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Caregiver Questions Needing Answers


Jennifer8
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Hello To Anyone Out There,

 

I am someone who has taken it upon herself to go beyond knowing about this, "ACT", known as the Michigan Medical MariHuana Act, referred to hereafter as MMMA, and genuinely scour laws within the state of Michigan, that contradict the highest laws of our land, which is the Constitution, or, rather, Constitutional law. (Not that this is a question, but what is the deal with substituting the "j" in the word marijuana with the letter "h"?

 

I have some very good questions and since they are GOOD questions, I'm going to keep them together in this post, because maybe some day a lurker will find this post and say, "FINALLY!! Someone else has asked the very same questions that I have been wondering about, or at this time should wonder about, to uphold the law and be what would be the "perfect" image of what a caregiver is supposed to be.

 

To the attorney(s), if you are out there, please help me understand some things. Keep in mind, and this is for REALS, I don't smoke pot, be it legally or illegally, but I have nothing against those who do allegedly in any recreational or legal medicinal way. I do, however, want to learn more about this entire mariJuana movement in Michigan and maybe, JUST maybe, this movement, if you will, can bring the state of Michigan out of the sh*tter and armpit of the universe.

 

 

1.I have a qualified patient listing me as their caregiver. However, they are currently waiting for their card to be issued to them from the state of Michigan. When can the caregiver start growing the plants to provide for the patient? (I have since discovered, and correct me if I am wrong, but the caregiver can ONLY start growing when, and ONLY WHEN, they get their card from the state showing they are a legal caretaker.)

 

Now, let's say the legally recognized patient has DELAY with the state in receiving their card. From what I understand, they can show their check or payment copy to "the invisible supplier" or a dispensary any form of law enforcement always has staked out, which is allegedly fine if all is legal, but does that same unclear and ambiguous law leaving a person semi-close to prosecution protect a patient in that circumstance? Whatever the answer is with this part of question no. 1, what about the soon to be legally recognized caregiver in this situation. It seems to leave room for the caregiver to not be legally considered a caregiver, IN SPITE of the same allowance that is given to the soon to be recognized patient in this very same circumstance.

 

2.What are the Michigan laws on seed inventory, per caregiver? Can a person maintain seeds of proven effectiveness and well-liked plants, even though the caregiver is not growing more than the allowed growing regulated plant count?

 

3.How are caregivers supposed to get in touch with other caregivers, aside from compassion groups?

 

4.What are the Michigan laws on exactly where a caregiver can grow their patient MMMP marijuana plants, not breaking the laws with quantity of plants per patient(s). For example, maybe I don't want to grow my plants in my dwelling. I make a legitimate rental transaction, or contract, with a friend of mine. My friend lives in a spacious house on a 1 acre lot. I have rented out a terrific part of my friend's basement. There is a perfect set up in a room, with a lock, for me to come over various days of the week to tend to the plants. I pay my friend $5.00 or even $1.00, per month and/or MAYBE $20.00, per month to pay for electrical use. Let's also say that not my friend, or anyone else except for myself, has the key or goes into the special room that grows medical marijuana for the legally recognized patient I am a legally recognized caregiver to? It's my space, I've legitimately rented out the room. Privacy is respected. Nobody touches anything, etc. Am I or my friend violating the law? All my friend did was rent out a portion of his/her basement or allows me to use his/her basement and I pay him/her x amount of dollars a month for extra electrical use, nothing more. It's a super simple contract, in that respect. I have rented out space for me to run my legally authorized business.

 

5.How are caregivers legally allowed to accept payment for patients who purchase MMMP plants from authorized caregivers? I realize nobody is ever paying for pot, so to speak. That is understandable, and that is against the law. However, how about paying the expense for any supplies needed, from lights, the inexpensive or costly hydroponic set-up gadgets, and for seeds and/or plants used to begin the process. For a legit caregiver helping maybe a cancer patient, or something else that incapacitates a patient, other then that chronic knee, back, or rotators cup injury. I would think payment is for the overall care a patient gives, to include helping with laundry, cooking, cleaning, etc. So, having written that, is it perfectly acceptable and recognized as completely legal to submit an invoice, INVOICE, of a detailed nature, even going so far as to add the med marijuana products and supplies, not exclusively, but in addition to the other items for the legally recognized patient?

 

6.Can an authorized caregiver purchase an MMMP plant or plants from any source? HYPOTHETICALLY SPEAKING, as to be clear for those ever eager federal or state law enforcement officials reading this, is it ILLEGAL or LEGAL for a LEGALLY recognized caregiver, OR PATIENT, to purchase marijuana for use of legit med marj since the law does not allow anyone to purchase any form of marijuana, FORCING one to have to at least THINK that is their only or practical option? Is the legal and legit patient or legally recognized caregiver contributing to a crime or are they covered? Is the legally recognized patient or the legally recognized caregiver protected but the unlicensed distributor held legally accountable? Further, and I want this part answered as well, but if not one single penny is spent, and not one single anything is given in lieu of anything monitary, as to make sure there is no form of purchasing, whatsoever, not even to trade a few plants for a case of Mt. Dew, from an unlicensed person who happens to have a couple of starter plants and some seeds that perhaps he or she seemed to somehow find or come across, is there a misdemeanor crime, or no criminal activity taking place. For all I know it was found on the curb and discovered to be that rascal of a plant known as cannabis. So, as the current ambiguous law stands, leaving many open ends, can someone answer this question, and its various scenarios, with confidence?

 

7.How many seeds, NOT PLANTS, can a qualified caregiver legally purchase, OR SIMPLY HAVE FREE AND CLEAR without any form of purchase, from another legally recognized caregiver or patient? If both are legally recognized, and allegedly protected under this ACT, then why is anyone punished for simply giving, if that? Why can't legally recognized patients and legally recognized caregivers at least GIVE to one another, free and clear, the core important products needed, since any other way is illegal other than "dispensaries" simply share and help one another, even if it is to regulate, at this time, how much can be shared between legit card holders? I am still trying to understand the dispensary set-up and have yet to be able to find laws on said facility, but will eventually start looking into that type of facility. If a legal legit caregiver, and/or patient, have grown more than he/she is allowed, instead of somehow making the excess mysteriously vanish rather than burning it, why not recycle it to another trying to get started to help their self or another legally legit cardholder?

 

8.If I grow and cultivate MMMP plants, as a qualified caregiver, am I protected if I somehow show a positive testing for a drug test? Assuming it was not illegally consumed? (Will the residue or THC get absorbed in my skin while handling the MMMP authorized plants through time?

 

9.As a qualified caregiver, legally abiding by the laws of Michigan, am I protected from discrimination? If not, why not? I figure if the job did not yet have a policy on such then I would be ok as long as I was not caught using on the job, assuming I am a legally recognized patient?

 

10.As a legally licensed caregiver, can I legally purchase seeds from outside of the state of Michigan AND from outside of the United States from a country where such a purchase would be legal?

 

11.As a licensed MMMP caregiver, can I legally purchase paraphernalia? Hell, I can walk into a various gas station and find marijuana accessories yet some people get arrested for "contraband". What's the difference between contraband and paraphernalia?

 

12.As a licensed MMMP caregiver, can I legally acquire seeds? Are marjiuna seeds, and ONLY seeds, illegal to have, with or without being a legitimate cardholder? What if I am a legally recognized card holder and have no plants but I have a collection of different seeds sealed in bags in my freezer because I want to experiment with different types of med marijuana plants. Maybe one time I want to grow something called Northern Light one season, but down the road I may want to see how White Widow turns out. Maybe next season I want to grow 6 plants called Wonder Woman and another 6 plants called California Dream. My point on this whole question is what are the deal with seeds? Is it illegal for a legit card holder to have a large organized seed collection in my freezer for a plant growers own use, be it down-the-road?

 

13.In compliance with the MMMP Act, when referring to a licensed qualifying patient not having more than 2.5 oz, is that in one day? One hour? One week? One month? What, specifically, is that "no more 2.5 oz" blurb in the Act about?If it doesn't state it, how can one not be sure?

 

Ok, I had a few more questions but this made my head hurt and started aggravating me because some of this "Act" seems set up so that people get busted trying to be legit.

 

Thank you to those of you, if there are any, who take on these questions.

 

In closing, it would seem like there is case law that could be used, be it state or federal, to show how some of the MMMA set-up is causing people to HAVE to break the law. It will all have to wait until more specifics or detail are added to the Act, or until too many poor saps get part of their life ruined for getting arrested in a non violent crime and non damaging crime, losing their job, going bankrupt from legal fees and probation costs, no longer allowed to get government loans or grants to help pay for college, etc, before something gets clarified.

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wow, what an intelligent post. im afraid alot of ur questions are questions that many of us have, and some we will not know the answers to until test cases are decided in the appelate stage or the supreme court. in the meantime, alot of people are suffering unnecessarily.

 

i have read other posts/opinions on the law iyself, and it seems many believe it was actually very finely crafted document, with its strateguc ambiguity to allow for individual interpretation. not sure i agree with that in my own particular situation, but whatev. makes for some great debate tho.

 

btw welcome jennifer8! :)

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any person aiding in the patients use of medical marijuana is not subject to prosecution. i believe the affirmative defense law would come into play there. maybe im wrong. staff help me ou on this one.

 

 

I just get frustrated, probably like many of you, thinking some poor person will suffer trying to be helpful. Usually law enforcement will pick on who they think can't afford a good attorney, for petty related offenses. Even with a court-appointed attorney, heaven help the poor person unless you get that awesome one in a million court appointed who will take the time to go the extra mile for pennies on the dollar. Some do, some don't. Then, if some poor guy or gal gets busted, they may not be able to keep or acquire a card rightfully due to that person, for nuthin', basically.

 

(I just figured out how to use that edit button...bear with me and thank you for being patient with me.)

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wow, what an intelligent post. im afraid alot of ur questions are questions that many of us have, and some we will not know the answers to until test cases are decided in the appelate stage or the supreme court. in the meantime, alot of people are suffering unnecessarily.

 

i have read other posts/opinions on the law iyself, and it seems many believe it was actually very finely crafted document, with its strateguc ambiguity to allow for individual interpretation. not sure i agree with that in my own particular situation, but whatev. makes for some great debate tho.

 

btw welcome jennifer8! :)

 

 

Thank you, Christinax4. I will agree that it was an intelligently written Act. I only worry about those who will get needless legal troubles not deserving of it for gray areas left undefined.

 

This whole marijuana Act could lead to something that brings Michigan out of a horrific financial condition. I am thinking about this as growth in business. So many lost jobs, so many lost homes, so many have lost so much and jobs are hard to find other than part time this and part time that. Unless everyone is a medical professional, lawyer, engineer, etc, per se, and due to the high blue collar jobs the state has been known for, there are so many who cannot perform a heart transplant, but they might be very intelligent about making marijuana development into a thriving business, other than being a major drug trafficker. However, looking at it from the non-drug-trafficker business end of it, so much could come of it.

 

Also, thank you all for a quick response. I was impressed and it was appreciated.

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any person aiding in the patients use of medical marijuana is not subject to prosecution. i believe the affirmative defense law would come into play there. maybe im wrong. staff help me ou on this one.

 

You gave an interesting reply...."anyone aiding a patients use of med marij...." That would mean one was growing it to aid a person in their use. That might mean troubles. Before anyone assumes it, is any clarification needed? You did make a really good point.

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One bit of advice; avoid being in the posiion of using the AD! I was forced to, and it costs. A lot. Many of your questions are in the grey area of the law; genetic acqusition is not covered. As to payments, they are to be "for services rendered", as if that would cover everything. Very good post, and many of your questions have been addressed in the older content. Not that any resolutions were reached, but they may help you out some.

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Evening Jennifer,

 

I am not a lawyer but would love to take a stab at a few of the things you bring up and ask. If I am wrong, I am sure somebody will be along to correct me, and I would welcome that.

 

First one, the spelling of marihuana in the law. Marihuana is actually the most widely used spelling of the word worldwide, including different languages, and is from the Spanish marihuana. However both spellings with the "h" and the "j" are correct. It is also the way it has been used in legalese for a very long time.

 

As to the when a caregiver can begin... the lawyers I have heard talk about the issue say that the same 20 days applies, as the paperwork is proof of your registration.

 

The question about seeds is one that can go either way, the only place in the law that speaks of seeds states "any incidental amount of seeds". Are they going to read that to mean "a byproduct of" or "not specified". As far as I know there are no penalties for the number of seeds one posesses (either in federal or state law), perhaps they would be treated as paraphenalia by the feds.

 

There is no limit on how many times a day, week, or month a patient can have 2.5 oz. The only real limit on totals is "a quantity of marihuana that was not more than was reasonably necessary to ensure the uninterrupted availability of marihuana for the purpose of treating or alleviating the patient's serious or debilitating medical condition or symptoms of the patient's serious or debilitating medical condition".

 

I will leave the others for those that are more familiar with the nuances of the law.

 

Hope that helps a bit.

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Hello To Anyone Out There,

 

I am someone who has taken it upon herself to go beyond knowing about this, "ACT", known as the Michigan Medical MariHuana Act, referred to hereafter as MMMA, and genuinely scour laws within the state of Michigan, that contradict the highest laws of our land, which is the Constitution, or, rather, Constitutional law. (Not that this is a question, but what is the deal with substituting the "j" in the word marijuana with the letter "h"? That's just stupid, but, whatever. There has to be a great story somewhere about the changing of the spelling because surely people involved with writing this Act would not be icky puritanical morons believing it won't be confused with the other dirty dope word known as mariJuana, but, whatever.

 

I have some very good questions and since they are GOOD questions, I'm going to keep them together in this post, because maybe some day a lurker will find this post and say, "FINALLY!! Someone else has asked the very same questions that I have been wondering about, or at this time should wonder about, to uphold the law and be what would be the "perfect" image of what a caregiver is supposed to be.

 

To the attorney(s), if you are out there, please help me understand some things. Keep in mind, and this is for REALS, I don't smoke pot, be it legally or illegally, but I have nothing against those who do allegedly in any recreational or legal medicinal way. I do, however, want to learn more about this entire mariJuana movement in Michigan and maybe, JUST maybe, this movement, if you will, can bring the state of Michigan out of the sh*tter and armpit of the universe.

 

 

1.I have a qualified patient listing me as their caregiver. However, they are currently waiting for their card to be issued to them from the state of Michigan. When can the caregiver start growing the plants to provide for the patient? (I have since discovered, and correct me if I am wrong, but the caregiver can ONLY start growing when, and ONLY WHEN, they get their card from the state showing they are a legal caretaker.)

 

Now, let's say the legally recognized patient has DELAY with the state in receiving their card. From what I understand, they can show their check or payment copy to "the invisible supplier" or a dispensary any form of law enforcement always has staked out, which is allegedly fine if all is legal, but does that same unclear and ambiguous law leaving a person semi-close to prosecution protect a patient in that circumstance? Whatever the answer is with this part of question no. 1, what about the soon to be legally recognized caregiver in this situation. It seems to leave room for the caregiver to not be legally considered a caregiver, IN SPITE of the same allowance that is given to the soon to be recognized patient in this very same circumstance.

 

2.What are the Michigan laws on seed inventory, per caregiver? Can a person maintain seeds of proven effectiveness and well-liked plants, even though the caregiver is not growing more than the allowed growing regulated plant count?

 

3.How are caregivers supposed to get in touch with other caregivers, aside from compassion groups?

 

4.What are the Michigan laws on exactly where a caregiver can grow their patient MMMP marijuana plants, not breaking the laws with quantity of plants per patient(s). For example, maybe I don't want to grow my plants in my dwelling. I make a legitimate rental transaction, or contract, with a friend of mine. My friend lives in a spacious house on a 1 acre lot. I have rented out a terrific part of my friend's basement. There is a perfect set up in a room, with a lock, for me to come over various days of the week to tend to the plants. I pay my friend $5.00 or even $1.00, per month and/or MAYBE $20.00, per month to pay for electrical use. Let's also say that not my friend, or anyone else except for myself, has the key or goes into the special room that grows medical marijuana for the legally recognized patient I am a legally recognized caregiver to? It's my space, I've legitimately rented out the room. Privacy is respected. Nobody touches anything, etc. Am I or my friend violating the law? All my friend did was rent out a portion of his/her basement or allows me to use his/her basement and I pay him/her x amount of dollars a month for extra electrical use, nothing more. It's a super simple contract, in that respect. I have rented out space for me to run my legally authorized business.

 

5.How are caregivers legally allowed to accept payment for patients who purchase MMMP plants from authorized caregivers? I realize nobody is ever paying for pot, so to speak. That is understandable, and that is against the law. However, how about paying the expense for any supplies needed, from lights, the inexpensive or costly hydroponic set-up gadgets, and for seeds and/or plants used to begin the process. For a legit caregiver helping maybe a cancer patient, or something else that incapacitates a patient, other then that chronic knee, back, or rotators cup injury. I would think payment is for the overall care a patient gives, to include helping with laundry, cooking, cleaning, etc. So, having written that, is it perfectly acceptable and recognized as completely legal to submit an invoice, INVOICE, of a detailed nature, even going so far as to add the med marijuana products and supplies, not exclusively, but in addition to the other items for the legally recognized patient?

 

6.Can an authorized caregiver purchase an MMMP plant or plants from any source? HYPOTHETICALLY SPEAKING, as to be clear for those ever eager federal or state law enforcement officials reading this, is it ILLEGAL or LEGAL for a LEGALLY recognized caregiver, OR PATIENT, to purchase marijuana for use of legit med marj since the law does not allow anyone to purchase any form of marijuana, FORCING one to have to at least THINK that is their only or practical option? Is the legal and legit patient or legally recognized caregiver contributing to a crime or are they covered? Is the legally recognized patient or the legally recognized caregiver protected but the unlicensed distributor held legally accountable? Further, and I want this part answered as well, but if not one single penny is spent, and not one single anything is given in lieu of anything monitary, as to make sure there is no form of purchasing, whatsoever, not even to trade a few plants for a case of Mt. Dew, from an unlicensed person who happens to have a couple of starter plants and some seeds that perhaps he or she seemed to somehow find or come across, is there a misdemeanor crime, or no criminal activity taking place. For all I know it was found on the curb and discovered to be that rascal of a plant known as cannabis. So, as the current ambiguous law stands, leaving many open ends, can someone answer this question, and its various scenarios, with confidence?

 

7.How many seeds, NOT PLANTS, can a qualified caregiver legally purchase, OR SIMPLY HAVE FREE AND CLEAR without any form of purchase, from another legally recognized caregiver or patient? If both are legally recognized, and allegedly protected under this ACT, then why is anyone punished for simply giving, if that? Why can't legally recognized patients and legally recognized caregivers at least GIVE to one another, free and clear, the core important products needed, since any other way is illegal other than "dispensaries" simply share and help one another, even if it is to regulate, at this time, how much can be shared between legit card holders? I am still trying to understand the dispensary set-up and have yet to be able to find laws on said facility, but will eventually start looking into that type of facility. If a legal legit caregiver, and/or patient, have grown more than he/she is allowed, instead of somehow making the excess mysteriously vanish rather than burning it, why not recycle it to another trying to get started to help their self or another legally legit cardholder?

 

8.If I grow and cultivate MMMP plants, as a qualified caregiver, am I protected if I somehow show a positive testing for a drug test? Assuming it was not illegally consumed? (Will the residue or THC get absorbed in my skin while handling the MMMP authorized plants through time?

 

9.As a qualified caregiver, legally abiding by the laws of Michigan, am I protected from discrimination? If not, why not? I figure if the job did not yet have a policy on such then I would be ok as long as I was not caught using on the job, assuming I am a legally recognized patient?

 

10.As a legally licensed caregiver, can I legally purchase seeds from outside of the state of Michigan AND from outside of the United States from a country where such a purchase would be legal?

 

11.As a licensed MMMP caregiver, can I legally purchase paraphernalia? Hell, I can walk into a various gas station and find marijuana accessories yet some people get arrested for "contraband". What's the difference between contraband and paraphernalia?

 

12.As a licensed MMMP caregiver, can I legally acquire seeds? Are marjiuna seeds, and ONLY seeds, illegal to have, with or without being a legitimate cardholder? What if I am a legally recognized card holder and have no plants but I have a collection of different seeds sealed in bags in my freezer because I want to experiment with different types of med marijuana plants. Maybe one time I want to grow something called Northern Light one season, but down the road I may want to see how White Widow turns out. Maybe next season I want to grow 6 plants called Wonder Woman and another 6 plants called California Dream. My point on this whole question is what are the deal with seeds? Is it illegal for a legit card holder to have a large organized seed collection in my freezer for a plant growers own use, be it down-the-road?

 

13.In compliance with the MMMP Act, when referring to a licensed qualifying patient not having more than 2.5 oz, is that in one day? One hour? One week? One month? What, specifically, is that "no more 2.5 oz" blurb in the Act about?If it doesn't state it, how can one not be sure?

 

Ok, I had a few more questions but this made my head hurt and started aggravating me because some of this "Act" seems set up so that people get busted trying to be legit.

 

Thank you to those of you, if there are any, who take on these questions.

 

In closing, it would seem like there is case law that could be used, be it state or federal, to show how some of the MMMA set-up is causing people HAVE to break the law without further explanation. It will all have to wait until more specifics or detail are added to the Act, or until too many poor saps get part of their life ruined for getting arrested in a non violent crime and non damaging crime, losing their job, going bankrupt from legal fees and probation costs, no longer allowed to get government loans or grants to help pay for college, etc, before something gets clarified.

 

Disclaimer...I'm not a lawyer, but have spoken to many of them

 

Ok here goes:

 

1: 20 days after application check is cashed by the state of MI

2: You may possess as many seeds as you'd like. Seeds are considered "incidental" according to the act.

3: Good old fashioned networking, this website and others like it

4: As long as your grow is in an enclosed, locked facility (not further defined by law) accessible only by patient and caregiver, there are no other restrictions. Rental properties, rental rooms, greenhouses, inside a hollowed out cave...all fine as long as it is enclosed and locked

5: There are many different ways of doing this. Some charge per ounce produced, almost in a commission based system. Others charge service fees for time/equipment/space. Still others charge a flat rate "plant-sitting" fee.

6: Patients and registered caregivers are legally protected in acquiring meds and plants from any source. The person providing the medicine may or may not be protected, however. This is still widely debated not only here, but amongst courts and LEO. We'll need to wait for case law for a definitive answer on that.

7: Again, seeds are considered incidental and you may possess as many as you want/need.

8: As a caregiver, you are authorized top assist in the patient's use of medical marijuana. The definition of "Use" includes internal possession. For example, some MM patients may not be able to ingest the medicine fully themselves, and need the medicine to be blown into their face (shotgun.) Also, to adequately serve your patients, you had better know what you are providing them. How can you accurately do this without testing it?

9: Tough question. Employers are under no obligation to accomodate you, as this is a right-to-work state. This will vary depending on the situation and how you define "discrimination." Any agency/person that receives federal monies (such as a section 8 housing company) is answerable to federal law, and therefore have a strong case for not accommodating MM.

10: No! Importing anything from out of country puts you firmly in federal jurisdiction. Using the postal service also puts you square in federal jurisdiction. Of course marijuana is 100% illegal in all of its forms according to the federal government

11: Paraphernalia is specifically protected in the medical marijuana act

12: Marijuana seeds are still illegal for non patients and caregivers. See my above points for more on seeds.

13: As long as a patient or caregiver isn't in possession of more than 2.5 ounces at any one time, they are protected. If you need 2.5 ounces a day, fine. 2.5 per week, fine. Also note the provision in the act for maintaining a quantity not to exceed that which is reasonably necessary to provide an uninterrupted supply of medicine. This could easily be more than 2.5 ounces in many cases.

 

Hope that helps

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Disclaimer...I'm not a lawyer, but have spoken to many of them

 

Ok here goes:

 

1: 20 days after application check is cashed by the state of MI

2: You may possess as many seeds as you'd like. Seeds are considered "incidental" according to the act.

3: Good old fashioned networking, this website and others like it

4: As long as your grow is in an enclosed, locked facility (not further defined by law) accessible only by patient and caregiver, there are no other restrictions. Rental properties, rental rooms, greenhouses, inside a hollowed out cave...all fine as long as it is enclosed and locked

5: There are many different ways of doing this. Some charge per ounce produced, almost in a commission based system. Others charge service fees for time/equipment/space. Still others charge a flat rate "plant-sitting" fee.

6: Patients and registered caregivers are legally protected in acquiring meds and plants from any source. The person providing the medicine may or may not be protected, however. This is still widely debated not only here, but amongst courts and LEO. We'll need to wait for case law for a definitive answer on that.

7: Again, seeds are considered incidental and you may possess as many as you want/need.

8: As a caregiver, you are authorized top assist in the patient's use of medical marijuana. The definition of "Use" includes internal possession. For example, some MM patients may not be able to ingest the medicine fully themselves, and need the medicine to be blown into their face (shotgun.) Also, to adequately serve your patients, you had better know what you are providing them. How can you accurately do this without testing it?

9: Tough question. Employers are under no obligation to accomodate you, as this is a right-to-work state. This will vary depending on the situation and how you define "discrimination." Any agency/person that receives federal monies (such as a section 8 housing company) is answerable to federal law, and therefore have a strong case for not accommodating MM.

10: No! Importing anything from out of country puts you firmly in federal jurisdiction. Using the postal service also puts you square in federal jurisdiction. Of course marijuana is 100% illegal in all of its forms according to the federal government

11: Paraphernalia is specifically protected in the medical marijuana act

12: Marijuana seeds are still illegal for non patients and caregivers. See my above points for more on seeds.

13: As long as a patient or caregiver isn't in possession of more than 2.5 ounces at any one time, they are protected. If you need 2.5 ounces a day, fine. 2.5 per week, fine. Also note the provision in the act for maintaining a quantity not to exceed that which is reasonably necessary to provide an uninterrupted supply of medicine. This could easily be more than 2.5 ounces in many cases.

 

Hope that helps

 

 

Wow! That was yet another great reply, and I thank you for the time you took to patiently answer them. While the water is getting clearer, it is only slightly murky instead of muddy.

 

Again, thank you all for your assistance and thoughts.

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