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Pot Farming Coming To Monroe?


christinax4
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Not only that, but where is he going to find 340 registered caregivers that want to move their operations to Monroe County? lol

Depending on how much he charged per unit it may be an option for patients to use.The Idea of having your grow away from your family is a safe option.If the guys not to greedy it would fill up quick with just patients alone.

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If done right, I think that this has possibilities. If each unit was separate, enclosed, locked, and leased to an individual caregiver, I don't see where it would be in violation of the Michigan Medical Marihuana Act. How would this be different from there being several caregivers or patients growing independently in one apartment complex, or mobile home park, or even a duplex?

 

I agree that it is likely to draw increased scrutiny from federal authorities, but I don't think it would be a problem under state law. That being said, there are an awful lot of practical questions (security, pest/infestation control, HVAC, equipment, etc.) but could be accounted for with appropriate planning.

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There’s an eye-popping proposal that’s a bit unsettling to some community leaders even though it could produce much-needed revenue for Monroe County.<BR class=hardreturn>An entrepreneur from Florida has set his sights on a large vacant building in Frenchtown Township that he hopes to convert into a marijuana-producing facility. It could house close to 25,000 plants in an operation that is sure to produce million of dollars.<BR class=hardreturn>But the big question remains: Is it legal?<BR class=hardreturn>It is, by far, the most ambitious venture regarding medical marijuana being discussed in Michigan since voters in 2008 passed into the law allowing its use among patients.<BR class=hardreturn>James McCurtis, a spokesman for the Michigan Department of Community Health in Lansing, the agency that oversees the state’s medical marijuana industry, said the Frenchtown Township proposal is huge.<BR class=hardreturn>“I must say, it is creative,” Mr. McCurtis said. “I have not heard of something like that, not in Michigan. But that has a chance of being legal.” What is legal and illegal under the law is being discussed and researched by local law enforcement officials, attorneys and community leaders.<BR class=hardreturn>Monroe County Prosecutor William P. Nichols said he is investigating the legality of the proposed operations and is trying to determine what can be grown, where it can be grown, who can grow it and who can possess it and how much can they possess.<BR class=hardreturn>“My problem is the statute is extremely vague,” Mr. Nichols said. “It’s open to interpretation. Ultimately it will be decided by the courts.”<BR class=hardreturn>In the meantime, thousands of patients and suppliers are sending in applications to the state to take advantage of the medical marijuana law. Mr. McCurtis said his office receives 1,000 applications a week, mostly from those who are sick or hurting and want to use marijuana to ease their suffering.<BR class=hardreturn>The pot capital?<BR class=hardreturn>The Department of Community Health so far is not breaking down which communities are being targeted by applicants to either produce medical marijuana or by those who would like to consume it legally.<BR class=hardreturn>Mr. McCurtis said there is no way to determine how many of the thousands of individuals and applicants are from Monroe County. However, in recent weeks there has been a smattering of registered official business proposals to start so-called dispensaries where registered patients may retrieve or receive pot legally.<BR class=hardreturn>From Dundee to Bedford Township to Monroe, applicants have begun the process to start potentially profitable medical marijuana businesses with names like Southeastern Medical Canibus Learning Institute and Jake’s Medigro Supply.<BR class=hardreturn>But the idea that raises the most eyebrows among officials is the one proposed for Frenchtown Township.<BR class=hardreturn>Although discussion is in the early stages and nothing has been approved, the proprietor has met with certain officials, including Mr. Nichols, and is working with a local real estate agent.<BR class=hardreturn>The proposed growth facility would include sinking millions of dollars into remodeling a vast vacant structure to create 340 individual rooms. To follow the law, each separate, enclosed and locked room would be run by a registered dispenser. Each dispenser can have five qualified patients and grow 12 plants for each patient.<BR class=hardreturn>According to written proposals, that would mean the facility could house about 24,480 marijuana plants. Mr. Nichols said the person from Florida proposing the idea might be within the letter of the law, but he is leaning against supporting the idea.<BR class=hardreturn>“Our office does not believe the Legislature intended to create marijuana dispensaries or grow facilities that cultivate thousands of plants,” he said.<BR class=hardreturn>The person making the proposal chose not comment. His Michigan attorney did not return Evening News phone calls. The facility targeted as a super cultivation plant is not being named because no lease has been signed.<BR class=hardreturn>Frenchtown Township Supervisor James McDevitt said the proposal is in the beginning stages and nothing has been determined. And even though the person looking into the facility indicated that the township could receive $50,000 a month or $600,000 a year in revenue — much-needed money in this economy — he remains skeptical of the idea simply because of its magnitude.<BR class=hardreturn>“I don’t want Frenchtown Township to become the capital of Michigan for producing marijuana plants,” he said. “I’m not going to put this township in jeopardy. It does concern me.”<BR class=hardreturn>What is legal?<BR class=hardreturn>In Bedford Township a much smaller proposal is being researched. The owner of a company is targeting industrial complexes to start a medical marijuana producing operation.<BR class=hardreturn>A letter detailing the facility was sent to Mr. Nichols, who also is looking into the legality of that possible operation. The proposal states that regardless of the number of tenants, the facility “will not be permitted to contain more than a total of 99 plants ...”<BR class=hardreturn>The Bedford proposal states that the facility will be outside residential neighborhoods and will have a gated entrance, a security system and surveillance system. It would not be a distribution point for marijuana, nor would it be a place of congregation.<BR class=hardreturn>“Only the tenants, property manager, and appropriate law enforcement officials will be allowed on site ...” the proposal states. “... Such a facility clearly fits the given description of where a registered caregiver is allowed to grow marijuana, and therefore such a facility is completely legal under current state law.”<BR class=hardreturn>Although he’s familiar with the proposal, Bedford Township Supervisor Walt Wilburn said he doesn’t know enough to offer an opinion.<BR class=hardreturn>“We don’t know what’s legal and that’s the problem,” he said. “I’m a little concerned about the activity (the facility) might create.”<BR class=hardreturn>Township attorney W. Thomas Graham said the inquiry, believed to be from a businessman from the Cleveland area, is preliminary. And while research is being conducted into the legalities of such facilities, Mr. Graham said the idea should not be immediately discounted by concerned citizens because medical marijuana was approved by voters and legally serves a purpose to thousands of individuals.<BR class=hardreturn>“We want to be fair to all our property owners,” Mr. Graham said. “But there are a lot of issues. We’re just not sure.”<BR class=hardreturn>What’s next?<BR class=hardreturn>Those involved with making decisions about medical marijuana facilities are leery of supporting such businesses because the law is new (it took effect in April, 2009) and because of the nature of the beast: Marijuana has a stigma attached to it, making many believe it is an illegal gateway drug that leads users to abuse more serious narcotics like cocaine or heroin, which leads to an increase in crime.<BR class=hardreturn>Mr. Nichols said what is making the decisions to allow such facilities to come to Monroe County difficult is the wording of the law. Almost everything is up for interpretation, including what constitutes debilitating conditions. Patients with severe pain are in compliance to receive an identification card that would allow them access to medical marijuana.<BR class=hardreturn>How is the marijuana distributed, who can distributed it and where it can be distributed also are up for debate because they lack clear definitions, Mr. Nichols said. That’s why, he said, the final decision of whether a business can set up shop here most likely will be up to a judge.<BR class=hardreturn>Other attorneys are just as perplexed as to what is legal and what is not. Kerry L. Bondy, Frenchtown Township attorney, said she is familiar with the proposal to start a medical marijuana facility in the township but has seen nothing in writing.<BR class=hardreturn>Other proposed facilities, such as one in Dundee, appear to be a home.<BR class=hardreturn>“There are a lot of questions that are going to pop up,” Ms. Bondy said. “And I need to know that what is being proposed is lawful. It’s going to take a lot to figure this out.”<BR class=hardreturn>Mr. McDevitt said he must keep an open mind about such a proposal. If it is determined that the facility can produce almost 25,000 plants legally and if security questions are answered, it should be considered, especially if the township stands to make a hefty profit.<BR class=hardreturn>“It could be inviting,” Mr. McDevitt said. “If it’s legal.”<BR class=hardreturn>

 

I included the article to show the paragraph of who is looking to do this and money is the motive.....unless I read it wrong. I think this would or could start the state thinking about the fact of taxing MM / commercialization and no longer letting us grow our own.

 

Dizz<BR class=hardreturn>

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I want to know how the township would receive money from this? Sounds like they are talking sales tax, Medicine is tax exempt in Michigan. I think this bright entrepreneur need to do a bit more research. Looks like just another scheme to become a middleman between patients and their medicine, adding to the expense for patients without adding any value to the product.

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Can someone please show me where it states that a caregiver can only supply 5 patients, because if you look at rule 333.127 it states a caregiver can supply anyone they are connected to through the states registration? The number 5 does not seem to be in this paragraph, and my interpretation is if we are in the same database are we not somehow connected?

 

Anyways this guy is never going to be able to get away with this. The feds will never allow a marijuana factory with the current federal laws, so I don’t think we should pay this any attention.

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  • 1 year later...

TheMasterMi I live in Lasalle which is in Monroe County and I have not heard anything bad yet about the medical aspect. They still bust illegal grows outside sometimes in the areas surrounding here. There was a guy in town in monroe growing outside and called the police when his crops were stolen. The police did not bother him from what I understand and actually said they would try and find the thief. I think they are pretty decent around here if you are acting normal and not growing and selling it everywere but thats common sense which many are missing LOL

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I am thinking of moving to Monroe is it an cool place to live patient wise will they respect the state law as I Don't want to live in area that isnt chill thanks for your thoughts

 

The sheriff is a fair guy & knows the law since before anyone was legal. The sheriff was educated by the local compassion club after Prop 1 passed. LEO has better things to do in Monroe than persecute lawful patients. I have not heard of even one lawful patient being hassled by LEO in Monroe County...not to say it hasn't happened, but if it has, no one local has mentioned it.

 

As far as moving to Monroe County, remember, people are basically the same everywhere.

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