Jump to content

Cannaboids Eases Pain


Yaamon
 Share

Recommended Posts

Over Two-Dozen Controlled Trials Demonstrate Cannabinoids’ “Statistically Significant Pain Relieving Effects”

 

by Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director March 7, 2012

shareshare

 

 

[Editor's note: This post is excerpted from this week's forthcoming NORML weekly media advisory. To have NORML's news alerts and legislative advisories delivered straight to your in-box, sign up here.]

 

Cannabis and its active constituents appear to be safe and modestly effective treatments in patients suffering from a variety of chronic pain conditions, including neuropathy (pain due to nerve damage), according to a literature review to be published in The Clinical Journal of Pain.

 

An investigator from New York University, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, conducted a PubMed search to survey the percentage of positive and negative published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing cannabinoids as treatments for pain. Of the 56 hits generated, 38 published RCTs met inclusion criteria. Of these, “71 percent (27) concluded that cannabinoids had empirically demonstrable and statistically significant pain relieving effects, whereas 29 percent (11) did not.”

 

Cannabinoids appeared to be most effective in treating hard-to-treat neuropathic pain conditions. “[F]or notoriously difficult to treat conditions such as HIV neuropathy, … cannabinergic pain medicines, particularly inhaled cannabinoid botanicals, are one of the only treatments that have been shown to be safe and effective with the highest levels of evidence,” the review states.

 

Five to ten percent of the US population is estimated to suffer from neuropathic pain at some point during their lives.

 

The study concludes, “Overall, based on the existing clinical trials database, cannabinergic pain medicines have been shown to be modestly effective and safe treatments in patients with a variety of chronic pain conditions. … Incorporating cannabinergic medicine topics into pain medicine education seems warranted and continuing clinical research and empiric treatment trials are appropriate.”

 

A separate paper, published in January in the Harm Reduction Journal, concluded: “Prescribing cannabis in place of opioids for neuropathic pain may reduce the morbidity and mortality rates associated with prescription pain medications and may be an effective harm reduction strategy.”

 

Full text of the study, “Cannabinergic pain medicine: A concise clinical primer and survey of randomized controlled trial results,” will appear in The Clinical Journal of Pain.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you so much for posting this. It is exactly what I have needed to send to my diabetic doc. I am really curious if they studied what the levels were and will report that info. I sure hope so it would give those that have neuropathy, I have it really bad, the needed info on what to look for in MM.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Studies like this always intrigue me... THE reason I was prescribed mmj was to treat severe and chronic nerve pain and muscle spasms which resulted from severe nerve damage on my right side from an injury I incurred while on active duty. MMJ is one of the few things I have tried that allows me to function without pain while still being able to function and has no ill effects (while on other pain killers, stomach pain, nausea, headaches were everyday occurances).

Edited by MyExitEmergency
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Studies like this always intrigue me... THE reason I was prescribed mmj was to treat severe and chronic nerve pain and muscle spasms which resulted from severe nerve damage on my right side from an injury I incurred while on active duty. MMJ is one of the few things I have tried that allows me to function without pain while still being able to function and has no ill effects (while on other pain killers, stomach pain, nausea, headaches where everyday occurances).

First off I thank you for your service to our country and I am so sorry to hear you were injured. I have MS so fully understand the physical pain and spasms you suffer with. That is the same reason why I was recommended to use MM along with other pain issues. I can not stand the narcotics that are used to treat us and the side effects that go along with them.

 

Would you mind telling me where I can find the link where they post these studies? I would love to stay up to date. TIA

 

Edit I am sorry I goofed, the last part has nothing to do with you. :huh:

Edited by restlesslegs
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Restless,

 

I cannot find a link to the actual study. All I can find are news postings that quote the Hartz dot com article I posted above. The Israeli's are way ahead of us in the cannabis research department, though. Jewish Hospital in Jerusalem, I belive has also done a study or two on cannabis.

 

It seems like someone was looking at the neuro-protective properties in spinal cord and brain injuries.

 

Anyway, sorry I couldn't find the study, but here is another news report from Hartz, Isreali Govt officially recognizes medical use:

 

My link

 

 

 

Animal

 

Thank you kindly for looking for me :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well in other countries doctors make money by educating their patients about good health. Here we only treat the symptoms of a condition with dangerous chemicals that cause other conditions that they can then treat with more dangerous chemicals, and soon you're far worse off than when you started. Natural is best.

 

I feel sorry for the people that run for the cure, walk for the cure, bike for the cure, there will never be a cure. They learned that with polio and it will never happen again. 2012 and they can't even cure jock itch.

 

No profit in curing diseases but mega profits in research & treatment. We must each be personally responsible for our own health and well being.

 

 

 

Peace & Health. :rock:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well in other countries doctors make money by educating their patients about good health. Here we only treat the symptoms of a condition with dangerous chemicals that cause other conditions that they can then treat with more dangerous chemicals, and soon you're far worse off than when you started. Natural is best.

 

I feel sorry for the people that run for the cure, walk for the cure, bike for the cure, there will never be a cure. They learned that with polio and it will never happen again. 2012 and they can't even cure jock itch.

 

No profit in curing diseases but mega profits in research & treatment. We must each be personally responsible for our own health and well being.

 

 

 

Peace & Health. :rock:

 

Stem cell research in other countries is so much more advanced then we are and to me it is such a shame this isn't utilized to it's full potential.

 

May I ask what your neuropathy is caused from?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Thank you so much for posting this. It is exactly what I have needed to send to my diabetic doc. I am really curious if they studied what the levels were and will report that info. I sure hope so it would give those that have neuropathy, I have it really bad, the needed info on what to look for in MM.

 

Try a medline search using "cannabinoid" and "neuropathy". You may have to register to use medline. There's quite a few recent articles about the topic. Here's an example of one of the results. You could visit a local academic library and se if they have the journal available. Maybe photocopy it for your physician. If you go through the abstract slowly and look up the words you aren't familiar with, you can basically translate it for yourself, but just as a brief note, this particular article confirms that the active ingredients of cannabis help prevent chronic pain and spasms by interfering with the development of those symptoms by glial cells... the support cells of the nervous system that wrap up the nerve cells.

 

 

Cannabinoid agonist WIN 55,212-2 prevents the development of paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy in rats. Possible involvement of spinal glial cells.

Eur J Pharmacol. 2012; 682(1-3):62-72 (ISSN: 1879-0712)

 

Burgos E; Gómez-Nicola D; Pascual D; Martín MI; Nieto-Sampedro M; Goicoechea C

Department of Pharmacology and Nutrition, Faculty of Health Sciences, Rey Juan Carlos University, 28922 Alcorcón, Madrid, Spain.

 

Spinal glial activation contributes to the development and maintenance of chronic pain states, including neuropathic pain of diverse etiologies. Cannabinoid compounds have shown antinociceptive properties in a variety of neuropathic pain models and are emerging as a promising class of drugs to treat neuropathic pain. Thus, the effects of repeated treatment with WIN 55,212-2, a synthetic cannabinoid agonist, were examined throughout the development of paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy. Painful neuropathy was induced in male Wistar rats by intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of paclitaxel (1mg/kg) on four alternate days. Paclitaxel-treated animals received WIN 55,212-2 (1mg/kg, i.p.) or minocycline (15mg/kg, i.p.), a microglial inhibitor, daily for 14days, simultaneous with the antineoplastic. The development of hypersensitive behaviors was assessed on days 1, 7, 14, 21 and 28 following the initial administration of drugs. Both the activation of glial cells (microglia and astrocytes) at day 29 and the time course of proinflammatory cytokine release within the spinal cord were also determined. Similar to minocycline, repeated administration of WIN 55,212-2 prevented the development of thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in paclitaxel-treated rats. WIN 55,212-2 treatment also prevented spinal microglial and astrocytic activation evoked by paclitaxel at day 29 and attenuated the early production of spinal proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α). Our results confirm changes in the reactivity of glial cells during the development of peripheral neuropathy induced by paclitaxel and support a preventive effect of WIN 55,212-2, probably via glial cells reactivity inactivation, on the development of this neuropathy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...