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Governor Snyder signed a bill yesterday that will impose a 25 year minimum for fourth time offenders who commit a "violent" crime and have a qualifying prior offense.

 

The law can be found here: http://legislature.m...12-SNB-1109.htm

 

 

STATE OF MICHIGAN

96TH LEGISLATURE

REGULAR SESSION OF 2012

Introduced by Senators Jones, Brandenburg, Pappageorge, Hildenbrand, Rocca and Schuitmaker

 

ENROLLED SENATE BILL No. 1109

AN ACT to amend 1927 PA 175, entitled “An act to revise, consolidate, and codify the laws relating to criminal procedure and to define the jurisdiction, powers, and duties of courts, judges, and other officers of the court under the provisions of this act; to provide laws relative to the rights of persons accused of criminal offenses and ordinance violations; to provide for the arrest of persons charged with or suspected of criminal offenses and ordinance violations; to provide for bail of persons arrested for or accused of criminal offenses and ordinance violations; to provide for the examination of persons accused of criminal offenses; to regulate the procedure relative to grand juries, indictments, informations, and proceedings before trial; to provide for trials of persons complained of or indicted for criminal offenses and ordinance violations and to provide for the procedure in those trials; to provide for judgments and sentences of persons convicted of criminal offenses and ordinance violations; to establish a sentencing commission and to prescribe its powers and duties; to provide for procedure relating to new trials and appeals in criminal and ordinance violation cases; to provide a uniform system of probation throughout this state and the appointment of probation officers; to prescribe the powers, duties, and compensation of probation officers; to provide penalties for the violation of the duties of probation officers; to provide for procedure governing proceedings to prevent crime and proceedings for the discovery of crime; to provide for fees of officers, witnesses, and others in criminal and ordinance violation cases; to set forth miscellaneous provisions as to criminal procedure in certain cases; to provide penalties for the violation of certain provisions of this act; and to repeal all acts and parts of acts inconsistent with or contravening any of the provisions of this act,” by amending section 12 of chapter IX (MCL 769.12), as amended by 2006 PA 655.

The People of the State of Michigan enact:

CHAPTER IX

Sec. 12. (1) If a person has been convicted of any combination of 3 or more felonies or attempts to commit felonies, whether the convictions occurred in this state or would have been for felonies or attempts to commit felonies in this state if obtained in this state, and that person commits a subsequent felony within this state, the person shall be punished upon conviction of the subsequent felony and sentencing under section 13 of this chapter as follows:

(a) If the subsequent felony is a serious crime or a conspiracy to commit a serious crime, and 1 or more of the prior felony convictions are listed prior felonies, the court shall sentence the person to imprisonment for not less than 25 years. Not more than 1 conviction arising out of the same transaction shall be considered a prior felony conviction for the purposes of this subsection only.

(b) If the subsequent felony is punishable upon a first conviction by imprisonment for a maximum term of 5 years or more or for life, the court, except as otherwise provided in this section or section 1 of chapter XI, may sentence the person to imprisonment for life or for a lesser term.

© If the subsequent felony is punishable upon a first conviction by imprisonment for a maximum term that is less than 5 years, the court, except as otherwise provided in this section or section 1 of chapter XI, may sentence the person to imprisonment for a maximum term of not more than 15 years.

(d) If the subsequent felony is a major controlled substance offense, the person shall be punished as provided by part 74 of the public health code, 1978 PA 368, MCL 333.7401 to 333.7461.

(2) If the court imposes a sentence of imprisonment for any term of years under this section, the court shall fix the length of both the minimum and maximum sentence within any specified limits in terms of years or a fraction of a year, and the sentence so imposed shall be considered an indeterminate sentence. The court shall not fix a maximum sentence that is less than the maximum term for a first conviction.

(3) A conviction shall not be used to enhance a sentence under this section if that conviction is used to enhance a sentence under a statute that prohibits use of the conviction for further enhancement under this section.

(4) An offender sentenced under this section or section 10 or 11 of this chapter for an offense other than a major controlled substance offense is not eligible for parole until expiration of the following:

(a) For a prisoner other than a prisoner subject to disciplinary time, the minimum term fixed by the sentencing judge at the time of sentence unless the sentencing judge or a successor gives written approval for parole at an earlier date authorized by law.

(b) For a prisoner subject to disciplinary time, the minimum term fixed by the sentencing judge.

(5) This section and sections 10 and 11 of this chapter are not in derogation of other provisions of law that permit or direct the imposition of a consecutive sentence for a subsequent felony.

(6) As used in this section:

(a) “Listed prior felony” means a violation or attempted violation of any of the following:

(i) Section 602a(4) or (5) or 625(4) of the Michigan vehicle code, 1949 PA 300, MCL 257.602a and 257.625.

(ii) Article 7 of the public health code, 1978 PA 368, MCL 333.7101 to 333.7545, that is punishable by imprisonment for more than 4 years.

(iii) Section 72, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 91, 110a(2) or (3), 136b(2) or (3), 145n(1) or (2), 157b, 197c, 226, 227, 234a, 234b, 234c, 317, 321, 329, 349, 349a, 350, 397, 411h(2)(b), 411i, 479a(4) or (5), 520b, 520c, 520d, 520g, 529, 529a, or 530 of the Michigan penal code, 1931 PA 328, MCL 750.72, 750.82, 750.83, 750.84, 750.85, 750.86, 750.87, 750.88, 750.89, 750.91, 750.110a, 750.136b, 750.145n, 750.157b, 750.197c, 750.226, 750.227, 750.234a, 750.234b, 750.234c, 750.317, 750.321, 750.329, 750.349, 750.349a, 750.350, 750.397, 750.411h, 750.411i, 750.479a, 750.520b, 750.520c, 750.520d, 750.520g, 750.529, 750.529a, and 750.530.

(iv) A second or subsequent violation or attempted violation of section 227b of the Michigan penal code, 1931 PA 328, MCL 750.227b.

(v) Section 2a of 1968 PA 302, MCL 752.542a.

(b) “Prisoner subject to disciplinary time” means that term as defined in section 34 of 1893 PA 118, MCL 800.34.

© “Serious crime” means an offense against a person in violation of section 83, 84, 86, 88, 89, 317, 321, 349, 349a, 350, 397, 520b, 520c, 520d, 520g(1), 529, or 529a of the Michigan penal code, 1931 PA 328, MCL 750.83, 750.84, 750.86, 750.88, 750.89, 750.317, 750.321, 750.349, 750.349a, 750.350, 750.397, 750.520b, 750.520c, 750.520d, 750.520g, 750.529, and 750.529a.

Enacting section 1. This amendatory act takes effect October 1, 2012.

This act is ordered to take immediate effect.

Secretary of the Senate

Clerk of the House of Representatives

Approved

Governor

 

 

 

Michael A. Komorn

 

Attorney and Counselor

 

Law Office of Michael A. Komorn

 

3000 Town Center, Suite, 1800

 

Southfield, MI 48075

 

800-656-3557 (Toll Free)

 

248-351-2200 (Office)

 

248-357-2550 (Phone)

 

248-351-2211 (Fax)

 

 

 

Email: michael@komornlaw.com

 

Website: www.komornlaw.com

 

 

 

Check out our Radio show:

 

http://www.blogtalkr...lanetgreentrees

 

CALL IN NUMBER: (347) 326-9626

 

Live Every Thursday 8-10:00p.m.

 

 

 

PLANET GREENTREES

 

w/ Attorney Michael Komorn

 

 

 

The most relevant radio talk show for the Michigan Medical Marijuana Community. PERIOD.

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Hi,

Senate Bills 877-878 and House Bills 5174-5177 are the flip side of this legislation IMHO.

 

http://www.mlive.com/politics/index.ssf/2012/03/are_private_prisons_michigans.html

 

Governor Snyder is continuing Governor Engler's work. (To save taxpayer money, Gov. John Engler signed contract with a GEO to build and operate what he called the "punk prison” in Baldwin. It was “time to stop pampering punks who rape, murder and assault law-abiding citizens,” Engler said at the ground-breaking.) California is a perfect example of how mandatory sentences workIMHO. I could be wrong but, some contractors want "...a guarantee from the states that each facility would maintain 90 percent occupancy". Lock them up and send the taxpayers the bill! Sadly, we have the best legislatures that money can buy.

 

Regards and peace,

C

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      Michael A. Komorn
      Attorney and Counselor
      Law Office of Michael A. Komorn
      3000 Town Center, Suite, 1800
      Southfield, MI 48075
      800-656-3557 (Toll Free)
      248-351-2200 (Office)
      248-357-2550 (Phone)
      (855) 456-6676: (Fax)
       
      Email: michael@komornlaw.com
      Website: www.komornlaw.com
       
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      CALL IN NUMBER: (347) 326-9626
      Live Every Thursday 8-10:00p.m.


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