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Questions For Caregivers That Receive Ss Or Ssi Benefits.


jaywan00
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I myself receive benefits, and is currently trying to become a caregiver.... My question is will/ or have the money received from caregiving affected anyones benefits? Have they deducted from your benefits or will you eventually be dropped from all benefits due to your new income?

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I was told by my lawyer that it very well could require claiming it as earned income, perhaps not this year or the next, but down the line Uncle Sam wants his % of any thing you make. Your not selling MM but you do accept $$ for your time. He also does a ton of SS claims, said if the government wanted to get ugly, they could question whether this was with in the restrictions the Doctor ordered at the time you filled your SS claim, if it was against what the Doctor ordered, your SS benefits could be at risk. Don't it just figure? Too bad no one in the judicial system stops to realize how much it is doing for the moral of the disabled patients.

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I know SSI is very strict and will punish without mercy, SS will, too. Please be careful. If you're making a substantial amount, you'll have to tell them and they'll immediately take a percentage, but you'll still come out ahead. The rules for SS and SSI are different. If you get both, I'm not sure how that works but I think the SS rules take precedence, especially if you get more SS than SSI. Read up on the laws, though the laws do seem to be conflicting within their own rulings, they do state the amount they'll allow and what must be reported. The first $80 or $85 over the limit is exempt, I think that may be just for blind & legally blind people, I don't remember. It's not fair the rules are different for other disabilities, though it's good for me, it's not for my friends. For those who are employed, job related expenses are also exempt, that includes the self-employed. As a caregiver, you'd be considered to be self employed I think but don't quote me on that. Look up the rules for employment and self employment. I don't know if the MM law has even addressed that, there's so much to read, I haven't read the whole thing yet.

 

I can give you an example of loss vs gains, from working while on SSI: They will, even though it may be a small amount, demand their cut. When I made $150.00 on a one-time job, they demanded $35.00. That small amount wasn't too much of a loss, but they took it out of one month's benefits, as if what we're given is a lot. It's such a small amount, but they'd punish to the full extent of the law if they weren't notified and then found out. No one could live on what they dole out, but it's better than nothing. Meanwhile, people have way more than they'll ever spend, they swim in it while we drown from lack of it. Sorry for the rant, I've seen too much injustice over this. I know of a man who made a little over the limit while working and didn't report it, he lost his benefits for a year. They don't give a darn about us and begrudge us what we do get. I've spoken to people at the SS office who hold this attitude. IF and when you do report it, be sure to have the law regarding MM with you and know the law regarding your benefits, how much you can earn, what may be exempt, because they may be mis-informed and lie to you, then get angry at you for contradicting them. I've had this happen and it really hurt. Be prepared. You have rights, don't let them tell you otherwise. Knowledge is power.

Sb

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Social Security recipients can earn up to a certain amount (around $900) a month. If they exceed that amount for more than nine months over a running five year period. They are considered to be gainfully employed and lose their SS.

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Social Security recipients can earn up to a certain amount (around $900) a month. If they exceed that amount for more than nine months over a running five year period. They are considered to be gainfully employed and lose their SS.

That sounds about right, I know others who get SS but I don't remember the details as well as I know SSI, so I'm glad to see someone come on who knows, so Jay gets accurate info. He mentioned both programs, I explained what I know.

 

Sb

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If you profit it is income just like if you worked anywhere else.

 

You need an accountant, you need to set up a non profit and you need to keep very good track

of ALL expenses.

 

You need an accountant who is MJ friendly and knows how to run a non prof. You will also need

to give back a % of profits to charities and salaries of a non prof cant be more than 30% of all money

that comes in after expenses.

 

If you are near or will come to Metro Detroit and need an accountant let me know but they are going to charge you for the work

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http://www.ssa.gov/pubs/10095.html#part3

 

How your earnings affect your Social Security benefits

During the trial work period, there are no limits on your earnings. During the 36-month extended period of eligibility, you usually can make no more than $1000 a month or your benefits will stop. But, the work expenses you have as a result of your disability are deducted when we count your earnings to see if they can help you keep more of your benefits. If you have extra work expenses, your earnings could be substantially higher than $1000 before they affect your benefits. This substantial earnings amount usually increases each year.

 

We deduct work expenses related to your disability from your earnings before we determine if you are still eligible for benefits. These expenses may include the cost of any item or service you need to work, even if the item or service also is useful to you in your daily living. Examples include prescription drugs, transportation to and from work (under certain conditions), a personal attendant or job coach, a wheelchair or any specialized work equipment.

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One thing that people fail to look at when considering the tax liabilities of being a caregiver. How much income will there really be? Sure in a best case scenario you might find five patients who all need $1000 a month in medicine and can afford that much. But here in the real world 60% of card holding patients qualified for the reduced rate for their cards. I doubt many of them are going to be able to $12,000 a year for a medicine. I figure for most patients about $200 a month is about average for medicine. This brings your gross income (with five patients) to around $1000 a month, take away your expenses and you are left with very little real income. Keep receipts, pay an accountant and your net income might be as much as $3000 a year. It will effect your SSI but SSI is supposed to keep you at what the government considers a bare minimum standard of living. Anything extra coming in should reduce the SSI by a dollar for dollar amount.

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