Jump to content

The Final Answer On Brown Tip Leaves?


vender
 Share

Recommended Posts

I have searched, googled research.... I have found that it could be to much nutes, not enough nutes, to little water, to much water, cal mg deficiency... So I am looking for the best answer what is wrong with my plants? Yellow, brown then crispy. Thanks. 100ppm 5.7ph clones rooted taken 2 weeks ago.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello,

 

Dfntly cld be too much water and also when cloned did they droop for a time before they perked up in whatever you cloned them into? If so the leaves sometimes die if not perked up qwik enuf and turn crispy and die away, sometimes not the whole leaf but just the ends etc..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello again,

 

That is kinda what it looked like to me, I have had the same results when clones drooped too long, the remaining parts of the damaged leaves look just fine, let them grow and see what the new veg looks like, will probably be nice and healthy green. Good Luck.

 

P.S. I grow in hydro too , I water for 2 to 3 minutes and then off for about 20 minutes with a light nute ppm of around 800 to 1000, PH at around 5.8 to 6.0.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Def not over water, that wouldn't cause the plant to brown, the leaves look like they're showing signs of overwater but my guess would be a lack of phosphorus or possible lack of nutrients while it was waiting to root. As stated above I wouldn't sweat it, the rest of it looks healthy, let it veg out a bit and see how it grows if it continues to get worse add a tiny bit of bloom nutrients to the normal feed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just a heads up that some of the information is that thread is way off.

 

Can you be more specific? Ive used that info for as long as I can remember. Its the most comprehensive tutorial I have seen for diagnosing a plant's issues and it has never steered me wrong. B)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I bet the new growth is fine. That red stem concerns me though. It needs more available phosphorous. Come to think of it the brown tips could be potassium deficiency. Your plants need more nutes man! Actually maybe not. Could be root burn. In that case you should probably go easy on nutes.

 

let it veg out a bit and see how it grows if it continues to get worse add a tiny bit of bloom nutrients to the normal feed.

 

+1

Link to comment
Share on other sites

hey vender looks like it's been burnt before but i'd keep an eye on the new growth and ramp up the nutes a bit, feed 150, then 200ppm, see where that leaves them. damage has been done, can't fix that. the fresh clones i got are being fed around 200 ppm GH nutes.

 

 

that link to the IC infirmary is a good one, users should fill out that form when posting problems, it helps us help you

 

this may help you.....

 

 

Ed Rosenthal's Grow Tips

Nutrient Deficiencies

How to spot, diagnose, and treat problems of nutrient deficiency in your indoor garden, in two parts.

 

Part I - Recognizing the Problem.

 

Before you assume your plant has a nutrient deficiency, make sure the problem is not due to other causes. Examine the plant carefully for plant pests, especially on the undersides of damaged leaves, along the stem, and in the soil.

 

Even under the best conditions, not all leaves form perfectly or remain perfectly green. Small leaves that grew on the young seedling normally die within a month or two. Under artificial lights, bottom leaves may be shielded from the light, or be too far away from the light to carry on chlorosynthesis. These leaves will gradually turn pale or yellow, and may form brown areas as they die. However, healthy large leaves should remain green at least three to four feet below the plant tops, even on those plants under small light systems. Under low light, the lower-growing shoots as well as the large leaves on the main stem are affected. Some symptoms of nutrient deficiencies begin first at the bottom of the plant, but these symptoms generally affect the lower leaves on the main stem first, and then progress to the leaves on the branches.

 

Although some deficiency symptoms start on the lower older leaves, others start at the growing shoots or at the top of the plants. This difference depends on whether or not the nutrient is mobile and can move from the older leaves to the active growing shoots. Deficiency symptoms of mobile nutrients start at the bottom of the plant. Conversely, deficiency symptoms of immobile nutrients first appear on the younger leaves or growing shoots at the top of the plant. Nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), potassium (K), magnesium (Mg), boron (B), and molybdenum (Mb) are mobile in the plant. Manganese (Mn) and zinc (Zn) are less mobile, and calcium (Ca), sulfur (S), iron (Fe), and copper (Cu) are generally immobile. Once you have determined which part of the plant is affected and how the problem is spreading, you can isolate which 'family' of nutrients the plant is lacking: mobile or immobile.

 

A dry atmosphere or wet soil may cause the blade tips to turn brown. Brown leaf tips also may indicate a nutrient deficiency, but in this case, more tissue will turn brown than just the end tips.

 

Chlorosis and necrosis are two terms which describe symptoms of disease in plants. Chlorosis means lacking green (chlorophyll). Chlorotic leaves are pale green to yellow or white. Cholorotic leaves often show some recovery after the necessary nutrient is supplied. Necrosis means that the tissue is dead. Dead tissue can be gold, rust, brown, or grey. It is dry and crumbles when squeezed. Necrotic tissue cannot recover.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share



×
×
  • Create New...