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Time To Debunk - Commentary: Medical Marijuana – Time For Parents To Step In


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Time to DEBUNK - Commentary: Medical Marijuana – Time for Parents to Step In

 

Everything about this commentary is slanted and one sided toward the atypical uninformed law enforcement point of view.  Obviously expressing the worst side of medical cannabis, possible isolated incidents or exaggerated situations. I posted this in an effort to debunk the commentary, and utilize the insight of this community to respond to this rhetoric.  Please help by adding your comments, research and input to this thread with the ultimate goal of responding to the propaganda offered from this commentary. The challenge here is to address the premise of the concerns raised: 

"THE CHILDREN"- if you look back over the last 4 years, the opponents seem to pull this out in every debate or discussion. Well this needs to be addressed and debunked  To allow this kind of rhetoric to go unanswered leaves  Parents who are caregivers or patients, or who support medical cannabis in a vulnerable situation.  

For those interested in assisting, let us use this thread to debunk the rhetoric and paint a picture more accurate, honest and one that really addresses the issue. 

Here are a few topics to start with. 

 

1. cities that have medical cannabis laws have consistently reported a drop in crimes. 

Stats needed... 

 

2. The article addresses cannabis use among children, but fails to mention the prescription drug problem which statistics show is a much more widely abused drug, much more dangerous and on the rise amongst children and teens.  

(For example:  7 overdoses resulting in death for prescription drugs in livingston county high school this past year). ( stats needed ) 

 

Thank you in advance for any effort you can offer.  

 

http://www.drugfree.org/join-together/drugs/commentary-medical-marijuana-time-for-parents-to-step-in

 

By TRI Ken Winters PhD and Amelia Arria PhD | September 11, 2012 | 1 Comment | Filed in Drugs, Legislation & Parenting

 

To paraphrase a former First Lady, “What goes on in the White House is never as important as what goes on in your house.”

As the evidence mounts of the negative effects of medical marijuana laws in various states, it’s even more important for parents to recognize that marijuana needs to be on their parenting radar screen.

A Colorado study shows some of these impacts, where nearly 74 percent of a sample of teenagers receiving addiction treatment in that state told researchers they used medical marijuana that was recommended for someone else.

This news should be of no surprise because increased availability of marijuana is highly associated with increased use. Studies have shown that marijuana is not a safe, benign drug. It’s a highly addictive drug. When smoked it contributes to pulmonary damage. It significantly impairs judgment, and is associated with poor performance in school. Its use has also been linked to contributions to impairment on important measures of life achievement, including physical and mental health, cognitive abilities, social life and career status.

Marijuana is a drug that’s widely used by teens and young adults. Among teens aged 12 to 17, according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, after several years of declines, current marijuana use increased in 2009 and again in 2010, to 7.4 percent of the population. Among young adults aged 18 to 25, almost 30 percent used marijuana in the past year, with almost 6.3 million young adult users in the past month.

Marijuana use is now more prevalent among teens than cigarette smoking. Marijuana smoke contains 50-70 percent more carcinogenic hydrocarbons than tobacco smoke. Moreover, the typical weed available to adolescents these days is so much more potent compared to the marijuana used by prior generations. This increased potency is particularly concerning in light of recent scientific findings that marijuana use deleteriously affects brain development, particularly in areas related to mood, reward, and learning.

Medical marijuana laws have made parents’ jobs tougher, no doubt about it. Although the provisions of the statutes differ, as of early July medical marijuana statutes had been signed into law in 17 states and the District of Columbia.

Parents are a mighty lobbying force – at the local, state and national levels – particularly when they act in groups. We are not suggesting that parents shouldn’t try to influence government at any one of these levels.

But because governments move slowly and not always in everyone’s best interests, parents can (and should) influence what goes on in their households. Science will continue to inform the public and seek solutions. But as the constant in a child’s life – with protective instincts that can be brought out by science but not replaced – it’s the parents who are the first lines of defense for their children.

 

Ken C. Winters, PhD & Amelia Arria, PhD

Dr. Winters is the Associate Director, Dr. Arria the Scientific Director, of the Parents Translational Research Center (PTRC) of the Philadelphia-based Treatment Research Institute. The PTRC is a NIDA-funded Center dedicated to developing practical, science-based tools for parents and other caregivers faced with challenges related to adolescent substance abuse.

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http://vitals.nbcnews.com/_news/2012/06/19/12302218-study-legalizing-medical-pot-doesnt-boost-teen-drug-use?lite

 

In fact, slight drops in teen use were seen in some states where marijuana was legalized.

 

http://norml.org/news/2009/11/12/dutch-marijuana-use-lower-than-european-average-study-says

According to the 2009 annual report, entitled "The State of the Drugs Problem in Europe," among adults in the Netherlands, 5.4 percent are cannabis users, compared with the European average of 6.8 percent.

 

http://www.eastbayexpress.com/LegalizationNation/archives/2011/09/22/going-dutch-teen-marijuana-use-in-the-us-vs-netherlands-the-full-interview-with-cal-professor-robert-maccoun

The results: The Dutch have about 700 adults-only clubs that sell 50 to 150 metric tons of cannabis per year, yet Dutch teens report lower levels of weed usage and availability than youth in the United States.

 

the thread is a good idea, it would also be great if you made this info into a simple infographic. like 'legalizing marijuana to keep kids from using marijuana'.

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Which is a bigger threat ? Alcohol its legal, is associated with good times, partying. Cigarettes, legal, promote self image... Last but not least, pharmaceuticals, usually highly addictive, available, more acceptable. The usual suspects: Heroin, cocaine, crack, meth, etc. highly addictive, available.

 

Cannabis is NOT physically addictive.

 

Therefore any increased interest in Cannabis should be construed as a good thing. The other alternative to addictive drugs: Cannabis. Can we be honest with our children? Not about Santa Clause, the Easter Bunny or the Tooth Fairy, but the Grim Reaper ! Might serve them better.

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Time to DEBUNK - Commentary: Medical Marijuana – Time for Parents to Step In

 

Everything about this commentary is slanted and one sided toward the atypical uninformed law enforcement point of view. Obviously expressing the worst side of medical cannabis, possible isolated incidents or exaggerated situations. I posted this in an effort to debunk the commentary, and utilize the insight of this community to respond to this rhetoric. Please help by adding your comments, research and input to this thread with the ultimate goal of responding to the propaganda offered from this commentary. The challenge here is to address the premise of the concerns raised:

"THE CHILDREN"- if you look back over the last 4 years, the opponents seem to pull this out in every debate or discussion. Well this needs to be addressed and debunked To allow this kind of rhetoric to go unanswered leaves Parents who are caregivers or patients, or who support medical cannabis in a vulnerable situation.

For those interested in assisting, let us use this thread to debunk the rhetoric and paint a picture more accurate, honest and one that really addresses the issue.

Here are a few topics to start with.

 

1. cities that have medical cannabis laws have consistently reported a drop in crimes.

Stats needed...

 

2. The article addresses cannabis use among children, but fails to mention the prescription drug problem which statistics show is a much more widely abused drug, much more dangerous and on the rise amongst children and teens.

(For example: 7 overdoses resulting in death for prescription drugs in livingston county high school this past year). ( stats needed )

 

Thank you in advance for any effort you can offer.

 

http://www.drugfree....ents-to-step-in

 

By TRI Ken Winters PhD and Amelia Arria PhD | September 11, 2012 | 1 Comment | Filed in Drugs, Legislation & Parenting

 

To paraphrase a former First Lady, “What goes on in the White House is never as important as what goes on in your house.” First of all, they have any business in my castle - stay the h--l out.

As the evidence mounts of the negative effects of medical marijuana laws in various states, it’s even more important for parents to recognize that marijuana needs to be on their parenting radar screen.

A Colorado study shows some of these impacts, where nearly 74 percent of a sample of teenagers receiving addiction treatment in that state told researchers they used medical marijuana that was recommended for someone else.

This news should be of no surprise because increased availability of marijuana is highly associated with increased use. Studies have shown that marijuana is not a safe, benign drug. It’s a highly addictive drug. When smoked it contributes to pulmonary damage. It significantly impairs judgment, and is associated with poor performance in school. Its use has also been linked to contributions to impairment on important measures of life achievement, including physical and mental health, cognitive abilities, social life and career status.

Marijuana is a drug that’s widely used by teens and young adults. Among teens aged 12 to 17, according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, after several years of declines, current marijuana use increased in 2009 and again in 2010, to 7.4 percent of the population. Among young adults aged 18 to 25, almost 30 percent used marijuana in the past year, with almost 6.3 million young adult users in the past month.

Marijuana use is now more prevalent among teens than cigarette smoking. Marijuana smoke contains 50-70 percent more carcinogenic hydrocarbons than tobacco smoke. Moreover, the typical weed available to adolescents these days is so much more potent compared to the marijuana used by prior generations. This increased potency is particularly concerning in light of recent scientific findings that marijuana use deleteriously affects brain development, particularly in areas related to mood, reward, and learning.

Medical marijuana laws have made parents’ jobs tougher (it didn't pose any significant problems to our family), no doubt about it. Although the provisions of the statutes differ, as of early July medical marijuana statutes had been signed into law in 17 states and the District of Columbia.

Parents are a mighty lobbying force – at the local, state and national levels – particularly when they act in groups. We are not suggesting that parents shouldn’t try to influence government at any one of these levels.

But because governments move slowly and not always in everyone’s best interests, parents can (and should) influence what goes on in their households. Science will continue to inform the public and seek solutions. But as the constant in a child’s life – with protective instincts that can be brought out by science but not replaced – it’s the parents who are the first lines of defense for their children.

 

Ken C. Winters, PhD & Amelia Arria, PhD

Dr. Winters is the Associate Director, Dr. Arria the Scientific Director, of the Parents Translational Research Center (PTRC) of the Philadelphia-based Treatment Research Institute. The PTRC is a NIDA-funded Center dedicated to developing practical, science-based tools for parents and other caregivers faced with challenges related to adolescent substance abuse.

 

I don't see many facts in this article. I highlighted several things that suggest they are fact, but, in fact they are not. Those are generic statements not backed up by any facts at all. They should have supported there claims with footnotes pointing to the supposed studies for people to review.

Edited by Herb Cannabis
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It would really be helpful if there were scientific studies to shed light on the ramifications of cannabis use, but unfortunately there aren't any because the government won't allow cannabis to be studied! So, what do prohibitionists do? They make stuff up and then attempt to pass it off as fact. Most of the claims that prohibitionists make are based on anecdotal evidence which, if it can't be used in court, shouldn't be used in position papers, editorials, or commentaries.

 

The people who published this paper - a pair of PhD's - should know better. They obviously have an agenda. It isn't clear to me what their agenda is however.

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"While the judiciary is the governmental institution most directly concerned with the protection of individual liberties, all policy-makers have a responsibility to consider our constitutional heritage when framing public policy. Regardless of whether or not the courts would overturn a prohibition of possession of marihuana for personal use in the home, we are necessarily influenced by the high place traditionally occupied by the value of privacy in our constitutional scheme.[/background]

 

Accordingly, we believe that government must show a compelling reason to justify invasion of the home in order to prevent personal use of marihuana. We find little in marihuana's effects or in its social impact to support such a determination. Legislators enacting Prohibition did not find such a compelling reason 40 years ago; and we do not find the situation any more compelling for marihuana today. ...

 

In short, personal possession arrests and even casual sales, which account for more than 95% of the marihuana arrests at the state local level, occur too low in the chain of distribution to diminish supply very effectively.

.

In addition to the misallocation of enforcement resources, another consequence of prohibition against possession for personal use is the social cost of criminalizing large numbers of users. Our empirical study of enforcement of state and federal marihuana laws indicates that almost all of those arrested are between the ages of 18 and 25, most have jobs or are in school, and most have had no prior contact -with the criminal justice system. The high social cost of stigmatizing such persons as criminals is now generally acknowledged by the public at large as well as by those in the criminal justice system."

These comments are from a comprehensive study that was completed in 1972 and completely ignored by the president , who commissioned the study. It was ignored then and continues to be ignored to this day.

The Report of the National Commission on Marihuana and Drug Abuse

 

Marihuana: A Signal of Misunderstanding

 

Commissioned by President Richard M. Nixon, March, 1972

http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer/library/studies/nc/ncmenu.htm[/background]

 

Regards and peace,

C

Edited by c2288420
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