. Organic mixes are available from a few dealers around the country. Unless a mix specifically states that it is organic, it probably contains prohibited ingredients. A partial listing of suppliers is included in the table below. A second option is to arrange a special order from one of the large commercial potting mix suppliers, whereby they agree to exclude starter fertilizers and wetting agents. A third option is to mix your own. As freight is often prohibitive in the first two cases, many growers prefer the last method, but this presents a new set of challenges. For recipes of potting mixes, see Appendix C.

 

There are no industry-wide standards concerning potting media, so the grower should be wary of buying bagged materials with which he or she is not familiar. Bags labeled as compost, for example, may contain inorganic materials, depending on where the compost came from and what composes it.

 

 

Types of Potting Mixes

 

The types and amounts of potting mix ingredients should change depending on the intended use. Mixes used to start seeds must be very light and full of air because seedlings die easily in heavy, wet soil. Plants grown in fairly small plug trays need a soil mix that is lighter than one used in a larger plug trays. In general, the younger and smaller the plant, the lighter the soil mix needs to be. Soil mixes that are used after the seeds are started usually contain some perlite or sand, as well as peat.

 

Description of Standard Potting Mix Ingredients

 

Sphagnum peat moss. Also called peat moss or simply peat. Peat moss is a very stable source of organic material that holds a great deal of water and air and does not decompose quickly. Peat moss is quite acidic (pH 3.5-4.0); limestone is added to the mix to balance the pH. Younger, lighter colored peat moss does a better job of providing air space than does older, darker peats that have few large pores for air space. A wide range of quality exists. Peat is the most widely used soilless medium, because of its wide availability and relatively low cost.

 

Composted pine bark. Its high lignin content makes it slow to degrade, so it nourishes beneficial organisms for months. Can be substituted in part for peat moss. Lightens the mix.

 

Sawdust. Similar to peat moss in most ways. Quality depends on type of tree: cedar, walnut, and redwood can be toxic to plants, and oak, hickory and maple deplete soil nitrogen more so than sawdust from evergreen needle trees.

 

Vermiculite: Handled gently, vermiculite provides plenty of air spaces in a mix. Handled roughly, vermiculite compacts and loses its ability to hold air. Vermiculite holds water and fertilizer in the potting mix. It also contains calcium and magnesium, and has a near-neutral pH. Vermiculite comes in different grades. Medium grade is usually used for starting seeds. A coarse grade can be used in soil mix for older plants.

 

Perlite: Perlite is a volcanic rock that has been heated and expanded to become a lightweight, white material. Perlite is sterile and pH-neutral. When added to a soil mix, perlite can improve air space and water drainage. It is a hard material that does not break apart easily. Perlite pieces create tiny air tunnels, that allow water and air to flow freely to the roots. Perlite will hold from 3 to 4 times its weight in water, yet will not become soggy. Perlite can be used instead of sand to reduce the soil mix weight. It holds very little water and costs are relatively high. It is much lighter than sand and can be used instead of it.

 

Limestone: Calcium carbonate (CaC03) or calcium magnesium carbonate (called dolomitic limestone) is used to adjust pH. The range can be adjusted for specific crops, but a pH range of 5.5 to 6 is ideal for most crops. Lime should be well-ground.

 

Sand: Coarse sand (sometimes called builder s sand) will add air space to the potting mix. Fine sand settles into the spaces between other ingredients and makes a dense mix that excludes air. Clean, washed sand has a near-neutral pH and little if any food value for plants. Sand is much heavier than any other ingredient used in potting mixes. The added weight is good for tall, top-heavy plants that might blow or tip over, but it is not the best choice for plants that will be shipped or moved a lot. Sand is the least expensive and most readily available source of larger-particle material.

 

Commercial Starter Fertilizer: Most commercial mixes contain starter fertilizer blends. Whether the blends are made of micro- or macro-nutrients, they are usually formed from synthetic fertilizer. These fertilizers are prohibited from use in potting media used for certified organic production.

 

Wetting Agents: Wetting agents are a common ingredient in commercial potting mixes. They are included to help regulate moisture, improve aeration, and increase nutrient availability. Most wetting agents do not qualify for approval by organic certifying agencies. Check with a local certifying agent to see if there are any approved materials with wetting properties. Safers Soap® products have surfactant qualities and might be suitable. Some certifying agencies also accept Shaklee s Basic-H® and similar materials considered to be biodegradable. Wetting agents should be used conservatively. Some commercial materials have been found to be deleterious at too high a concentration (1). A University of California Peat-Lite mix employs 3 oz. of wetting agent for a 17 cubic foot media mix consisting of equal portions of peat moss and vermiculite(2). The wetting qualities of compost-based mixes may be superior to peat-based mixtures and may not need wetting agents.

Description of Alternative Potting Mix Ingredients

 

Compost: Made from a variety of locally available materials, usually a combination of ingredients that are high in nitrogen (such as manure or alfalfa) and those high in carbon (such as straw or corn stocks). Compost holds water well and provides nutrients; the amount of nutrients provided depends on what it is made from. It is important to select the highest quality compost available. It can be used with or in place of peat moss. Compost is cheaper than peat moss and contains nutrients. Compost can also provide natural protection against diseases of the seedlings and roots of plants due to beneficial organisms that live in well-made compost. For more information on disease-suppressive composts, contact ATTRA.

 

Alfalfa: Alfalfa may be a good, locally available, alternative to peat moss. Alfalfa provides nutrients, especially nitrogen, that releases slowly in the mix, making the fertilizer less likely to flow out of the pot when irrigated. Raw alfalfa must be processed before use in a potting mix. To process: Grind raw alfalfa through a 2 cm screen. Add water and decompose for 20 days. Air dry for another 20 days after decomposition.

 

Newspaper: Ground-up newspapers might be a good ingredient in a potting mix, and could be used instead of peat moss. Newsprint should not be more than 25% by volume of the mix.

 

Coir: Coir comes from coconut husks and is a waste product of the coco fiber industry. Coir s structure is similar to that of peat, but its pH is higher (5.5-6.0). It holds up to nine times its weight in water. Coir can have a high salt content. See below for coir suppliers.

 

Mineral wool: This is a coarse material resembling fiberglass, spun from blast furnace slag. Very little research has been done with mineral wool. It might be a sustainable option for growers near factories that produce blast furnace slag.

 

Kenaf: Kenaf is a fibrous plant grown in the Deep South. At the end of the growing season, kenaf plants are cut down and parts of them used to make paper. The waste products can be used as growing media. Growers who have used kenaf have seen excellent results.

 

 

 

 

Potting Mixes

 

List below is sorted as:

 

Product

Supplier*

Contents

pH

 

 

ASB Greenworld

Canadian sphagnum peat moss, vermiculite, perlite, montmorillonite clay, starter fertilizer, trace minerals

*

Baccto Seedling & Propagating Mix

Michigan Peat Co.*

Horticultural sphagnum, perlite, vermiculite, lime, balanced nutrients, trace elements, wetting agent

5.9-6.2

 

Ball Peat Lite Mix*

Ball Seed Co.*

Canadian sphagnum peat moss, vermiculite, wetting agent, nutrients*

*

Ball Professional Plug & Seedling Mix*

Ball Seed Co.*

Canadian sphagnum peat moss, vermiculite, perlite, builders' sand, wetting agent, nutrients*

*

BC-2

Bio Comp

Sphagnum peat moss, composted pine bark, vermiculite

5.6-6.4

 

BC-4FP

Bio Comp

Sphagnum peat moss, composted pine bark, composted peanut hulls, vermiculite, perlite, dolomitic limestone, gypsum, starter fertilizer

5.6-6.4

 

BC-H4

Bio Comp

Sphagnum peat moss, composted pine bark, composted peanut hulls, dolomitic limestone, gypsum, starter fertilizer

5.6-6.4

 

BM2 Germinating Mix

Berger Peat Moss

Fine granulation peat moss, perlite, vermiculite, lime, wetting agent, nutrients

*

Burpee Seed-Starting Formula

Burpee*

Canadian sphagnum peat moss, vermiculite, wetting agent, dolomite limestone, gypsum & other minerals

5.5-5.7

 

Control Gro

Hyde Park

Sphagnum peat moss, perlite, vermiculite, wetting agent, starter fertilizer, nutrients*

*

Earth-Rite Potting Soil

Zook & Ranck

Composted manures, peat moss, seaweed, colloidal phosphate

6.5-7.0

 

Fafard's Germinating (Superfine) Mix

Conrad Fafard

Peat moss, fine perlite, vermiculite, wetting agent, starter fertilizer

5.5-6.5

 

Fafard's All Purpose Growing Mix

Conrad Fafard

Perlite, vermiculite, sphagnum peat moss, wetting agent, calcium nitrate, potassium nitrate, phosphoric acid and other minerals

5.5-6.5

 

Fertilmix

A.H. Hoffman, Inc.

Sphagnum peat moss, vermiculite, limestone, ammonium nitrate, super phosphate

5.6-5.9

 

Garden Magic Potting Soil

Michigan Peat Co.

Peat moss, perlite, starter fertilizer

6.0-6.5

 

Gardner & Bloome Acid Planting Mix

Harmony Farm Supply

Fir bark, forest humus, peat moss, worm castings, sand

*

Gardner & Bloome Organic Potting Soil

Harmony Farm Supply

Fir bark, worm castings, topsoil, redwood, peat moss, perlite, chicken manure

*

Gardner & Bloome Organic Soil Building Compost

Harmony Farm Supply

Forest humus, worm castings, chicken manure, bat guano, kelp meal, oystershell, dolomitic limestone

*

Gardner & Bloome Planting Mix

Harmony Farm Supply

Forest humus, fir bark, peat moss, chicken manure, top soil, worm castings, sand, oyster shell lime

*

Good Earth Organics Mix

Good Earth Organics

Peat, perlite, vermiculite

*

Greendell Farm Plug Mix

Greendell Farm

Sphagnum peat moss, perlite, vermiculite, composted bark, starter fertilizer, wetting agent

5.6-5.9

 

Greenway Seedling Mix

Blackmore Co.

Peat, vermiculite, perlite, wetting agent

*

Heco Plug Mix

J-M Trading

Brick-cut Canadian sphagnum peat moss (fine-screened), vermiculite, perlite, wetting agent, minor elements, ammonia-free fertilizer

*

Heco Seedling Mix

J-M Trading

Brick-cut Canadian sphagnum peat moss (fine-screened), wetting agent, minor elements, ammonia-free fertilizer

*

Heco Tomato Mix

J-M Trading

Brick-cut Canadian sphagnum peat moss (fine-screened), perlite, wetting agent, minor elements

*

Hyponex Professional Mix

Scotts Corp.

Sphagnum peat moss, vermiculite, perlite, peat humus, pine bark, wetting agent

5.3-6.8

 

Jiffy Mix

Jiffy

Canadian sphagnum peat moss, vermiculite, lime, wetting agent, macro- & micronutrients*

5.0-5.8

 

Jiffy Mix Plus

Jiffy

Canadian sphagnum peat moss, vermiculite, lime, wetting agent, macro- & micronutrients, Mag Amp

5.0-5.8

 

McEnroe Organic Mix

McEnroe Organic Farm Assoc.

Custom potting soil made from compost

*

MetroMix 350, 360, 365, plug mixes

Grace-Sierra

Peat moss, vermiculite, bark, ash, wetting agent, starter fertilizer

5.0-6.4

 

MetroMix 351, 135P

Grace Sierra

Peat moss, vermiculite, perlite, bark ash, composted pine bark, wetting agent, starter fertilizer

5.0-6.4

 

Nature's Way Potting Soil

Nature's Way

Coarse peat moss, sand, perlite, rock phosphate, greensand, dolomite limestone, charcoal, kelp, cottonseed meal, fish emulsion

6.5-7.0

 

New Era Potting Soil

Clinton Nursery Products

Peat humus, Canadian sphagnum peat moss, vermiculite, coarse sand, dolomitic limestone

6.0-6.5

 

Johnny's Selected Seeds

Screened sphagnum peat moss, sedge, black peat, compost, perlite, and triple superphosphate

*

Pargro Peatwool Fine

Pargro

Peat moss, Pargro granulated rockwool, wetting agent, lime, starter fertilizer

5.4-6.2

 

Paygro Natural Potting Soil

Paygro Co.

Composted hardwood bark, sand, sphagnum peat moss, reed sedge peat

6.5-7.0

 

Peter's Professional Potting Soil

Grace- Sierra

Canadian sphagnum peat moss, vermiculite, granite sand, bark ash, nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium and other minerals, wetting agent

5.8-6.8

 

Pro Mix PGX

Premier Sales

Sphagnum peat moss (fine), vermiculite (fine), wetting agent, macro- & micronutrients, dolomitic and calcitic limestone

5.5-6.2

 

Quick-Root Soilless Potting Mix

Peaceful Valley

Canadian sphagnum peat moss, vermiculite, compost, oystershell lime, gypsum, soft rock phosphate, bone meal, sulfate of potash, kelp meal

*

Redi-Earth Potting Soil

Grace-Sierra

Canadian sphagnum peat moss, vermiculite, nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium and other minerals, wetting agent

5.2-6.3

 

Sogemix Plug & Germinating Mix

Sogevex

Sphagnum peat moss (fine), vermiculite (fine), wetting agent, macro- & micronutrients, dolomitic and calcitic limestone

5.5-6.2

 

SI-6 Seedling & Germinating Mix*

Southern Importers

Composted pine bark, composted peanut hulls, Canadian sphagnum peat moss, vermiculite, perlite, wetting agent, gypsum, starter fertilizer, dolomitic limestone

5.8-6.2

 

Strong-Lite Bedding Plant Mix

Strong-Lite

1/4" fully composted pine bark, medium vermiculite, sphagnum peat moss, perlite, starter fertilizer, wetting agent

*

Strong-Lite Germination Mix

Strong-Lite

Medium vermiculite, sphagnum peat moss, perlite, starter fertilizer, wetting agent

*

Strong-Lite Vegetable Mix

Strong-Lite

Coarse vermiculite, sphagnum peat moss, perlite, starter fertilizer, wetting agent

*

Sunshine #3

Sun Gro*

Sphagnum peat, vermiculite, starter fertilizer, wetting agent, dolomitic limestone

*

Sunshine #4 and #5

Sun Gro

Sphagnum peat, fine perlite, starter fertilizer, wetting agent, dolomitic limestone

*

Terra-lite Perlite Plug Mix

Grace-Sierra

Peat moss, vermiculite, perlite, wetting agent, starter fertilizer

5.3-6.3

 

Terra-lite Plug Mix

Grace-Sierra

Peat moss, vermiculite, wetting agent, starter fertilizer

5.3-6.5

Low pH mix 4.8-5.9

 

Uncle Malcolm's Organic Planting Mix

Peaceful Valley

Canadian peat moss, composted fir, sterilized mushroom compost (composted straw, sphagnum moss, horse and chicken manures, cottonseed and soybean meals, gypsum, sulfur), compost (dried poultry waste, bonemeal, bloodmeal, feather meal, dolomitic limestone)

*

Uncle Malcolm's Organic Potting Mix

Peaceful Valley

Sphagnum peat moss, perlite, volcanic pumice, earthworm castings

*

V-Mix

Lambert Peat Moss

Peat moss, perlite, vermiculite, limestone, nutrients, trace elements, wetting agent

*

*

*

Recipes for Starting Seeds

Mixes for starting seeds must be very light and provide a lot of air space to prevent root diseases. Seedling soil mixes may or may not contain nutrients because seedlings are often transplanted very quickly after germination.

Seed mix #1:

5 parts compost (well rotted)

4 parts topsoil (loam)

1-2 parts sharp sand

1-2 parts leaf mold

1 part sphagnum peat moss

2 tablespoons lime

 

Seed mix #2:

2 parts sifted compost

4 parts sphagnum peat moss

1 part perlite

1 part vermiculite

4 oz. lime

 

Seed mix #3: Standard soilless seed starting mix

50 to 75 percent sphagnum peat moss

25 to 50 percent vermiculite

5 lbs. of ground limestone per cubic yard of mix

*

Organic seedling mix:

6 gallons sphagnum peat moss

1/4 cup lime

4.5 gallons vermiculite

4.5 gallons compost

1 1/2 cups fertility mix made of:

2 cups colloidal (rock) phosphate

2 cups greensand

1/2 cup bone meal

1/4 cup kelp meal

 

Organic seedling mix:

10 gallons of 2-year-old leaf mold, sifted

10 gallons sifted compost

5-10 gallons sphagnum peat moss

5 gallons perlite

5 gallons coarse river sand

2 cups blood meal

6 cups bone meal

*

Mixes for potted plants require the addition of nutrients either from natural forms such as bloodmeal, bonemeal or rock phosphate, or from synthetic fertilizers such as calcium nitrate or potassium superphosphate. Locally available sources of nitrogen might be animal manures, fish products, dried blood, and legumes such as alfalfa or clover. Phosphorus can be supplied by bonemeal or rock phosphate. Wood ashes contain 10% potassium. Vermiculite also contains some potassium.

*

 

 

 

MIXING YOUR OWN

 

Mix #1: The classic formula for potting mix before soilless mixes became popular:

 

1/3 mature compost or leaf mold, screened

1/3 garden topsoil

1/3 sharp sand

This mix results in a potting soil that will be heavier than the modern peat mixes, but will still have good drainage. Compost has been shown to promote a healthy soil mix that can reduce root diseases. Vermiculite or perlite can be used instead of sand. To this base can be added fertilizers.

 

 

Classic Peat-Lite Mix from Cornell:

1/2 cu. yd. sphagnum peat

1/2 cu. yd. vermiculite

10 lbs. dolomitic limestone

2 lbs. superphosphate

1/2 lb. calcium nitrate

1/2 lb. potassium nitrate

 

Organic Substitute for Cornell Mix:

1/2 cu. yd. sphagnum peat moss

1/2 cu. yd. vermiculite

5 lbs. ground limestone

10 lbs. bone meal (or rock phosphate)

5 lbs. blood meal

 

Mix #2:

13.5 cubic feet sphagnum peat moss

13.5 cubic feet vermiculite

1.5 lbs. calcium nitrate

2 oz. micronutrients

2.5 lbs. superphosphate (0-20-0)

10 lbs. ground limestone

3 oz. wetting agent

 

Mix #3:

13.5 cubic feet sphagnum peat moss

13.5 cubic feet sharp sand

4 oz. potassium nitrate

4 oz. potassium sulfate

2 oz. micronutrients

2.5 lbs. superphosphate (0-20-0)

10 lbs. ground limestone

 

Mix #4:

13.5 cubic feet sphagnum peat moss

13.5 cubic feet vermiculite or perlite

5 lbs. dried bloodmeal (12% nitrogen)

10 lbs. steamed bonemeal

5 lbs. ground limestone

 

Mix #5:

40 quarts sphagnum peat moss

20 quarts sharp sand

10 quarts topsoil

10 quarts mature compost

4 oz. ground limestone

8 oz. bloodmeal (contains 10% nitrogen)

8 oz. rock phosphate (contains 3% phosphorus)

8 oz. wood ashes (contains 10% potassium)

 

Mix #6:

6 parts compost

3 parts soil

1-2 parts sand

1-2 parts soil

1-2 parts aged manure

1 part peat moss

1-2 parts leaf mold, if available

1 6" pot of bone meal

2 tablespoons lime

 

Mix #7:

2 parts compost

1 part peat moss

1 part vermiculite, pre-wet

 

Mix #8:

5 gallons screened, sterilized garden soil. Bake at 150° for 45 minutes in an oven.

5 gallons peat moss

5 gallons screened compost

5 gallons vermiculite

1 cup bonemeal

1 cup bloodmeal

1 cup greensand

1 cup pulverized limestone

 

Mix #9:

15 qts. screened black peat

15 qts. brown peat

17 qts. coarse sand

14 qts. screened leaf compost

3 oz. pulverized limestone

9 oz. greensand

3/4 cup dried blood

3 oz. alfalfa meal

3 oz. colloidal phosphate

9 oz. pulverized bonemeal

 

Mix #10:

20 qts. black peat

20 qts. sand or calcined clay

20 qts. regular peat

10 qts. soil

10 qts. compost

1/2 cup lime

1 cup greensand

1 cup colloidal phosphate

1 cup bloodmeal

 

Mix #11:

.5 cu. yd. shredded sphagnum peat moss

.5 cu. yd. horticultural vermiculite

5 lbs. dried blood

10 lbs. steamed bonemeal

5 lbs. ground limestone

 

Mix #12:

10 lbs. composted cow pen manure

10 pounds sphagnum peat moss

80 pounds garden soil

8 pounds calcium carbonate

4 pounds soft rock phosphate

2 pounds sawdust

 

Mix #13:

10 pounds compost

30 pounds sphagnum peat moss

60 pounds white sand

8 pounds calcium carbonate

4 pounds soft rock phosphate

2 pounds sawdust

 

Mix #14:

70 pounds white sand

25 pounds sphagnum peat moss

5 pounds chicken manure

8 pounds calcium carbonate

4 pounds soft rock phosphate

 

Mix #15:

2 parts vermiculite

2 parts perlite

3 parts topsoil

3 parts peat

2 parts cow manure

1/2 part bonemeal

 

Mix #16:

1 part peat

1 part perlite

1 part compost (or leaf mold)

1 part bonemeal

1 part worm castings (optional)

 

Mix #17:

9 quarts compost

3 quarts garden soil

3 quarts sharp sand

3 quarts vermiculite

1 cup greensand

1/2 cup blood meal

1/2 cup bonemeal

 

http://www.rollitup.org/newbie-central/291996-soil-guide-all-about-soil.html

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Yes have plenty of outdoor experience, and would luv to help.

 

Here was last outdoor this year. Skunk #1 and family strain called Big Mumma is the indica in background.

The top of the green House was 7ft.

001-20.jpg

 

I worked the soil in the winter, and poured in about 200KG+ of horse crap, bags and bags of good quality bag soil , Worm castings , my compost, and some old mushroom compost. And let frement for months with tarp over top. Turning every few weeks adding more compost etc.

 

Then Feed: Fish emulsions & worm wee mix Home made, Home made compost tea, Power feed Seasol, Tomato thrive, pk 13-14, Carbo load [which is a b1 thiamine additive]. & a hit of Epsom salt once in a while.

 

Happy to answer what ever questions you have.

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  • 1 month later...

Can't go wrong with those mixes!

 

BT-- that thread with the mixes is a great resource. Please keep in mind that those are all based on the 'Cornell soil mix' study from the 1930's..very good IMHO.

 

Just a heads up though, pro mix soil is NOT organic, and should not be used in applications where organics is desired or required.

 

They use aquagro as a wetting agent, and to say the least it's a toxic poison..They also give a small charge of non organic nutes as well.

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Hey Bodhi!

 

I also use LC's mix but 5 parts Peat, 3 Parts Perlite, and 2 Parts Castings. Supplemented with the usual Bone, Blood, Kelp, and Dolomite. I supplement with the Earth Juice line when necessary, which isn't often. I was planning on removing the animal elements from my mix and supplementing with rock dusts and seed meal instead. Glad I seen this thread, looks like you have a well rounded mix there. Do you buy them as meals or grind them yourself? I see a lot of differing information as to the nutrient release rate of some of the meals and rock phosphates, which is why I have been hesitant. Do you find any deficiency's early on in the life cycle due to this? Or is this counter acted by keeping the micro-fauna at high levels through the use of compost teas? Got to mix up some more soil here by the end of next month and I think I am gonna give it a go!

 

BT-- I'm not sure on the release rates , but I have never had a problem.. ever.

 

Starting in veg, I use aerated compost teas, and use them up till about 10 days before harvest, then just plain bubbled water..

 

I am a vegetarian, and designed this mix to be animal free as well. I like the EJ products, but slaughter house floor sweepings are not ok to go into what I smoke, vaporize, or eat..

 

Me and my patients love it, and it's as easy as pie..

 

I've also done a run with a certain companies vegan nutrients that I'll post up here later as well.

 

Peace.

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Yes have plenty of outdoor experience, and would luv to help.

 

Here was last outdoor this year. Skunk #1 and family strain called Big Mumma is the indica in background.

 

I worked the soil in the winter, and poured in about 200KG+ of horse crap, bags and bags of good quality bag soil , Worm castings , my compost, and some old mushroom compost. And let frement for months with tarp over top. Turning every few weeks adding more compost etc.

 

Then Feed: Fish emulsions & worm wee mix Home made, Home made compost tea, Power feed Seasol, Tomato thrive, pk 13-14, Carbo load [which is a b1 thiamine additive]. & a hit of Epsom salt once in a while.

 

Happy to answer what ever questions you have.

 

Wow! Amazing mix, Ian. This is how to do it if you have the resources. I have made compost from manure and straw on the farm before. Unfortunately I don't have access to the product at this time. I am simply mixing Organic Sunshine mix, worm castings, guano, kelp and lime. Teas are made from castings, guano, kelp and molasses.

 

Is that tobacco in the picture next to those other beautiful plants? I grow a little tobacco too of the N. Rustica variety. Very, very potent smoke.

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Hey Bodhi!

 

I also use LC's mix but 5 parts Peat, 3 Parts Perlite, and 2 Parts Castings. Supplemented with the usual Bone, Blood, Kelp, and Dolomite. I supplement with the Earth Juice line when necessary, which isn't often. I was planning on removing the animal elements from my mix and supplementing with rock dusts and seed meal instead. Glad I seen this thread, looks like you have a well rounded mix there. Do you buy them as meals or grind them yourself? I see a lot of differing information as to the nutrient release rate of some of the meals and rock phosphates, which is why I have been hesitant. Do you find any deficiency's early on in the life cycle due to this? Or is this counter acted by keeping the micro-fauna at high levels through the use of compost teas? Got to mix up some more soil here by the end of next month and I think I am gonna give it a go!

 

 

I buy all my meals in bulk, as well as my humic acid,mycorrizhal fungi, soluble kelp, etc.. in (50lb bags) for super cheap, and mix.. As far as the deficiency question goes, maybe the reason I don't have any issues is because I follow the recommendations of my mentor(s), and I 'cook' my soil for a month before putting anything in it.. I water those every 4-5 days with my compost teas, so the micro-herd is already running smooth and balanced before hand.

 

HTH

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  • 2 weeks later...

Let's get this organic section rolling!!

 

Local organic 'heads' post your soil recipes. Posting what strains you use them for, and what pro's and con's for each are helpful as well, as some strains are more or less tolerant than others. Posting recipes, tips and tricks will help build a stronger local organic base, and may help some 'chemical' growers who are considering making a transition to organic growing.

 

I'll start it off in my second post.

 

 

 

Peace.

So what about the major commercial soil bags..wgat are you guys using..? I like mixing up Roots, Happy Frog and 3-4 others that I will keep a secret.,....lol..I do like FoxFarm worm castings though and Roots fertilizers and General Organics grow and blooms. I have found that doing all the home made stuff just gets so time consuming that I can easily get it from a hydro store and save myself all the hassles or mixing up my own Organic mixes.

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Wow! Amazing mix, Ian. This is how to do it if you have the resources. I have made compost from manure and straw on the farm before. Unfortunately I don't have access to the product at this time. I am simply mixing Organic Sunshine mix, worm castings, guano, kelp and lime. Teas are made from castings, guano, kelp and molasses.

 

Is that tobacco in the picture next to those other beautiful plants? I grow a little tobacco too of the N. Rustica variety. Very, very potent smoke.

 

heheh, yes that is Virgina Gold, Havana 601, and N. Rustica. Though I only use the Rustica to make pesticide.

 

I look forward to getting my garden together, still getting settled.

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  • 1 month later...
  • 5 months later...

I use fox farms grow mixture the bubble bucket isnt working for me at all like the plants are getting too much water

 

Bubble bucket as in DWC (Deep water culture) hydroponics?

 

The plants roots are supposed to be submerged in a bucket full of water, with a airstone/airpump setup. Are you measuring your water's PPM and pH? What are the problems/symptoms the plant has?

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  • 2 weeks later...

Lately Ive switched to the EJ amazon bloom as a base with EWC perlite and dolomite. Ive also been amending nutes into the soil and making teas less often just to build the microherd etc. First try at emending all the nutes into the soil has already produced better plants than all my other runs feeding weekly, the growing has become less time consuming and more enjoyable.

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i just started with this mix and i am loving it so far....

i made a few modifications. x2 perlite

plus 1 bag vermiculite

we shall c how they girls end up. but so far they are very happy.

 

Reply by Shredder on May 19, 2010 at 4:07pm Ok, here's my recipe.

3.8 cu ft bale of pro mix

6 cups bone meal

4 cups blood meal

4 cups kelp meal

3 cups dolomite lime

1.5 cups epsom salt (the agricultural kind)

1 large bag of worm castings.

add perlite to 1/3 of total mix.

option add 4-5 cups of bat guano bloom not veg or you can add it in teas

 

I mix a half batch in a large wheel barrow, then put it in a 45 gallon plastic tub. It could be mixed on a tarp as well. I then wet it and leave it outside to "work" (the micro goodies multiply). Your supposed to let it sit one month, but I have used it fresh without problems at all. Then I use liquid karma and Earth Juice brand micro blast about twice a grow. Micro blast is a mineral addition that takes care of most deficiencies. I add molasses in the tea, and in watering maybe every week or so.

 

When your grow is over separate the roots and save your soil, when your ready supplement with the additions again and then reuse. I read where the next several years it gets better and better.

Edited by mibrains
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  • 2 weeks later...

I have an easy 'water only' mix I like. Good for at least 100 days. Add molasses and kelp meal mix in the last couple weeks if you want to.

 

if it seems a bit too many ingredients for you then you could probably leave out the rock dusts and use just wormcastings or mushroom compost, 2 parts

 

3 parts peat

2 parts quality topsoil ( make sure it hasnt any ferts added)

3 parts perlite

1 part mushroom compost

1 part wormcasts

dolomite lime 5g/litre

 

and the ferts, the guano doses are for cavemans (UK Brand which isnt that strong), i reduce the N guano a little for sensitive strains but that mix has never burned anything. obviously for seedlings i leave all the ferts out except the seaweed meal

 

N guano - 4g/litre veg, 2-4g/litre flower (strain dependent)

P guano - 4g/litre veg, 8g/litre flower

Rock phosphate 5g/l

rock potash 5g/l

seaweed meal 5g/l

 

Edited by GREENkZOO
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I've also used this recipe, replacing the miraclegro with foxfarm, though.

 

Blazeoneup's Soil Recipe:

 

1 bag of mriacle grow organic + 1 bag of pro mix + 1 cup blood meal + 1 cup bone meal + 1/2 cup dolimite lime + 10-20% added chunky perlite. Im running 3 gallon bags btw this mix will fill 10 3 gallon bags.

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  • 1 month later...

Thought Id get this thread stirring again. I just picked up some Dr. Earth Bud and Bloom Booster from a local garden shop and Im going to try and run this as a standalone macronute fert in flowering.

51JfDZdK6xL._SS500_.jpg

 

4-10-7 with 7% Calcium and 1% Sulfur

 

I am planning on amending this into the soil for my bottom 3 layers and feeding EJ Microblast every 3 weeks or so. (Top 2 layers are still my veg soil mix)

Ingredients:

Fish bone meal, feather meal, potassium sulphate, alfalfa meal, kelp meal, and seaweed extract.

It also contains 8 Mycorrhizae

 

Ive been amending nutes into the soil my last few runs with a lot of success and ease. I think Ive just had issues with my NPK flowering ratios so this should help me Keep It Simple Stupid. lol

 

Edit: Also would like to add its Made in the Good Ole USA

Edited by wingdings
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  • 4 weeks later...

Wingdings, it's perfectly acceptable to use, all in one, dry ferts. I recently used as my only amendment espoma's plant tone fertilizer throughout the veg period. (5-3-3) I did top dress with ewc, and add perlite. I simply mixed it up, let it sit a month, then used it on rooted clones. It may be more common to find it, in a farm store over the hydro shop, my local hydro guy says he can't make money on it so he does not stock it.

 

. I've read that espoma's bio tone is even better, ( they make a whole range of tone ferts, like flower tone, rose tone, ect.) because it has plenty of the organic goodies that we like, like the meals, plus it has our michorizae fungus and bacterias in it as well. At 4-3-3 it should take you though flower in a bigger pot. I've also heard good things about fox farms dry stuff and from earth juices dry fert mixes.

 

The espoma's tone ferts are applied at 3 cups per cf. If you measure in lb's 3 cups equal 1 lb. You can also top dress with it, and bubble it for teas. It's really a simple but effective method to use, and when use use it you don't have acquire all those bags of meals anymore. All these veg formulas and the bloom booster stuff is a lot of hype, and not much science, one in alls work just fine, after all in an organic grow the plant takes what it needs.I'm using it outdoors in my veggie garden as well. And this is from a guy that has tons of meals and guano......shredder

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Thanks for the suggestion shredder. The Dr. Earth seems to have too much calcium in it. The plant I put in it had cal lockout within a couple weeks and I didnt add any, kind of odd it had cal but no mag in it. Im back to guanos and kelp meal for now

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