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Leo Steals Medical Marijuana Patient’S Identity To Buy Medical Marijuana


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I really wish we weren't censored so what needs to be said can be said. This feces eating bottom dwelling slimy chicken sucker LEO needs to got to prison!

 

 

http://www.medicalmarijuana411.com/2011/02/07/police-officer-stole-medical-marijuana-patients-identity-to-buy-medical-marijuana/

 

Prosecutors have dropped drug dealing, cultivation and possession charges against a medical marijuana advocate in a case in which a Calaveras County sheriff’s deputy used a legitimate medical marijuana card to induce the man to sell the drug.

 

Court records show that Jay R. Smith, 37, pleaded no contest Friday to a single charge of aiding and abetting another person to commit a felony.

 

Smith was sentenced to pay a $160 fine and serve 90 days in jail but will not be subject to probation. The plea bargain means he will be able to continue his work advocating for medical marijuana patients, Smith said.

 

Smith’s arrest Jan. 4, 2010, prompted protests by medical marijuana users and providers. At the time, Smith was operating K Care Collective, a medical marijuana vendor.

 

Smith and court statements by law enforcement officers agree on the basic details of what happened: Calaveras County Sheriff’s Deputy Steve Avila posed as a legitimate medical marijuana user named Robert Shaffer of Ione and contacted Smith seeking to buy marijuana.

 

Avila had gained possession of Shaffer’s medical marijuana identification card in late 2009 during an earlier drug case against Shaffer.

 

Smith said that when he called Shaffer’s doctor, Dr. Philip A. Denney of Carmichael, the card proved to be legitimate. So he agreed to sell marijuana to Avila, not knowing that the officer had borrowed Shaffer’s identity.

 

Both Denney and Shaffer both later objected that they had not consented to Avila’s use of the card and did not know of Avila’s plans.

 

Smith reportedly delivered the marijuana to the man he thought was Shaffer in the Valley Oaks Center parking lot in Valley Springs.

 

Then-Sheriff Dennis Downum said meeting someone in a parking lot for a sale is not within the guidelines for legal medical marijuana.

 

Prosecutors agreed and pressed the case.

 

Smith said he pleaded no contest to save money. He said he had already spent $45,000 on attorneys, and going to trial would cost an additional $12,000, far more than the $160 fine in the plea bargain.

 

Court documents did not indicate who the other person was who committed a felony allegedly aided by Smith.

 

“The charge is a trade-off. There was nothing discussed in there about who that person was. And Shaffer had nothing to do with my case,” Smith said.

 

Deputy District Attorney Seth Matthews, the prosecutor who signed the plea agreement, was out of the office Monday afternoon and unavailable for comment.

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This subject pisses me off, If LEO wants a card to "bust" people why don't they go about the same way all of us had to.

 

1st thing they would find out is they HAVE TO BE SICK OR DISABLED to get a DR. to sign off on it.

 

2nd they would find out that once they have legally obtained their card, they would be subjected to the same scrutiny as all of us.

 

They would be looked down upon as a dope head, drug dealer, stoner, high on, probably lose their jobs cause you cant fight a war on drugs if you use the same ones they are fighting against.

 

There is so many things that are wrong with this.. if they are trying to show us how easy it is to obtain a illegal card and purchase MM, why not highlight the fact that they are breaking the law to do this and (IMO) entrapment is the cause for these arrests, and by doing the things that they are doing obtaining cards illegally they are in fact showing criminals a "how to guide" to commit these crimes. dummys why not approach it the correct way and provide the people with the LAW, as its written and show them the honest way of doing it and it would prevent these fraudulent ways and therefore crime would be drastically reduced. (IMHO)

 

Trix

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Smith said he pleaded no contest to save money. He said he had already spent $45,000 on attorneys, and going to trial would cost an additional $12,000, far more than the $160 fine in the plea bargain.

 

Court documents did not indicate who the other person was who committed a felony allegedly aided by Smith.

 

“The charge is a trade-off. There was nothing discussed in there about who that person was. And Shaffer had nothing to do with my case,” Smith said.

 

Deputy District Attorney Seth Matthews, the prosecutor who signed the plea agreement, was out of the office Monday afternoon and unavailable for comment.

 

 

Ok, so what's the story on the person who committed a felony that they are not talking about, the one Smith aided and abetted? and Smith's plea is a trade off? They have have a word for that.

 

Also......... where was the Doctor-Patient privilege?

 

Smith said that when he called Shaffer’s doctor, Dr. Philip A. Denney of Carmichael, the card proved to be legitimate. So he agreed to sell marijuana to Avila, not knowing that the officer had borrowed Shaffer’s identity.

 

How many ethic and civil rights were violated there i wonder?

 

:goodjob: SUE SUE SUE!!!!!:thumbsu:

 

 

Nice reply Hempchef, but there is a very large part of the story obviously being withheld, so I would hold my goodjob and thumbsup smilies for something worthwhile...

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I really wish we weren't censored so what needs to be said can be said. This feces eating bottom dwelling slimy chicken sucker LEO needs to got to prison!

 

 

http://www.medicalmarijuana411.com/2011/02/07/police-officer-stole-medical-marijuana-patients-identity-to-buy-medical-marijuana/

 

Prosecutors have dropped drug dealing, cultivation and possession charges against a medical marijuana advocate in a case in which a Calaveras County sheriff’s deputy used a legitimate medical marijuana card to induce the man to sell the drug.

 

Court records show that Jay R. Smith, 37, pleaded no contest Friday to a single charge of aiding and abetting another person to commit a felony.

 

Smith was sentenced to pay a $160 fine and serve 90 days in jail but will not be subject to probation. The plea bargain means he will be able to continue his work advocating for medical marijuana patients, Smith said.

 

Smith’s arrest Jan. 4, 2010, prompted protests by medical marijuana users and providers. At the time, Smith was operating K Care Collective, a medical marijuana vendor.

 

Smith and court statements by law enforcement officers agree on the basic details of what happened: Calaveras County Sheriff’s Deputy Steve Avila posed as a legitimate medical marijuana user named Robert Shaffer of Ione and contacted Smith seeking to buy marijuana.

 

Avila had gained possession of Shaffer’s medical marijuana identification card in late 2009 during an earlier drug case against Shaffer.

 

Smith said that when he called Shaffer’s doctor, Dr. Philip A. Denney of Carmichael, the card proved to be legitimate. So he agreed to sell marijuana to Avila, not knowing that the officer had borrowed Shaffer’s identity.

 

Both Denney and Shaffer both later objected that they had not consented to Avila’s use of the card and did not know of Avila’s plans.

 

Smith reportedly delivered the marijuana to the man he thought was Shaffer in the Valley Oaks Center parking lot in Valley Springs.

 

Then-Sheriff Dennis Downum said meeting someone in a parking lot for a sale is not within the guidelines for legal medical marijuana.

 

Prosecutors agreed and pressed the case.

 

Smith said he pleaded no contest to save money. He said he had already spent $45,000 on attorneys, and going to trial would cost an additional $12,000, far more than the $160 fine in the plea bargain.

 

Court documents did not indicate who the other person was who committed a felony allegedly aided by Smith.

 

“The charge is a trade-off. There was nothing discussed in there about who that person was. And Shaffer had nothing to do with my case,” Smith said.

 

Deputy District Attorney Seth Matthews, the prosecutor who signed the plea agreement, was out of the office Monday afternoon and unavailable for comment.

I wish people who read could add. This man's attorney fees = $57,000 to go to trial, and he was in the RIGHT. So what an ounce costs $20 to $70 to produce???? Where do the attorney fees come from? From 'donations' or 'transfers'. The producer/transferer has to get them from the consumer, ultimately the patient. This is the cost of doing business, and this is a business. It's also compassion: see in dictionary, "m.d." A compassionate provider of medical services WHO CHARGES MARKET PRICE. Also, whose insurance coverage may cost $100,000 per year, which includes that the policy providies a defense attorney, if needed.

 

What's the point? A smart and forward-looking grower charges market and readies an attorney fund equivalent to the potential need. He may provide to some patients at nominal/no charge, but the bulk of production has to be sold at sufficient price to 'pay the freight' if he's charged and, even if in the RIGHT, needs to spend that fund to defend.

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I really wish we weren't censored so what needs to be said can be said. This feces eating bottom dwelling slimy chicken sucker LEO needs to got to prison!

 

 

http://www.medicalmarijuana411.com/2011/02/07/police-officer-stole-medical-marijuana-patients-identity-to-buy-medical-marijuana/

 

Prosecutors have dropped drug dealing, cultivation and possession charges against a medical marijuana advocate in a case in which a Calaveras County sheriff’s deputy used a legitimate medical marijuana card to induce the man to sell the drug.

 

Court records show that Jay R. Smith, 37, pleaded no contest Friday to a single charge of aiding and abetting another person to commit a felony.

 

Smith was sentenced to pay a $160 fine and serve 90 days in jail but will not be subject to probation. The plea bargain means he will be able to continue his work advocating for medical marijuana patients, Smith said.

 

Smith’s arrest Jan. 4, 2010, prompted protests by medical marijuana users and providers. At the time, Smith was operating K Care Collective, a medical marijuana vendor.

 

Smith and court statements by law enforcement officers agree on the basic details of what happened: Calaveras County Sheriff’s Deputy Steve Avila posed as a legitimate medical marijuana user named Robert Shaffer of Ione and contacted Smith seeking to buy marijuana.

 

Avila had gained possession of Shaffer’s medical marijuana identification card in late 2009 during an earlier drug case against Shaffer.

 

Smith said that when he called Shaffer’s doctor, Dr. Philip A. Denney of Carmichael, the card proved to be legitimate. So he agreed to sell marijuana to Avila, not knowing that the officer had borrowed Shaffer’s identity.

 

Both Denney and Shaffer both later objected that they had not consented to Avila’s use of the card and did not know of Avila’s plans.

 

Smith reportedly delivered the marijuana to the man he thought was Shaffer in the Valley Oaks Center parking lot in Valley Springs.

 

Then-Sheriff Dennis Downum said meeting someone in a parking lot for a sale is not within the guidelines for legal medical marijuana.

 

Prosecutors agreed and pressed the case.

 

Smith said he pleaded no contest to save money. He said he had already spent $45,000 on attorneys, and going to trial would cost an additional $12,000, far more than the $160 fine in the plea bargain.

 

Court documents did not indicate who the other person was who committed a felony allegedly aided by Smith.

 

“The charge is a trade-off. There was nothing discussed in there about who that person was. And Shaffer had nothing to do with my case,” Smith said.

 

Deputy District Attorney Seth Matthews, the prosecutor who signed the plea agreement, was out of the office Monday afternoon and unavailable for comment.

I wish people who read could add. This man's attorney fees = $57,000 to go to trial, and he was in the RIGHT. So what an ounce costs $20 to $70 to produce???? Where do the attorney fees come from? From 'donations' or 'transfers'. The producer/transferer has to get them from the consumer, ultimately the patient. This is the cost of doing business, and this is a business. It's also compassion: see in dictionary, "m.d." A compassionate provider of medical services WHO CHARGES MARKET PRICE. Also, whose insurance coverage may cost $100,000 per year, which includes that the policy provides a defense attorney, if needed.

 

What's the point? A smart and forward-looking grower charges market and readies an attorney fund equivalent to the potential need. He may provide to some patients at nominal/no charge, but the bulk of production has to be sold at sufficient price to 'pay the freight' if he's charged and, even if in the RIGHT, needs to spend that fund to defend.

Edited by grewett
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