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Anyone else tried/have this?

 

Abso Air

 

odorconrolcylinders.jpg

 

 

 

My can filter kinda puked out after about 6 months,(I'm not bashing, just poor). So, I thought I'd try something different. I just put it in yesterday, and it seems to work at least as well as my can filter did. Dropped my room temp by a couple degrees and the lingering smell seems to have moved on!

$300 filled (50#'s of thier proprietary carbon blend)), $150 for fresh carbon(50#'s), little pricey, but I don't have to worry about kids, trick or gramming!

 

He has an office in Waterford and a distributor in Livonia. 248-682-2000

(No, I don't work for them, He was extremely helpful so I'm sharing :thumbsu: )

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the trick is the right carbon. you need activated charcoal, like in an aquarium filter. ain't cheap.

 

what we need is a referbisher. an old carbon filter can be baked to re-activate the charcoal that is already in there. replace the sock and it's good as new

A carbon filter take back program would be great, also.

 

Instead of throwing the clogged filter away, the old one is returned to the grow store, or (ACE hardware :thumbsu: ) that sells the same brand for a core credit.

The clogged filter is sent to a 3rd party refurbishment outfits locally operated, perhaps even at the grow store ;) , and then returned to the sales floor as a refurbished unit priced 30%-50% below new filter prices.

 

I think I'll ask the folks at Nothern Lights about this refurbishment process when I'm down there this week...

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the trick is the right carbon. you need activated charcoal, like in an aquarium filter. ain't cheap.

 

what we need is a referbisher. an old carbon filter can be baked to re-activate the charcoal that is already in there. replace the sock and it's good as new

 

But at what temp to "bake" it and for how long? I really don't want to hear about someody throwing it in the oven at 400F and burning down the house.

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well, found this:

 

Physical reactivation:

The precursor is developed into activated carbons using gases. This is generally done by using one or combining the following processes:

Carbonization: Material with carbon content is pyrolysed at temperatures in the range 600-900 °C, in absence of air (usually in inert atmosphere with gases like argon)

 

 

Activation/Oxidation:

Raw material or carbonised material is exposed to oxidizing atmospheres (carbon dioxide, oxygen, or steam) at temperatures above 250 °C, usually in the temperature range 600-1200 °C.

 

 

Chemical activation:

Impregnation with chemicals such as acids like phosphoric acid or bases like potassium hydroxide, sodium hydroxide or salts like zinc chloride, followed by carbonization at temperatures in the range 450-900 °C. It is believed that the carbonization / activation step proceeds simultaneously with the chemical activation. This technique can be problematic in some cases because, for example, zinc trace residues may remain in the end product. However, chemical activation is preferred over physical activation owing to the lower temperatures and shorter time needed for activating material.

 

Saturated activated carbon can be regenerated by heating.

 

Source(s):

 

Wikipedia

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Did someone need to use my kiln? :D

 

Don't laugh, I thought about that. I don't know how I'd get a Can75 into my Aim 84BD though. :)

 

If I'm not mistaken, the high high heat and/or chemicals are used to manufacture the carbon for the filters. I was told by a chemist that also hunts and uses the carbon scent block clothing that it can be baked to burn off the VOCs aka the stink. It's been a few years and I'm guessing at this, but I think he told me about 450F, which would be well within the range of any kiln I'd imagine.

 

Once this long in the tooth Can filter goes out to pasture, I might throw a pound or two in the kiln to see if....

 

a) It actually works

b) It stinks as bad as I think it would when it releases the odors.

 

My problem would be keeping the temp down in the 450F range, I don't have a digital controller. If it were viable, I'm sure a big enough contraption could be constructed to hold an entire filter without removing all the carbon. Not sure how flange seals and that sort of thing would like that kind of heat though.

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  • 3 weeks later...

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