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DETROIT, MI — Marijuana reform activists in Michigan will launch a signature petition drive this week to place a bill on the November ballot that would allow adults 21 and over to possess small amounts of marijuana.

 

If successful, Michigan would join Colorado and Washington at the new frontier of cannabis legalization in the United States. Similar campaigns in both states have already successfully placed legalization initiatives on their November ballots.

 

Matt-Abel-300x199.jpg Detroit attorney Matt Abel is leading Michigan's marijuana legalization campaign. (image/NORML)

 

The Michigan campaign is being coordinated by Detroit attorney Matthew Abel, a state registered medical marijuana patient. Medical marijuana has been allowed in Michigan since voters’ overwhelming 63% approval of a 2008 ballot initiave.

 

Many officials and law enforcement authorities have critized Michigan’s medical marijuana law, saying that it has been widely abused and is a cover for drug dealers. The medical marijuana act itself doesn’t actually legalize medical marijuana, but instead creates an “exception to illegality.” And this has led to chaos for patients, medical authorities, police, and courts in implementing the law.

 

Even legalization proponents agreethat the law is flawed. “The medical law is not working,” said Abel.

 

Which is why his campaign is focused on legalization of cannabis for all purposes, including recreational use.

 

If Able’s signature campaign is successful, Michigan voters would be presented with a question on the November ballot that would make Michigan one of the nation’s first states to abolish criminal penalties for anyone 21 years old or older possessing, growing, and selling marijuana.

 

“Rather than try to rebuild [medical marijuana] and have more of the same type of problems, we needed to go something broader than that,” he continued. “It would be for religious, medical and personal use, industrial use and agricultural use — we’re putting all that right in the wording.”

 

523px-BillSchuette-261x300.jpg Michigan Attorney General Bill Schutte, who's stubborn anti-dispensary campaign has marijuana activists focused on full legalization. (image/wikimedia)

 

If the question is placed on the ballot, expect outlash from police, government officials and state leaders, who will likely fight the campaign with scare tactics and long-abused marijuana myths.

 

“Most responsible statewide leaders will oppose the legalization of drugs,” said Michigan Attorney General Bill Schutte. “It doesn’t keep citizens safe and it doesn’t provide paychecks. We are trying to rebuild Michigan and rebuild the economy. This petition doesn’t mean more jobs and it doesn’t keep our communities safe.”

 

http://www.thedailychronic.net/2012/7824/michigan-legalization-drive-begins-wednesday/

 

 

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The ballot to legalize marijuana is welcome. It's time to free marijuana from the hands of those who would profit by lying about marijuana, like the government employees who work for Gov. Snyder including the courts,and teachers and law enforcement,and the unions, the large corporations, insurance companies and some lawyers and doctors. Their votes are numbered.

On the other hand, the people of Michigan have lifted their heads up above the man-made sea of brainwash, and see clearly the deliberate errors proffered by the Supreme Court to deny religious freedom to wit: cannibis use in worship in several cases in Michigan. Common sense dictates a natural remedy where possible, but marijuana has long been denied for medical reasons because of the dishonesty of the people in power to continue to profit from illegal marijuana (the police, the courts and its officers, the jail industry, and the lobbies representing pharmaceuticals, tobacco, cotton, paper, oil, etc. all at the expense of the sick and maimed. And don't forget business. Mr.Snyder claims he is pro business, but that's only as far as his prejudices will allow, for he and Mr. Schutte quashed a peaceful growing marijuana compassion club- dispensary industry that was self-governing and self-regulating. So it only makes sense to support legalized marijuana and vote to remove the marijuana antagonists out of office.Peace.

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I admit that I haven't seen the ballot proposal yet, but I'm a little pessimistic and skeptical about its contents after how all the problems cropped up with the vagueness of the 2008 law.

 

I can't help but wonder if this is really the smartest thing to try such a drastic end-game measure this early. While it did pass in 2008 by a wide margin, we haven't even had a complete four years to fix the issues with our current law (dispensaries, patient to patient transfers, grow co-ops, medicine confiscation, etc.). In comparison, it took California over a decade after having a Medical Marijuana law (where they actually explicitly allowed dispensaries) before they even tried to legalize it and it was shot down - and remember, this was California, a traditionally far more liberal state in many respects than Michigan.

 

It wasn't until around late 2010 when I started seeing growing equipment shops and dispensaries pop up in my area (and consequently see the dispensaries get kicked out all over the area through ordinances).

As a patient, if there are no strong legal protections in this proposal for people who use it solely for medicinal purposes when it's completely legalized in the state, it's going to be very hard for me to get behind this. The reason is, if you or someone you know has ever been in the legal system before and were put on bond, probation or parole where a Judge or a Parole Board set a condition where someone can't use or possess Alcohol as a condition of your release, that theoretically would put marijuana in the same category as Alcohol as being a recreational, non-essential substance rather than one used for true medicinal purposes, and thus allow for a marijuana user to be thrown in jail or prison for violating those terms, even if they have a legitimate medical reason. The same could apply for a sick and disabled person on welfare assistance who could lose their benefits because of "substance abuse".

 

Another big concern is what I see with the mentality of the average right of center moderate voter over 40 who decided to vote for strictly MEDICAL marijuana. I've heard from many of these types in very conservative areas of this state where the initiative didn't pass by wide margins, who only voted in favor of medical marijuana because of compassion reasons. When they get wind that it's trying to be outright legalized this early by the same people who claimed it was strictly for sick people, I would be very surprised if they wouldn't be adamantly opposed to it. I don't think we can reasonably count on a majority of the citizens to return to the ballot box with the same level of support this early to vote in support of legalization until they see that the medical model working with thriving dispensaries, grow co-ops and responsible medical use works all around the state, if they weren't being shut down and kicked out of town before being given a chance.

 

My biggest fear is that if the current problems with our medical marijuana law aren't worked out in 2012 through a ballot initiative and all efforts are put towards outright legalization and it fails (which I honestly expect it to), it will give municipalities, law enforcement, the courts and Atty General Bill Schuette more time to pick apart the 2008 law and thus make it much harder to legally grow or obtain medical marijuana anywhere before we have can try again in another four years (presidential elections are the only logical time to put it on the ballot because of the voter turnout).

 

Thoughts anyone?

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Work needs to be done to the drug control our outrageous penalties & sentencing. As President Jimmy Carter said in the 1970’s: “The penalties should not be harsher than the crime.”

I always like to read what you have to say and I always have to much to say .

 

It never made sense for personal cultivation to be a felony for anyone . People cultivating for personal use are actually causing less harm so why harsher penalties without evidence of sales ? By growing for personal use people are not supporting cartels or gangs and they do not put their money in the underground networks taking it out of State . They know what they have and what is in their herbal product . It never should be a automatic distribution charge there are allot of people whom would never do so . I feel terrible when I see people arrested that were just helping patients obtain genetics at cost or without renumeration of any amount so that people are safe and not searching the back alleys .

 

Allot of people from the 60's and 70's still have the concept of sharing what they don't need for themselves or bartering for other natural medicinal items . Sadly they don't see the possibility of unjust arrest for supporting medical use in a safer manner as disdained by hardliners . With medical defenses not being allowed in courts we need protection for these trusting vulnerable souls . It is obvious the checks and balances in the Judicial and Law Enforcement community are not enough because of the discrimination that still exists . Were all human after all . Patients definitely need protections to adjunctive medicine involving cannabis also . It should not be a red flag or distraction when going to a ER or any Doctor .

 

I thought allot about what BB said about CPU and they have some caring and very intelligent people but they are mistakenly not working at removing criminality from the equation which is what is required for progress . Dosing should not be a restriction that causes arrest , same with personal limts etc . This idea of that criminality begins at using more then 1 oz a week is not well thought out with such disparities in quality and what it infact is . Someone in detox or using oils requires allot of product . We should never give up a limit that triggers illegal determinations . It is true if the act is enforced always with the patient in mind and implemented properly there would be no problems . A medical defense was designed to sort out any cases for patients whom triggered illegal thresholds to protect them under medical use . No patients with legitimate medical needs should have charges brought against them since 2008 . How can the legislator make it happen ? When they remove the criminality in practice the benefits to the State and Society will be easier to see . People on the program benefiting need a open door to jobs , volujnteering , and education to move forward not more barriers to access or punishment .

Edited by Croppled1
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Sec. 8. (a) Except as provided in section 7, a patient and a patient's primary caregiver, if any, may assert the medical purpose for using marihuana as a defense to any prosecution involving marihuana, and this defense shall be presumed valid where the evidence shows that:

this is the only place i can find that the Law does not say Qualified patients

only patients

 

 

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Sec. 8. (a) Except as provided in section 7, a patient and a patient's primary caregiver, if any, may assert the medical purpose for using marihuana as a defense to any prosecution involving marihuana, and this defense shall be presumed valid where the evidence shows that:

this is the only place i can find that the Law does not say Qualified patients

only patients

 

Section 8 does not provide any protection for those on probation or parole for other crimes, or on bond for those accused of crimes. It only applies to prosecution - a judge has wider discretion over probation or bond as it's considered an alternative to jail. That said, if outright legalization happens, there is no longer any justification for having a medical reason when subjected to any of those terms (and thus be treated like alcohol is).

Edited by t0rpid
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You know I'm all in. I've been saying we need to do this almost since the medical marijuana law was instated. I will always keep my medical marijuana license renewed but I'm all for legalization.

 

WNEM took a poll yesterday. Last time I saw it about 80% said YES and only 17% said NO. They took the poll down because that station doesn't seem to be on the side of medical marijuana. I think the reason was that they actually thought the poll would go in favor of non legalization. Not even close.....................

 

It only makes common sense to legalize.

 

Thanks again Scheute for making this possible. Before medical marijuana, legalization probably wouldn't have passed. Now that you have fought the will of the people you have them good and mad. Marijuana legalization will win with flying colors now. Bill Scheute you are a blessing in disguise.

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Section 8 does not provide any protection for those on probation or parole for other crimes, or on bond for those accused of crimes. It only applies to prosecution - a judge has wider discretion over probation or bond as it's considered an alternative to jail. That said, if outright legalization happens, there is no longer any justification for having a medical reason when subjected to any of those terms (and thus be treated like alcohol is).

 

Not trying to throw a wrench in your idea but when on probation you are not allowed to drink so you know marijuana will be treated the same.....

 

Medical marijuana should be treated quite differently though. Of course it is not..........

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You know I'm all in. I've been saying we need to do this almost since the medical marijuana law was instated. I will always keep my medical marijuana license renewed but I'm all for legalization.

 

WNEM took a poll yesterday. Last time I saw it about 80% said YES and only 17% said NO. They took the poll down because that station doesn't seem to be on the side of medical marijuana. I think the reason was that they actually thought the poll would go in favor of non legalization. Not even close.....................

 

It only makes common sense to legalize.

 

Thanks again Scheute for making this possible. Before medical marijuana, legalization probably wouldn't have passed. Now that you have fought the will of the people you have them good and mad. Marijuana legalization will win with flying colors now. Bill Scheute you are a blessing in disguise.

 

i didn't think about it like that until now you just maybe right Bill S. may have helped us out and does not even no it

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Not trying to throw a wrench in your idea but when on probation you are not allowed to drink so you know marijuana will be treated the same.....

 

Medical marijuana should be treated quite differently though. Of course it is not..........

 

That's my biggest beef... Another thing is, supposedly this legalization ballot measure is supposed to prohibit people from denying people's right to use, but judges weren't supposed to be able to deny people's right to use for medicinal reasons under the 2008 law while on probation either, and yet they still routinely get away with it.

 

I think this bill needs some teeth to throw anyone in a position of authority in jail who denies people's right to use and give them a taste of what the marijuana users have been dealing with for decades. I'm not a lawyer, but doesn't that make better sense than simply saying "no, you can't do this" without some sort of real penalty to deter these people? How else will they learn?

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That's my biggest beef... Another thing is, supposedly this legalization ballot measure is supposed to prohibit people from denying people's right to use, but judges weren't supposed to be able to deny people's right to use for medicinal reasons under the 2008 law while on probation either, and yet they still routinely get away with it.

 

I think this bill needs some teeth to throw anyone in a position of authority in jail who denies people's right to use and give them a taste of what the marijuana users have been dealing with for decades. I'm not a lawyer, but doesn't that make better sense than simply saying "no, you can't do this" without some sort of real penalty to deter these people? How else will they learn?

 

 

i agree Vote the people out that wont obey the people's Law

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i agree Vote the people out that wont obey the people's Law

 

You can't throw the people out when the majority in your area thinks the judges are doing a fine job.

Thats why you make it illegal with criminal penalties, so if they do, they lose their job and risk disbarment.

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You can't throw the people out when the majority in your area thinks the judges are doing a fine job.

Thats why you make it illegal with criminal penalties, so if they do, they lose their job and risk disbarment.

 

OK what do you think we can do about it call them out fine things that they are against and get the word out and let your Rep know about it

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You can't throw the people out when the majority in your area thinks the judges are doing a fine job.

Thats why you make it illegal with criminal penalties, so if they do, they lose their job and risk disbarment.

 

There have been many many times in the last three years that officials have broken the criminal sections of the MMMMA.

 

Not one single one of them has been charged.

 

NO .. they are completely ignoring this law. Including the criminal actions committed by the police and courts.

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There have been many many times in the last three years that officials have broken the criminal sections of the MMMMA.

 

Not one single one of them has been charged.

 

NO .. they are completely ignoring this law. Including the criminal actions committed by the police and courts.

 

i agree with that

and now we are hearing from the judge's and the PA that the MMMA Law is very clear wounder why?

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