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http://www.macombdaily.com/articles/2010/11/01/news/srv0000009831829.txt#blogcomments

 

 

Medical marijuana law vague

Published: Monday, November 01, 2010

 

By Carol Hopkins

For The Macomb Daily

 

In Michigan's ongoing medical marijuana debate, many people in law enforcement — who complain the act doesn't provide them with specifics — point out Lansing legislators should provide badly needed clarifications.

 

A survey of Oakland County legislators shows they agree, but they don't have an immediate plan of action.

 

Michigan voters approved medical marijuana by 63 percent in November 2008.

 

State Rep. Chuck Moss, R-Birmingham, noted voters said medical marijuana will be legal "but beyond that, they didn't say a whole lot.''

 

Moss said that while it's legal to have medical marijuana, there is "no framework for doing it.''

 

"It's like saying everyone can drive a car, but for example, do I need headlights?''

 

Moss said if marijuana is a medicine, it has to be regulated.

 

"You should know who you are buying it from,'' he said. "Is the dosage right, is the quality right? You can't say, 'Here is aspirin I made in my basement.' What is the protection for the patient?''

 

Moss said the state is going to have to look at existing medical marijuana laws. "'It doesn't look like California has done a good job,'' he said.

 

Moss wasn't sure when the 2011 Legislature might take up any changes to the law.

 

"I don't know who will be in charge,'' he said. "We should do something.''

 

Both supporters of medical marijuana and law enforcement have lobbied legislators, Moss said.

 

"Law enforcement has said, 'You put us in an impossible situation,' '' Moss said.

 

He looked ahead to next year.

 

"We're going to have a lot to do in the next session with a new governor. We'll be thinking about the tax code, regulations and red tape, the size and cost of government. Medical marijuana? Maybe that, too."

 

On the question of medical marijuana regulations, state Rep. Vicki Barnett, D-Farmington Hills, said, "Something needs to happen.''

 

"The act was very broad. It was overwhelmingly supported. There is a lack of implementation laws causing conflict between state and federal (enforcement). Local officials have talked (to legislators) and asked what are their obligations, what are they allowed and prevented from doing? It's very vague.''

 

Barnett said officials in units of government "don't know what they are required to do and a lot have put in moratoriums. There is a need to clarify the implementation of the act. "I doubt it will happen this year, but I hope it will happen soon. It's not good to keep people in limbo.''

 

State Sen. Gilda Jacobs, D-Huntington Woods, said of the law, "Clearly the enforcement part of this was not addressed well in what passed.''

 

On Aug. 25, 16 Oakland County people were arrested in drug raids by a narcotics enforcement team. The arrested people said they were following the letter of the law. Law enforcement officials said there were complaints about the dispensaries, and that people were selling marijuana to customers who were not patients.

 

Jacobs was aware of the raid, but "I don't think the raids were necessary to make the point the law should be changed.'' She said she believes the ballot proposal was "sold to the public that if someone suffering from a disease could get pain relief, this would be a humane way under a doctor's supervision to alleviate pain and suffering,'' she said. "Voters felt some emotional connection.''

 

She believes there is confusion about medical marijuana.

 

"This law is unclear and I believe the Legislature should take a look at it,'' she said. "But I doubt very much it will be taken up by in the lame duck session.''

 

State Rep. Ellen Cogen Lipton, D-Huntington Woods, said she has received complaints about medical marijuana from city officials in her district.

 

"The law needs to be reviewed and the ambiguities addressed,'' she said. "That would happen the first part of next session (in 2011).''

 

State Rep. Marty Knollenberg, R-Troy, called the medical marijuana law a "poorly crafted initiative'' with "too many loopholes.''

 

Knollenberg is sponsoring a bill that says any caregiver who has been convicted of a felony could not be a caregiver.

 

He called what is happening in Michigan now a "Wild West situation with so many trying to get into the business.''

 

Knollenberg calls for a study group with all parties involved to clarify the law.

 

"After that, you'll see medical marijuana be dispensed in some way,'' he said, noting that voters said they wanted this to be an alternative method of pain relief.

 

"We just need to tighten up the regulations,'' he said.

 

Knollenberg doesn't believe any change will occur this year. "Proponents of medical marijuana should be open to that,'' he said.''At the end of the day, they're going to have something. The more they scream, though, they may end up with nothing at all."

 

 

 

 

 

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"We just need to tighten up the regulations,'' he said.

 

Knollenberg doesn't believe any change will occur this year. "Proponents of medical marijuana should be open to that,'' he said.''At the end of the day, they're going to have something. The more they scream, though, they may end up with nothing at all."

 

that last sentence says it all

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http://www.macombdai...xt#blogcomments

 

 

Medical marijuana law vague

Published: Monday, November 01, 2010

 

By Carol Hopkins

For The Macomb Daily

 

In Michigan's ongoing medical marijuana debate, many people in law enforcement — who complain the act doesn't provide them with specifics — point out Lansing legislators should provide badly needed clarifications.

 

A survey of Oakland County legislators shows they agree, but they don't have an immediate plan of action.

 

Michigan voters approved medical marijuana by 63 percent in November 2008.

 

State Rep. Chuck Moss, R-Birmingham, noted voters said medical marijuana will be legal "but beyond that, they didn't say a whole lot.''

 

Moss said that while it's legal to have medical marijuana, there is "no framework for doing it.''

 

"It's like saying everyone can drive a car, but for example, do I need headlights?''

 

Moss said if marijuana is a medicine, it has to be regulated.

 

"You should know who you are buying it from,'' he said. "Is the dosage right, is the quality right? You can't say, 'Here is aspirin I made in my basement.' What is the protection for the patient?''

 

Moss said the state is going to have to look at existing medical marijuana laws. "'It doesn't look like California has done a good job,'' he said.

 

Moss wasn't sure when the 2011 Legislature might take up any changes to the law.

 

"I don't know who will be in charge,'' he said. "We should do something.''

 

Both supporters of medical marijuana and law enforcement have lobbied legislators, Moss said.

 

"Law enforcement has said, 'You put us in an impossible situation,' '' Moss said.

 

He looked ahead to next year.

 

"We're going to have a lot to do in the next session with a new governor. We'll be thinking about the tax code, regulations and red tape, the size and cost of government. Medical marijuana? Maybe that, too."

 

On the question of medical marijuana regulations, state Rep. Vicki Barnett, D-Farmington Hills, said, "Something needs to happen.''

 

"The act was very broad. It was overwhelmingly supported. There is a lack of implementation laws causing conflict between state and federal (enforcement). Local officials have talked (to legislators) and asked what are their obligations, what are they allowed and prevented from doing? It's very vague.''

 

Barnett said officials in units of government "don't know what they are required to do and a lot have put in moratoriums. There is a need to clarify the implementation of the act. "I doubt it will happen this year, but I hope it will happen soon. It's not good to keep people in limbo.''

 

State Sen. Gilda Jacobs, D-Huntington Woods, said of the law, "Clearly the enforcement part of this was not addressed well in what passed.''

 

On Aug. 25, 16 Oakland County people were arrested in drug raids by a narcotics enforcement team. The arrested people said they were following the letter of the law. Law enforcement officials said there were complaints about the dispensaries, and that people were selling marijuana to customers who were not patients.

 

Jacobs was aware of the raid, but "I don't think the raids were necessary to make the point the law should be changed.'' She said she believes the ballot proposal was "sold to the public that if someone suffering from a disease could get pain relief, this would be a humane way under a doctor's supervision to alleviate pain and suffering,'' she said. "Voters felt some emotional connection.''

 

She believes there is confusion about medical marijuana.

 

"This law is unclear and I believe the Legislature should take a look at it,'' she said. "But I doubt very much it will be taken up by in the lame duck session.''

 

State Rep. Ellen Cogen Lipton, D-Huntington Woods, said she has received complaints about medical marijuana from city officials in her district.

 

"The law needs to be reviewed and the ambiguities addressed,'' she said. "That would happen the first part of next session (in 2011).''

 

State Rep. Marty Knollenberg, R-Troy, called the medical marijuana law a "poorly crafted initiative'' with "too many loopholes.''

 

Knollenberg is sponsoring a bill that says any caregiver who has been convicted of a felony could not be a caregiver.

 

He called what is happening in Michigan now a "Wild West situation with so many trying to get into the business.''

 

Knollenberg calls for a study group with all parties involved to clarify the law.

 

"After that, you'll see medical marijuana be dispensed in some way,'' he said, noting that voters said they wanted this to be an alternative method of pain relief.

 

"We just need to tighten up the regulations,'' he said.

 

Knollenberg doesn't believe any change will occur this year. "Proponents of medical marijuana should be open to that,'' he said.''At the end of the day, they're going to have something. The more they scream, though, they may end up with nothing at all."

 

 

 

 

 

Dear Robert: I understand your frustration and anger over the events in Oakland County relating to medical marijuana clinics. Problems similar to this have been occurring all across the state and in our courts as the new law is being implemented. As a result, I am currently serving on a Medical Marijuana Task Force appointed by House Speaker Andy Dillon to look at amending the act to make it more clear and to avoid any issues like those that are occurring around the state currently. We hope to have recommendations made for amending the statutes before the end of this year. Thank you again for contacting me.

 

 

 

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Dear Robert: I understand your frustration and anger over the events in Oakland County relating to medical marijuana clinics. Problems similar to this have been occurring all across the state and in our courts as the new law is being implemented. As a result, I am currently serving on a Medical Marijuana Task Force appointed by House Speaker Andy Dillon to look at amending the act to make it more clear and to avoid any issues like those that are occurring around the state currently. We hope to have recommendations made for amending the statutes before the end of this year. Thank you again for contacting me.

 

 

 

 

i think they are wokimg hard to change this Law it was in my Email

i got from one of them from above

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This is the work of the "task force".

 

Source- http://www.gophouse.com/readarticle.asp?id=5863&District=74

 

State Rep. David Agema introduced legislation which brings clarity to Michigan's medical marijuana laws and provides regulation to ensure that the drug is only distributed by those who are authorized to do so, and that only those who are prescribed it can receive it.

 

A statewide ballot initiative allowing medical marijuana use was approved by voters in 2008.

 

"This legislation is necessary because the voters aren't getting what they thought they would get once this became law," said Agema, R-Grandville. "Current regulation would make it too easy for individuals to grow and sell their own marijuana, and I would like to see some stricter controls.

 

"This initiative isn't about making it harder for the people who need it to get medical marijuana. These bills simply clarify who can get the drug, who can give it out and what happens if people break the rules. My bills primarily insure that medical marijuana is only dispensed by licensed pharmacists."

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Once again - if they gain control over the supply - they gain control. (period)

"To be governed is to be watched, inspected, spied upon, directed, law-driven, numbered, regulated, enrolled, indoctrinated, preached at, controlled, checked, estimated, valued, censured, commanded, by creatures who have neither the right nor the wisdom nor the virtue to do so. To be governed is to be at every operation, at every transaction noted, registered, counted, taxed, stamped, measured, numbered, assessed, licensed, authorized, admonished, prevented, forbidden, reformed, corrected, punished. It is, under pretext of public utility, and in the name of the general interest, to be placed under contribution, drilled, fleeced, exploited, monopolized, extorted from, squeezed, hoaxed, robbed; then, at the slightest resistance, the first word of complaint, to be repressed, fined, vilified, harassed, hunted down, abused, clubbed, disarmed, bound, choked, imprisoned, judged, condemned, shot, deported, sacrificed, sold, betrayed; and to crown all, mocked, ridiculed, derided, outraged, dishonored. That is government; that is its justice; that is its morality."

 

-- Pierre-Joseph Proudhon, General Idea of Revolution in the Nineteenth Century

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"To be governed is to be watched, inspected, spied upon, directed, law-driven, numbered, regulated, enrolled, indoctrinated, preached at, controlled, checked, estimated, valued, censured, commanded, by creatures who have neither the right nor the wisdom nor the virtue to do so. To be governed is to be at every operation, at every transaction noted, registered, counted, taxed, stamped, measured, numbered, assessed, licensed, authorized, admonished, prevented, forbidden, reformed, corrected, punished. It is, under pretext of public utility, and in the name of the general interest, to be placed under contribution, drilled, fleeced, exploited, monopolized, extorted from, squeezed, hoaxed, robbed; then, at the slightest resistance, the first word of complaint, to be repressed, fined, vilified, harassed, hunted down, abused, clubbed, disarmed, bound, choked, imprisoned, judged, condemned, shot, deported, sacrificed, sold, betrayed; and to crown all, mocked, ridiculed, derided, outraged, dishonored. That is government; that is its justice; that is its morality."

 

-- Pierre-Joseph Proudhon, General Idea of Revolution in the Nineteenth Century

 

Maybe I was this guy in a past life. I can't believe how well he stated my feelings today.

Thanks for the find, Wild Bill. It may help me feel a bit better today, knowing someone else out here has put on his glasses with which to truly see. Thank you, my friend...

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Maybe I was this guy in a past life. I can't believe how well he stated my feelings today.

Thanks for the find, Wild Bill. It may help me feel a bit better today, knowing someone else out here has put on his glasses with which to truly see. Thank you, my friend...

 

Amen

 

And, Ditto.

 

Thank You! (for showing the world so clearly the real "plain and simple" truth that:)

 

"SHARING is CURING"

 

CURE to SHARE; SHARE to CURE

 

Be FREE to SHARE The HARVEST

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"To be governed is to be watched, inspected, spied upon, directed, law-driven, numbered, regulated, enrolled, indoctrinated, preached at, controlled, checked, estimated, valued, censured, commanded, by creatures who have neither the right nor the wisdom nor the virtue to do so. To be governed is to be at every operation, at every transaction noted, registered, counted, taxed, stamped, measured, numbered, assessed, licensed, authorized, admonished, prevented, forbidden, reformed, corrected, punished. It is, under pretext of public utility, and in the name of the general interest, to be placed under contribution, drilled, fleeced, exploited, monopolized, extorted from, squeezed, hoaxed, robbed; then, at the slightest resistance, the first word of complaint, to be repressed, fined, vilified, harassed, hunted down, abused, clubbed, disarmed, bound, choked, imprisoned, judged, condemned, shot, deported, sacrificed, sold, betrayed; and to crown all, mocked, ridiculed, derided, outraged, dishonored. That is government; that is its justice; that is its morality."

 

-- Pierre-Joseph Proudhon, General Idea of Revolution in the Nineteenth Century

 

 

Thank you Wild Bill!

 

(And, as for the article by Carol Hopkins that writes for the Oakland Press and Macomb Daily - she is nothing more that a paid shill for the right-wing gestapos!)

 

 

 

Mizerman

 

p.s. she quoted my alias in one of her articles without even checking the source!

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This is the work of the "task force".

 

Source- http://www.gophouse....863&District=74

 

State Rep. David Agema introduced legislation which brings clarity to Michigan's medical marijuana laws and provides regulation to ensure that the drug is only distributed by those who are authorized to do so, and that only those who are prescribed it can receive it.

 

A statewide ballot initiative allowing medical marijuana use was approved by voters in 2008.

 

"This legislation is necessary because the voters aren't getting what they thought they would get once this became law," said Agema, R-Grandville. "Current regulation would make it too easy for individuals to grow and sell their own marijuana, and I would like to see some stricter controls.

 

"This initiative isn't about making it harder for the people who need it to get medical marijuana. These bills simply clarify who can get the drug, who can give it out and what happens if people break the rules. My bills primarily insure that medical marijuana is only dispensed by licensed pharmacists."

 

Thanks E-Mail sent

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