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Lock It In Your Trunk, Have A Nice Holiday


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This is how LEO should react when discovering a motorist in legal possession of cannabis. This e mail is from an acquaintance who is a patient and caregiver as is her husband.

 

By learning you will teach; by teaching you will learn.

- Latin proverb

 

Ed

========================================================================================

From: Lynn xxxxx <xxxxx64@yahoo.com> Sat, April 23, 2011 12:26:58 PM

To: Glen <xxxxxxx@yahoo.com>; Janet <xxxxxx1@live.com>

 

Ed

 

Roger was pulled over last-night in Roseville coming home from work for a headlight being out and got a fix-it ticket but. When he opened up his glove-box to retrieve insurance papers medicine fell on the floor, the glove-box was locked.

 

The patrolman asked if he had taken any in the last four hours and if he was a registered patient or caregiver with the state, as you know he is both. He had planned on dropping it off at his patients house but missed him and just continued on to work.

 

The patrolman asked for his caregiver ID , drivers license which Roger nervously presented along with insurance papers. The patrolman asked Roger to get back in the car and sit down and went back to his car and called on his radio I would guess to check my old mans driving record.

 

He came back to the car and asked Roger if he was telling the truth about not having used any cannabis and of course he hadn't he was at work and does not, never has, would not if he could (cannot) medicate at work.

 

The patrolman handed back all of Rogers paper work and told him to lock his medicine in the trunk before he drives off, get the headlight fixed, and have a nice holiday.

 

The patrolman handled the situation professionally and with tact with-out turning into something much worse.

 

This is the second time one of us has had an encounter with L.E. while in possession and released as we should be and one as you know was an Oakland County Sheriffs Deputy.

 

I thought you might want to share this with all of our other patients/caregivers and supporters.

 

Have a wonderful holiday, looking forward to May 25th.

 

 

Lynn & Roger

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No place in the law does it say to have it locked in your trunk....HJ

 

It's not quite that easy. Having the medicine within "easy" access becomes the first step in being suspected of DUIM.

 

If you don't remember the alphabet as well these days, or have one leg shorter than the other, i would listen to the kind officer and keep your meds safely out of reach (from both temptation and the law!), locked in the trunk of your car.

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Sounds like it was a good encounter handled well on both sides. As for locking it in the trunk, it was a reasonable request from a lawful authority. I see no reason not to comply and wish him a happy holiday. The above point about the first step in DUID is very valid and I would think that locking it in the trunk out of easy access only makes you safer. We should clearly do it and it is good advice.

 

Dr. Bob

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This is how LEO should react when discovering a motorist in legal possession of cannabis. This e mail is from an acquaintance who is a patient and caregiver as is her husband.

 

By learning you will teach; by teaching you will learn.

- Latin proverb

 

Ed

========================================================================================

From: Lynn xxxxx <xxxxx64@yahoo.com> Sat, April 23, 2011 12:26:58 PM

To: Glen <xxxxxxx@yahoo.com>; Janet <xxxxxx1@live.com>

 

Ed

 

Roger was pulled over last-night in Roseville coming home from work for a headlight being out and got a fix-it ticket but. When he opened up his glove-box to retrieve insurance papers medicine fell on the floor, the glove-box was locked.

 

The patrolman asked if he had taken any in the last four hours and if he was a registered patient or caregiver with the state, as you know he is both. He had planned on dropping it off at his patients house but missed him and just continued on to work.

 

The patrolman asked for his caregiver ID , drivers license which Roger nervously presented along with insurance papers. The patrolman asked Roger to get back in the car and sit down and went back to his car and called on his radio I would guess to check my old mans driving record.

 

He came back to the car and asked Roger if he was telling the truth about not having used any cannabis and of course he hadn't he was at work and does not, never has, would not if he could (cannot) medicate at work.

 

The patrolman handed back all of Rogers paper work and told him to lock his medicine in the trunk before he drives off, get the headlight fixed, and have a nice holiday.

 

The patrolman handled the situation professionally and with tact with-out turning into something much worse.

 

This is the second time one of us has had an encounter with L.E. while in possession and released as we should be and one as you know was an Oakland County Sheriffs Deputy.

 

I thought you might want to share this with all of our other patients/caregivers and supporters.

 

Have a wonderful holiday, looking forward to May 25th.

 

 

Lynn & Roger

 

 

Kudos to the patrolman for not overstepping his authority and ruining someones life for not violating the MMMA.

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Sounds like it was a good encounter handled well on both sides. As for locking it in the trunk, it was a reasonable request from a lawful authority. I see no reason not to comply and wish him a happy holiday. The above point about the first step in DUID is very valid and I would think that locking it in the trunk out of easy access only makes you safer. We should clearly do it and it is good advice.

 

Dr. Bob

 

However it's not in the law to have it locked in your trunk........Saying it enough will cause those in power to believe it's so.......HJ

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Sounds like it was a good encounter handled well on both sides. As for locking it in the trunk, it was a reasonable request from a lawful authority. I see no reason not to comply and wish him a happy holiday. The above point about the first step in DUID is very valid and I would think that locking it in the trunk out of easy access only makes you safer. We should clearly do it and it is good advice.

 

Dr. Bob

True. It should NOT be within arm's reach. One can quote the law all they want on this subject - but why put yourself in a situation so law enforcement has the opportunity to mess with you?

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True. It should NOT be within arm's reach. One can quote the law all they want on this subject - but why put yourself in a situation so law enforcement has the opportunity to mess with you?

 

Congrads, you see the point, why ask for trouble or give them excuses. Too many jail house lawyers spoiling for a fight in here, lets see what we can do to foster cooperation, not confrontation.

 

Dr. Bob

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No place in the law does it say to have it locked in your trunk....HJ

 

 

Thats what im saying,,why do we have to make up our own rules to be safe? the law is already written! Im not hiding nothing any more,,,I want the cops to hide and keep there butts away from me! my signature says all i need to say,,,,I dont even have to post any more!

 

Peace

legalize mj not just mm

FTW

Jim

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A toolbox with a padlock. Was told they need a separate warrant if they take it that far. I have to hand it to the officer though he Handle it well and professional may many more be taught but this man. Thank you officer my hat is off to you please teach all fellow officers that this is how the situation needs to be handled.

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A toolbox with a padlock. Was told they need a separate warrant if they take it that far. I have to hand it to the officer though he Handle it well and professional may many more be taught but this man. Thank you officer my hat is off to you please teach all fellow officers that this is how the situation needs to be handled.

 

Big J, that was your 420th post.

Just sayin'.

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Good to hear of a positive encounter w/ le! :goodjob:

 

I for one choose not to nit pic at Our Law as

those opposed choose to. There may not

be anything written as to how/ where we

are to carry/ transport our meds in a vehicle.

I only believe, out of sight, out of mind.

Be safe and not give cause for them to hassle

me. I drive a van and have no trunk either.

There are ways to be stealth. :sword:

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Congrads, you see the point, why ask for trouble or give them excuses. Too many jail house lawyers spoiling for a fight in here, lets see what we can do to foster cooperation, not confrontation.

 

Dr. Bob

Thanks for the response. I don't neccessarily care if someone agrees with my about any of my feelings about MMJ, but why would anyone want to give LEO another reason to mess with you in any encounter with them? My point is this - what if you had a visible prescription of a narcotic or opiate in the passenger seat of your car when pulled over for speeding, or alcohol? Have a great week Dr. Bob

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