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Cannabidiol As A Novel Inhibitor Of Id-1 Gene Expression In Aggressive Breast Cancer Cells


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http://www.letfreedomgrow.com/cmu/cbd_breast_cancer.pdf

 

This link is to a primary research article about Id-1 and how it is suppressed by cannabidiol, CBD. At the end of the day, this is what it's all about. Speaking for myself, this is one of the reasons I advocate for medical marijuana.

 

CBD is one of the secondary biologically active ingredients of cannabis. CBD isn't psychoactive. It doesn't cause a high effect. The article is interesting because of the significance of Id-1. It is one of the gene targets for interfering with invasion and metastasis, how cancer kills people. Id-1 is expressed by solid tumors as they change from bad to worse, basically. It has a role in reactivating genes that are supposed to be turned off, because it helps unravel DNA that is otherwise packaged up for storage in most cells. It will be interesting to see how this work pans out. It offers a ray of hope to those with metastatic cancer. You can bet the drug companies are interested in this. Particularly if they could find a more potent synthetic analog of CBD.

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http://www.letfreedomgrow.com/cmu/cbd_breast_cancer.pdf

 

This link is to a primary research article about Id-1 and how it is suppressed by cannabidiol, CBD. At the end of the day, this is what it's all about. Speaking for myself, this is one of the reasons I advocate for medical marijuana.

 

CBD is one of the secondary biologically active ingredients of cannabis. CBD isn't psychoactive. It doesn't cause a high effect. The article is interesting because of the significance of Id-1. It is one of the gene targets for interfering with invasion and metastasis, how cancer kills people. Id-1 is expressed by solid tumors as they change from bad to worse, basically. It has a role in reactivating genes that are supposed to be turned off, because it helps unravel DNA that is otherwise packaged up for storage in most cells. It will be interesting to see how this work pans out. It offers a ray of hope to those with metastatic cancer. You can bet the drug companies are interested in this. Particularly if they could find a more potent synthetic analog of CBD.

 

Sativex .. 50/50 THC/CBD in a local British drug store near your home .. (over there at least)

http://www.gwpharm.com/Sativex.aspx

 

Get the US government out of our bodies! Stop regulating us TO DEATH!

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Sativex .. 50/50 THC/CBD in a local British drug store near your home .. (over there at least)

http://www.gwpharm.com/Sativex.aspx

 

Get the US government out of our bodies! Stop regulating us TO DEATH!

 

 

Nobody should be under the impression that Sativex is the answer. It's not. The authors of this research article are after something distinct and more significant: A hypothetical CBD analog that enhances the effects of CBD on Id-1 promoter suppression. With a goal of inhibiting invasion and metastasis and saving the lives of cancer patients.

 

While it's true that synthetic THC (Marinol) and THC/CBD (Sativex) exist as approved drugs in the US and UK, these represent the tip of the iceberg as far as the potential for drug design goes.

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It is ashamed that the Government ignores the science especially when it is so compelling. Our Mothers, Sisters and Wives are loosing their lives to this plague and the government is more concerned about the profitable war on drugs. I will promise this we will fight until we overcome the ignorance and greed. Thanks for the great post. BB

 

I agree, and I stand beside you and the community in the fight! Money and politics seem to have become more important than the science, the people's well being, and what is right. The time for change is long overdue, and headed their way.

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I agree, and I stand beside you and the community in the fight! Money and politics seem to have become more important than the science, the people's well being, and what is right. The time for change is long overdue, and headed their way.

 

W. Somerset Maugham Quote

t_space.gif

"If a nation values anything more than freedom,

it will lose its freedom; and the irony of it is

that if it is comfort or money that it values more,

it will lose that, too."

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Nobody should be under the impression that Sativex is the answer. It's not. The authors of this research article are after something distinct and more significant: A hypothetical CBD analog that enhances the effects of CBD on Id-1 promoter suppression. With a goal of inhibiting invasion and metastasis and saving the lives of cancer patients.

 

While it's true that synthetic THC (Marinol) and THC/CBD (Sativex) exist as approved drugs in the US and UK, these represent the tip of the iceberg as far as the potential for drug design goes.

 

I've spoken several times with the GW folks.

 

There's a lot more they observed in their testing than they talk about. Much more.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Excellent Post. This is exactly what many of us have been saying all along; we NEED more research, many of the medicinal qualities of marihuana are in the CBDs. There are MANY studies out there. Here's another:

 

January 31, 2008 - Madison, WI, USA

 

Madison, WI: Cannabinoids inhibit cancer cell proliferation and should be clinically tested as chemotherapeutic agents, according to a review published in the January issue of the journal Cancer Research.

 

Investigators at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health reported that the administration of cannabinoids halts the spread of a wide range of cancers, including brain cancer, prostate cancer, breast cancer, lung cancer, skin cancer, pancreatic cancer, and lymphoma. Researchers suggested that cannabinoids may offer significant advantages over standard chemotherapy treatments because the compounds are both non-toxic and can uniquely target malignant cells while ignoring healthy ones.

 

"Cannabinoids … offer potential applications as anti-tumor drugs, based on the ability of some members of this class to limit inflammation, cell proliferation, and cell survival," authors concluded. "[T]here is overwhelming evidence to suggest that cannabinoids can be explored as chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of cancer."

 

In November, researchers at the California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute reported that the administration of the non-psychoactive cannabinoid cannabidiol limits the activity of the breast cancer metastasis gene Id-1, stating, "[Cannabidiol] offers hope of a non-toxic therapy that could [treat aggressive forms of cancer] without any of the painful side effects [of chemotherapy.]"

 

In 2006, investigators at Madrid's Complutense University, School of Biology, reported in the British Journal of Cancer that THC administration decreases recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (brain) tumor growth in patients diagnosed with the disease.

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Excellent Post. This is exactly what many of us have been saying all along; we NEED more research, many of the medicinal qualities of marihuana are in the CBDs. There are MANY studies out there. Here's another:

 

January 31, 2008 - Madison, WI, USA

 

Madison, WI: Cannabinoids inhibit cancer cell proliferation and should be clinically tested as chemotherapeutic agents, according to a review published in the January issue of the journal Cancer Research.

 

Investigators at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health reported that the administration of cannabinoids halts the spread of a wide range of cancers, including brain cancer, prostate cancer, breast cancer, lung cancer, skin cancer, pancreatic cancer, and lymphoma. Researchers suggested that cannabinoids may offer significant advantages over standard chemotherapy treatments because the compounds are both non-toxic and can uniquely target malignant cells while ignoring healthy ones.

 

"Cannabinoids … offer potential applications as anti-tumor drugs, based on the ability of some members of this class to limit inflammation, cell proliferation, and cell survival," authors concluded. "[T]here is overwhelming evidence to suggest that cannabinoids can be explored as chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of cancer."

 

In November, researchers at the California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute reported that the administration of the non-psychoactive cannabinoid cannabidiol limits the activity of the breast cancer metastasis gene Id-1, stating, "[Cannabidiol] offers hope of a non-toxic therapy that could [treat aggressive forms of cancer] without any of the painful side effects [of chemotherapy.]"

 

In 2006, investigators at Madrid's Complutense University, School of Biology, reported in the British Journal of Cancer that THC administration decreases recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (brain) tumor growth in patients diagnosed with the disease.

 

 

Thanks scooter,

More Research is definitely what we need :thumbsu: Thanks for posting the article you found in this thread and adding to it :goodjob:

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There's been a lot more research out there than we realize, as the feds like to suppress a lot! Eastern and Far Eastern scientific communities do far more, as they look to nature for answers moreso than Western scientists. Here are a couple more interesting studies:

 

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Amyotroph Lateral Scler Other Motor Neuron Disord. 2004 Mar;5(1):33-9.

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: delayed disease progression in mice by treatment with a cannabinoid.

 

Raman C, McAllister SD, Rizvi G, Patel SG, Moore DH, Abood ME.

 

Forbes Norris MDA/ALS Research Center, 2351 Clay Street, Suite 416, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, CA 94115, USA.

Abstract

 

Effective treatment for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) remains elusive. Two of the primary hypotheses underlying motor neuron vulnerability are susceptibility to excitotoxicity and oxidative damage. There is rapidly emerging evidence that the cannabinoid receptor system has the potential to reduce both excitotoxic and oxidative cell damage. Here we report that treatment with Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC) was effective if administered either before or after onset of signs in the ALS mouse model (hSOD(G93A) transgenic mice). Administration at the onset of tremors delayed motor impairment and prolonged survival in Delta(9)-THC treated mice when compared to vehicle controls. In addition, we present an improved method for the analysis of disease progression in the ALS mouse model. This logistic model provides an estimate of the age at which muscle endurance has declined by 50% with much greater accuracy than could be attained for any other measure of decline. In vitro, Delta(9)-THC was extremely effective at reducing oxidative damage in spinal cord cultures. Additionally, Delta(9)-THC is anti-excitotoxic in vitro. These cellular mechanisms may underlie the presumed neuroprotective effect in ALS. As Delta(9)-THC is well tolerated, it and other cannabinoids may prove to be novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of ALS.

 

PMID: 15204022 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

 

US Investigators Praise Cannabinoids As Chemo Treatment

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January 31, 2008 - Madison, WI, USA

 

Madison, WI: Cannabinoids inhibit cancer cell proliferation and should be clinically tested as chemotherapeutic agents, according to a review published in the January issue of the journal Cancer Research.

 

Investigators at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health reported that the administration of cannabinoids halts the spread of a wide range of cancers, including brain cancer, prostate cancer, breast cancer, lung cancer, skin cancer, pancreatic cancer, and lymphoma. Researchers suggested that cannabinoids may offer significant advantages over standard chemotherapy treatments because the compounds are both non-toxic and can uniquely target malignant cells while ignoring healthy ones.

 

"Cannabinoids … offer potential applications as anti-tumor drugs, based on the ability of some members of this class to limit inflammation, cell proliferation, and cell survival," authors concluded. "[T]here is overwhelming evidence to suggest that cannabinoids can be explored as chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of cancer."

 

In November, researchers at the California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute reported that the administration of the non-psychoactive cannabinoid cannabidiol limits the activity of the breast cancer metastasis gene Id-1, stating, "[Cannabidiol] offers hope of a non-toxic therapy that could [treat aggressive forms of cancer] without any of the painful side effects [of chemotherapy.]"

 

In 2006, investigators at Madrid's Complutense University, School of Biology, reported in the British Journal of Cancer that THC administration decreases recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (brain) tumor growth in patients diagnosed with the disease.

 

 

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

Mol Cancer Ther. 2010 Jan;9(1):180-9. Epub 2010 Jan 6.

Cannabidiol enhances the inhibitory effects of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol on human glioblastoma cell proliferation and survival.

 

Marcu JP, Christian RT, Lau D, Zielinski AJ, Horowitz MP, Lee J, Pakdel A, Allison J, Limbad C, Moore DH, Yount GL, Desprez PY, McAllister SD.

 

California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute, San Francisco, California 94107, USA.

Abstract

 

The cannabinoid 1 (CB(1)) and cannabinoid 2 (CB(2)) receptor agonist Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) has been shown to be a broad-range inhibitor of cancer in culture and in vivo, and is currently being used in a clinical trial for the treatment of glioblastoma. It has been suggested that other plant-derived cannabinoids, which do not interact efficiently with CB(1) and CB(2) receptors, can modulate the actions of Delta(9)-THC. There are conflicting reports, however, as to what extent other cannabinoids can modulate Delta(9)-THC activity, and most importantly, it is not clear whether other cannabinoid compounds can either potentiate or inhibit the actions of Delta(9)-THC. We therefore tested cannabidiol, the second most abundant plant-derived cannabinoid, in combination with Delta(9)-THC. In the U251 and SF126 glioblastoma cell lines, Delta(9)-THC and cannabidiol acted synergistically to inhibit cell proliferation. The treatment of glioblastoma cells with both compounds led to significant modulations of the cell cycle and induction of reactive oxygen species and apoptosis as well as specific modulations of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and caspase activities. These specific changes were not observed with either compound individually, indicating that the signal transduction pathways affected by the combination treatment were unique. Our results suggest that the addition of cannabidiol to Delta(9)-THC may improve the overall effectiveness of Delta(9)-THC in the treatment of glioblastoma in cancer patients.

 

PMID: 20053780 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]PMCID: PMC2806496 [Available on 2011/1/6]

 

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Marijuana Use Associated With Higher Functioning In Schizophrenics, Study Says

 

Manhasset, NY: Schizophrenic patients with a history of cannabis use demonstrate higher levels of cognitive performance compared to patients who have never used the drug, according to clinical trial data published online in the journal Schizophrenia Research.

 

Investigators at the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, the Zucker Hillside Hospital in New York, the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and Princeton University compared the neurocognitive skills of 175 schizophrenics with a history of cannabis use with 280 subjects with no history of illegal drug use.

 

Researchers reported that cannabis users demonstrated "significantly better performance" compared to nonusers on measures of processing speed, verbal fluency, verbal learning, and memory. Marijuana use was also associated with better over all GAF (Global Assessment of Functioning) scores.

 

Authors wrote: "The results of the present analysis suggest that [cannabis use] in patients with SZ (schizophrenia) is associated with better performance on measures of processing speed and verbal skills. These data are consistent with prior reports indicating that SZ patients with a history of CUD (cannabis use disorders) have less severe cognitive deficits than SZ patients without comorbid CUD. ... The present findings also suggest that CUD in patients with SZ may not differentially affect the severity of illness as measured by clinical symptomatology."

 

Researchers speculated that the observed differences in patients' cognitive functioning may be because subjects who use cannabis are more likely to "competently engage in social interaction" than nonusers.

 

"[T]he present findings suggest that SZ patients with comorbid CUD may represent a higher functioning subgroup of SZ," investigators concluded. "Future large-scale, prospective studies are needed to elucidate the nature of this relationship."

 

 

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It's sad that we, as caregivers and patients, are for the most part the cutting edge of research. The need for us to document and correlate our findings can only help our cause. I ask my patients to have their doctors be very specific in regards to how marihuana helps them, on their recommendations and in their patient records. We should start a database of information here on the site regarding disease, symptoms, and marihuanas effects on them. No need for names of anyone, just a simple anonymous questionnaire patients could fill out, giving as much detail regarding their disease and the help marihuana may or may not provide.

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It's sad that we, as caregivers and patients, are for the most part the cutting edge of research. The need for us to document and correlate our findings can only help our cause. I ask my patients to have their doctors be very specific in regards to how marihuana helps them, on their recommendations and in their patient records. We should start a database of information here on the site regarding disease, symptoms, and marihuanas effects on them. No need for names of anyone, just a simple anonymous questionnaire patients could fill out, giving as much detail regarding their disease and the help marihuana may or may not provide.

 

 

Thank you so much for re-posting these research articles. I like your idea a lot! :goodjob: A thread maybe dedicated to MM and different conditions , that would be a great reference, also include which strain works best for their condition. That would help a lot of people.

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I'm always searching the web for supporting documentation regarding MM. I also take the devils advocate and read reports that are contrary, but the funny thing is they are few and far between. The biggest arguement against MM use is based on ingestion form; i.e. "smoking" is bad. Of course it is, ingesting ANY combusted material is bad lol! FIRE BAD, ARRGH! I advise all of my patients to ingest via food, tincture, gel cap, etc. Even vaporizers can cause health issues; many unwanted chemicals are vaporised during the process. And Marinol, along with it's counterparts, does not have the medicinal qualities of good old nature made marihuana. Western science just doesn't get it, it's not just one or two things in MM, it's the sum of its parts.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I'm always searching the web for supporting documentation regarding MM. I also take the devils advocate and read reports that are contrary

 

I do the same. If you have not read the book Marijuana and Medicine:Assessing the Science Base you should, some of the best and most extensive research done as of yet.

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I have been trying to get anyone at EMU on board with helping with just such an effort and so far all I have received for my efforts is ostracism. I was told last week that I should not bother to apply for post grad at EMU. 6 months ago I was invited to do it and told there was a good chance of work and/or tuition waiver as well. Then I spoke up and said the dreaded words....Medical Cannabis Research.

EMU is a diploma mill and a joke all rolled into one. I cannot believe the low academic standards or the lax administration

They froze tuition due to Declining enrollment. One of the only schools to experience declining enrollment.

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