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Decarboxylating Already-Infused Butter?


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Hey everyone!

 

I recently produced some products with some cannabutter of mine and had them sent off for testing to Cannalytics. I got my results back and it turns out that a large percentage of my butter is still not decarboxylated properly. Having patients that depend on these products, I don't want to risk selling anything not worthy of consumption. Therefore, my question is this: Is there any way to properly finish a decarboxylation process on butter that has already been infused? I was thinking possibly stove-topping it for a few more hours while monitorring the temperature so it doesn't go above 250 degree, but would this even work? I really appreciate any help you all have to offer! Thanks :) !

Edited by Fractalize
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Hey everyone!

 

I recently produced some products with some cannabutter of mine and had them sent off for testing to Cannalytics. I got my results back and it turns out that a large percentage of my butter is still not decarboxylated properly. Having patients that depend on these products, I don't want to risk selling anything not worthy of consumption. Therefore, my question is this: Is there any way to properly finish a decarboxylation process on butter that has already been infused? I was thinking possibly stove-topping it for a few more hours while monitorring the temperature so it doesn't go above 250 degree, but would this even work? I really appreciate any help you all have to offer! Thanks :) !

 

Just because your butter isn't completely activated doesn't mean it doesn't work. It just means there's hidden potential. For plant material & hash that are pre-activated in the oven before mixing with other ingredients, we recommend heating the material for 300 degrees Fahrenheit for 15 minutes. Yes, this is what it takes to convert THCA into THC, no significant amount of CBN is produced in this amount of time. We're experts on cannabis chemistry, not butter chemistry, so I'm not sure what temperatures butter can be heated to or for how long before it begins to degrade. If the temperature is lower than 300 degrees, the time will have to be longer than 15 minutes. Also, make sure to pre-heat your metal tray or glass dish when decarboxylating plant material and hash, not doing so will cause only a 50% activation.

Edited by Cannalytics
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Just because your butter isn't completely activated doesn't mean it doesn't work. It just means there's hidden potential. For plant material & hash that are pre-activated in the oven before mixing with other ingredients, we recommend heating the material for 300 degrees Fahrenheit for 15 minutes. Yes, this is what it takes to convert THCA into THC, no significant amount of CBN is produced in this amount of time. We're experts on cannabis chemistry, not butter chemistry, so I'm not sure what temperatures butter can be heated to or for how long before it begins to degrade. If the temperature is lower than 300 degrees, the time will have to be longer than 15 minutes. Also, make sure to pre-heat your metal tray or glass dish when decarboxylating plant material and hash, not doing so will cause only a 50% activation.

 

I was looking into the properties of the "butter" as well to try and gauge the survivability. I'm actually using a coconut oil base for my "butter", and found this scholarly article regarding the degradation of coconut oil: http://www.journal.su.ac.th/index.php/sustj/article/view/130

 

So, according to this, it seems that the coconut oil would be viable to temperatures far beyond the survival capabilities of the infused THC, cannabinoids, etc. Does this offer any further thought to your consideration of my endeavors?

Edited by Fractalize
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keep in mid that if your baking with the butter, those temps will help to decarb as well, but keep in mind that most internal temps from baking dont reach oven tempshot.gif, just decarb before you process into butter.

 

You're right on about decarboxylating before you do anything else with your edibles. We get asked tons of what if scenarios on a regular basis regarding a variety of product types and my answer is always the same: there's no way to tell without testing so why don't you just follow the guideline we've made available of heating for 300 degF at 15 minutes. There's peer reviewed data to support this time and temperature combination and it has been validated by our lab as well. It works.

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You're right on about decarboxylating before you do anything else with your edibles. We get asked tons of what if scenarios on a regular basis regarding a variety of product types and my answer is always the same: there's no way to tell without testing so why don't you just follow the guideline we've made available of heating for 300 degF at 15 minutes. There's peer reviewed data to support this time and temperature combination and it has been validated by our lab as well. It works.

 

 

I have another question: I'm currently brewing a batch in my crockpot to test for the first time. I've had it on the "warm" setting since about 7pm last night. There is also a "low" and "high" setting. I can still put my finger in the butter without it being too hot, even with it being on "warm" for so long. Is my temperature not high enough? If so, what would you recommend I adjust before cooling this batch to ensure its highest bioavailability?

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I have another question: I'm currently brewing a batch in my crockpot to test for the first time. I've had it on the "warm" setting since about 7pm last night. There is also a "low" and "high" setting. I can still put my finger in the butter without it being too hot, even with it being on "warm" for so long. Is my temperature not high enough? If so, what would you recommend I adjust before cooling this batch to ensure its highest bioavailability?

 

You can see from the graph that zachw posted that it will take an extremely long time to activate at lower temperatures. I don't believe the exact times & temperatures in that graph since it takes 15 minutes at 300 degrees Fahrenheit to fully activate dry plant material but the general trends are correct. Next time I would stick to activating the plant material before mixing it with the butter, we haven't validated how long it takes to activate once you're mixed with butter but it would very likely be different than 300degrees for 15 minutes.

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  • 1 year later...

i thought zach's graph might answer my question but instead i think it raised more. i was wondering how fast thc degraded at 300 deg f after the first 15 min. to decarboxilate it. anyone. i guess i would rather get a consistant 85-90% activation rather than quickly going to 70% or lower

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Hey everyone!

 

I recently produced some products with some cannabutter of mine and had them sent off for testing to Cannalytics. I got my results back and it turns out that a large percentage of my butter is still not decarboxylated properly. Having patients that depend on these products, I don't want to risk selling anything not worthy of consumption. Therefore, my question is this: Is there any way to properly finish a decarboxylation process on butter that has already been infused? I was thinking possibly stove-topping it for a few more hours while monitorring the temperature so it doesn't go above 250 degree, but would this even work? I really appreciate any help you all have to offer! Thanks smile.gif !

I would recomend putting your butter an lb or 2 at a time on the stove top, put your self enough water in the pan first so you dont burn the butter and bring the temp up more if you want it done quicker if your in no hurry cook it a lil longer at 350, all the while making sure there is water in the pan, when your done pour it into something to put it in the fridge for a while to seperate your butter from the water, and that should take care of it, no mater what your cooking with it, I like to just put the butter on toast or bagles, I did to many brownies and gained more weight then I wanted to this winter, but I wasnt in much pain! :yahoo-wave: , If you realy are not sure or dont trust any of the answers you recieved here, go on youtube, I bet they have directions with video to help you with your minor problem!

 

I also think just baking with it will help,  but id prob go thru directions I gave you since I love working with mm in any way shape or form!

It is good to learn as much as you can about extractons, whether for oils, butter, tinctures, salad dressings, it is unbeleivable what you can make with your mm, you can fit it into your diet, all 3 meals, you just need to know your potency and know when you want couch lock or to lay in bed and sleep good, or be able to work and try to stay pain free!

 

Peace

Jim

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 "THC acid and the other necessary cannabinoid acids are not psychoactive until they decarboxylate (lose an acidic carboxyl group [COOHI). It is the cannabinoid acids which move along the biosynthetic pathway, and these acids undergo the strategic reactions that determine the position of any particular cannabinoid molecule along the pathway. After the resins are secreted by the glandular trichome they begin to harden and the cannabinoid acids begin to decarboxylate. Any remaining cannabinoid acids are decarboxylated by heat within a few days after harvesting."-cannabis botany by R. C. Clarke ....... Is this information wrong? Doesn't the drying of the plant  decarboxylate it or just not fully? 

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 "THC acid and the other necessary cannabinoid acids are not psychoactive until they decarboxylate (lose an acidic carboxyl group [COOHI). It is the cannabinoid acids which move along the biosynthetic pathway, and these acids undergo the strategic reactions that determine the position of any particular cannabinoid molecule along the pathway. After the resins are secreted by the glandular trichome they begin to harden and the cannabinoid acids begin to decarboxylate. Any remaining cannabinoid acids are decarboxylated by heat within a few days after harvesting."-cannabis botany by R. C. Clarke ....... Is this information wrong? Doesn't the drying of the plant  decarboxylate it or just not fully? 

it does for smoking, not completely for medibles, and of course it does make a difference on what you use to extract the oil,  just plain smoking a dried budd carbolizes it, but to just eat a budd it is not as good as carbolized oil! for several reasons, you can look up which cbd's and thc's take what temp to carbolize them, if you are making oil out of butane or iso alcohol it is very important to carbolize the oil after extraction!  but if your gonna eat it, it makes a difference, I wouldnt think of telling some one to eat my bho unless I knew for sure it was carbolized!

 

 

Peace

Jim

Edited by phaquetoo
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