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Cannatonic #4, AC/DC, Harlequin, and others are real high in CBD and under 1% THC. Some dispensaries in AA carry the Cannatonic.

 

Also, place in AA has Star Tonic which is 15% CBD and 10% THC. Might be too much though.

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I recently made a topical for a patient with psoriasis. Two grams of highly refined cannabis oil to 18 grams emu oil. Yikes that emu oil is expensive. The patient reported positive results, but he also said "I've heard that emu oil is good stuff, but I've always been too cheap to buy it." I should have had him try plain emu oil for comparison.

 

I like the emu oil much better for topical than coconut oil. Coconut oil is a solid at room temperature, but it melts around 76 degrees or so. I've had great success with coconut oil/cannabis capsules as edibles.

 

I have wanted to try echinacea as an additive for a while too. Echinacea (purple coneflower) has a history as a traditional medicine in the US and Europe and was widely used to battle infection and was also said to be good for inflammation as well as a number of other issues. There was an obscure study in Australia about 5 years ago that what amount to a cannabinoid was found in the echinacea plant. I naturally assumed for a long time that this was PB's secret ingredient. Has anyone tried echinacea?

 

Why do you like bird fat over coconut oil?  I didn't comprehend your reasoning.

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Why do you like bird fat over coconut oil?  I didn't comprehend your reasoning.

 

Quick overview of why emu oil over coconut oil.

 

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/315535.php

 

An emu is a flightless bird, scientifically named Dromaius novaehallandiae. The bird is native to Australia, but is now found in many countries because of a rising popularity of nutritious emu meat and medicinal emu oil.

 

Emu oil itself is a bright yellow liquid, made up of mostly fat, which is collected from the deposits below the skin of the bird. Once the fats are collected, they are passed through various filters and processes until pure oil is produced. It is a widely available commercial product with some unique benefits.

 

There are also different types of emu oil, based on different levels of filtration and processing. Most emu oils will go through full processing in order to reduce bacteria and contaminants. Some emu oils are refined more than others in order to create higher contents of fatty acids.

 

Organizations such as the American Emu Association have certification programs that aim to ensure that the emu oil people buy is pure, and that the emus enjoyed the best possible lives. Completely pure emu oil will always be fully refined and is the type of emu oil studied for its beneficial effects.

 

Uses and health benefits

 

The use of emu oil originates from the Australian Aborigine culture. According to their oral history, emu oil has been used for over 40,000 years. The oil has been used to relieve minor aches and pains, help wounds heal quicker, and protect skin from the elements.

 

The Aborigines first introduced emu oil into European culture as a natural sunscreen and moisturizer. European settlers soon adopted the use of emu oil and many other natural remedies that the Aborigines provided. Since then, people have discovered many more benefits to emu oil.

 

Anti-inflammatory

 

The most popular benefit of emu oil is its use as an anti-inflammatory. In a review posted to the journal Nutrition, researchers noted that the potent anti-inflammatory effect of emu oil may be beneficial in treating conditions like ear inflammation, inflammatory bowel syndrome, and even prevent bone loss induced by chemotherapy.

Emu oil is also popular with massage therapists, who use it to help treat people with arthritis.

 

Enhancing skin moisture and absorption

 

The skin easily absorbs emu oil. This can help lock in skin moisture, making the skin less prone to cracking or drying out. Emu oil is often suggested for the dry skin associated with cancer radiation.It appears that emu oil can pass this absorbable trait on to other compounds when they are mixed together. This property may explain why emu oil is regularly mixed into moisturizers containing other helpful compounds.

 

Stimulating the skin

 

The research also signals that applying emu oil to the skin may help increase the number of healthy skin cells. Emu oil stimulates the skin to reduce the appearance of skin wrinkles, and rejuvenate aging or sun-damaged skin.

Emu oil has also been recommended for use in the treatment of skin conditions like alopecia, rosacea, hypopigmentation, shingles, and dermatitis.

 

Healing wounds

 

Because of its painkilling effect, antioxidant levels, and ability to reach deep into the skin, emu oil can be applied to small wounds, cuts, bruises, or burns. It can help ease the pain of minor wounds, and the antioxidants may help protect the skin from additional damage.

 

Bug repellant

 

Applying emu oil to the skin before heading outdoors can actually help repel insects. This is partly due to substances called terpenes found in the oil. Many insects are disoriented or repelled by

terpenes, and putting the oil on exposed skin can keep bugs at bay.

 

Reducing cholesterol

 

When taken orally, emu oil may actually reduce cholesterol in the body. Researchers found that when compared to olive oil, subjects who were fed emu oil had significantly reduced cholesterol levels. More trials are needed to substantiate these claims, but the results are promising.

 

Treating ulcers

According to some research posted to Pharmacy Today, emu oil may also help treat ulcers.

In people who had ulcers, applications of various levels of emu oil had a protective effect. In some cases, the oil even reduced the size of the ulcers.

 

Breast sensitivity

According to a peer review posted to Nutrition, emu oil may also reduce the breast sensitivity common in breastfeeding mothers.

When newborns latch onto the breast, some women may experience pain caused by an improper latch. This can result in soreness, engorgement, cracked and dry skin, and pain. These symptoms may be severe enough to cause some new mothers to stop breastfeeding.

Researchers found that when breastfeeding mothers used an emu-based cream for a 24-hour period beginning soon after delivery, the breast areola and nipple skin was more hydrated.

Before feeding her baby, a woman should wipe her nipple and breast with a warm cloth to remove any residual oil. This is because emu oil has not been proven safe for infants and children to ingest.

 

How does emu oil work?

 

While many topical creams claim to be effective for dry skin, arthritis, and inflammation, most creams and lotions are made up of large particles that cannot penetrate the skin. However, emu oil is made up of smaller particles, which allows it to carry many healthful compounds to deep layers of the skin.

 

Emu oil contains high amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), antioxidants, and compounds, including:

  • Essential fatty acids: Emu oil is high in omega-3, omega 6, and omega-9 fatty acids. These help reduce inflammation, ease muscular pain, and arthritic joint pain. They may also help relieve signs of wrinkles, scars, and blemishes by nourishing the skin cells.
  • Vitamin A: An antioxidant and essential nutrient, vitamin A is an excellent skin tonic.
  • Additional compounds like carotenoids, flavones, polyphenols, tocopherol, and phospholipids.

It also increases the pores through the skin barrier and allows for deeper absorption and can act as a carrier for increased absorption of other oils etc.

 

 

 

Side effects, risks, and considerations

 

Emu oil is a natural product and there are few documented side effects. Some people may experience skin irritation when applying emu oil directly to the skin as a topical ointment. To prevent this, a person should apply a small amount of emu oil to a small patch of skin, such as the back of one hand. If an allergic reaction occurs, they should stop using the oil.

It may also be important to consider the source of the emu oil. Emus thrive when they have plenty of room to roam and are able to eat a rich diet. Low-quality living conditions may result in inferior quality oil. It is best to buy oil from a reputable source, especially as the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) do not regulate its production.

Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding should talk to their doctor before taking emu oil by mouth. It is important to consult a doctor about the possible uses of emu oil and if it will affect a pregnancy.

----

 

Also,

 

 

Emu oil is taken by mouth for improving cholesterol levels, as a source of polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fatty acids, for weight loss, and as a cough syrup for colds, H1N1 (swine) flu, and flu.

 

Some people apply emu oil to the skin for relief from sore muscles, aching joints, pain or inflammation, carpal tunnel syndrome, sciatica, shin splints, and gout. It is also used topically to improve healing of wounds, cuts, and burns from radiation therapy; to reduce bruises and stretch marks; to reduce scarring and keloids; to heal surgical wounds caused by removing skin for skin grafts; to reduce redness due to acne; and to soften dry cuticles and promote healthy nails. Emu oil is also used topically for athlete's foot; diaper rash; canker sores; chapped lips; poor circulation; and skin conditions, including cancer, dry skin, dandruff, eczema, psoriasis, wrinkles or age spots. It is also used to protect skin from sun damage and to promote more youthful looking skin.

 

Emu oil is also applied to the skin to reduce pain and irritation from shingles, bedsores, hemorrhoids, diabetic nerve pain, insect bites, earaches, eye irritation, "growing pains," and frostbite. It is used for rashes, razor burn, and nicks.

 

Some massage therapists apply emu oil to clients’ skin as part of their treatment.

 

Some people put emu oil inside the nose to treat colds and flu.

 

Emu oil (7%) is used in combination with glycolic acid (10%) for lowering blood fats including triglycerides, and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol; preventing and treating allergies; preventing scarring; treating headaches, especially migraines; preventing nosebleeds; treating and preventing cold and flu symptoms; and relieving discomfort associated with menstruation.

 

In veterinary practice, emu oil is used to reduce swelling in joints, prevent cracked or peeling paws, calm "hot spots," and reduce irritation of flea bites.

 

In manufacturing, emu oil is used to sharpen and oil industrial machinery, for polishing timber and leather, and for conditioning and waterproofing.

 

 

How does it work?

Emu oil contains chemicals called fatty acids that might reduce pain and swelling (inflammation). There is some evidence that emu oil might work better for sudden (acute) inflammation than for ongoing (chronic) inflammation.

 

When emu oil is applied to the skin, it has moisturizing and cosmetic properties that resemble mineral oil.

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Why do you like bird fat over coconut oil?  I didn't comprehend your reasoning.

 

 

I think the question is "why would you ever use coconut oil over emu oil?"

 

post-31484-0-16993000-1495519438.gif

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I think the question is "why would you ever use coconut oil over emu oil?"

 

attachicon.gifguy.gif

maybe im vegan

 

I saw the original claim previously about it allowing better efficiency through the skin and I wonder the truth to that claim.  I'm just a very knowledge curious individual.  EMU oil is new to me.

Edited by garyfisher

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How does it work?

Emu oil contains chemicals called fatty acids that might reduce pain and swelling (inflammation). There is some evidence that emu oil might work better for sudden (acute) inflammation than for ongoing (chronic) inflammation.

Are fatty acids something exclusive to EMU oil?

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If you're too dumb to figure it out for yourself, why should I spend the time answering such stupid questions from someone who actually isn't interested but just wanted controversy.?

 

There is this thing called Google,.... it's amazing.  Try it sometime.

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If you're too dumb to figure it out for yourself, why should I spend the time answering such stupid questions from someone who actually isn't interested but just wanted controversy.?

 

There is this thing called Google,.... it's amazing.  Try it sometime.

 

Wow mal, really?

People come here for information and discussions.

Why bother being here if you do not want to "spend time answering stupid questions..."?

What an insult to gary and all readers.

 

This kind of attitude is why I rarely come here anymore.

Shameful.

 

On a personal note; Emu oil is uber expensive and in my research I find no conclusive

evidence that it is worthy of the extra cost.  I also prefer not to smear bird fat on my skin.

I'll stick with coconut oil for the win.

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I'm going to let my donkey talk. My donkey says that emu oil is a great delivery product to penetrate the skin and also take various dissolved products (cannabis) along for the ride. Coconut oil doesn't have the same properties.

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Why do you like bird fat over coconut oil?  I didn't comprehend your reasoning.

Because emu oil penetrates the skin and is a great carrier for other compounds. (Other compounds = cannabis oil for the purposes of this discussion).

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How does bird fat improve the efficiency of transdermal absorption?

Doesn't really matter that much as the story goes. Try a few and see what works turns out to be the best advice. Some are a little quicker. Some have extra qualities that help some people. You would have to google the reports and sort it out, or trial and error. 

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Wow mal, really?

People come here for information and discussions.

Why bother being here if you do not want to "spend time answering stupid questions..."?

What an insult to gary and all readers.

 

This kind of attitude is why I rarely come here anymore.

Shameful.

 

On a personal note; Emu oil is uber expensive and in my research I find no conclusive

evidence that it is worthy of the extra cost.  I also prefer not to smear bird fat on my skin.

I'll stick with coconut oil for the win.

 

 

I posted this:

 

 

 

Quick overview of why emu oil over coconut oil.

 

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/315535.php

 

An emu is a flightless bird, scientifically named Dromaius novaehallandiae. The bird is native to Australia, but is now found in many countries because of a rising popularity of nutritious emu meat and medicinal emu oil.

 

Emu oil itself is a bright yellow liquid, made up of mostly fat, which is collected from the deposits below the skin of the bird. Once the fats are collected, they are passed through various filters and processes until pure oil is produced. It is a widely available commercial product with some unique benefits.

 

There are also different types of emu oil, based on different levels of filtration and processing. Most emu oils will go through full processing in order to reduce bacteria and contaminants. Some emu oils are refined more than others in order to create higher contents of fatty acids.

 

Organizations such as the American Emu Association have certification programs that aim to ensure that the emu oil people buy is pure, and that the emus enjoyed the best possible lives. Completely pure emu oil will always be fully refined and is the type of emu oil studied for its beneficial effects.

 

Uses and health benefits

 

The use of emu oil originates from the Australian Aborigine culture. According to their oral history, emu oil has been used for over 40,000 years. The oil has been used to relieve minor aches and pains, help wounds heal quicker, and protect skin from the elements.

 

The Aborigines first introduced emu oil into European culture as a natural sunscreen and moisturizer. European settlers soon adopted the use of emu oil and many other natural remedies that the Aborigines provided. Since then, people have discovered many more benefits to emu oil.

 

Anti-inflammatory

 

The most popular benefit of emu oil is its use as an anti-inflammatory. In a review posted to the journal Nutrition, researchers noted that the potent anti-inflammatory effect of emu oil may be beneficial in treating conditions like ear inflammation, inflammatory bowel syndrome, and even prevent bone loss induced by chemotherapy.

Emu oil is also popular with massage therapists, who use it to help treat people with arthritis.

 

Enhancing skin moisture and absorption

 

The skin easily absorbs emu oil. This can help lock in skin moisture, making the skin less prone to cracking or drying out. Emu oil is often suggested for the dry skin associated with cancer radiation.It appears that emu oil can pass this absorbable trait on to other compounds when they are mixed together. This property may explain why emu oil is regularly mixed into moisturizers containing other helpful compounds.

 

Stimulating the skin

 

The research also signals that applying emu oil to the skin may help increase the number of healthy skin cells. Emu oil stimulates the skin to reduce the appearance of skin wrinkles, and rejuvenate aging or sun-damaged skin.

Emu oil has also been recommended for use in the treatment of skin conditions like alopecia, rosacea, hypopigmentation, shingles, and dermatitis.

 

Healing wounds

 

Because of its painkilling effect, antioxidant levels, and ability to reach deep into the skin, emu oil can be applied to small wounds, cuts, bruises, or burns. It can help ease the pain of minor wounds, and the antioxidants may help protect the skin from additional damage.

 

Bug repellant

 

Applying emu oil to the skin before heading outdoors can actually help repel insects. This is partly due to substances called terpenes found in the oil. Many insects are disoriented or repelled by

terpenes, and putting the oil on exposed skin can keep bugs at bay.

 

Reducing cholesterol

 

When taken orally, emu oil may actually reduce cholesterol in the body. Researchers found that when compared to olive oil, subjects who were fed emu oil had significantly reduced cholesterol levels. More trials are needed to substantiate these claims, but the results are promising.

 

Treating ulcers

According to some research posted to Pharmacy Today, emu oil may also help treat ulcers.

In people who had ulcers, applications of various levels of emu oil had a protective effect. In some cases, the oil even reduced the size of the ulcers.

 

Breast sensitivity

According to a peer review posted to Nutrition, emu oil may also reduce the breast sensitivity common in breastfeeding mothers.

When newborns latch onto the breast, some women may experience pain caused by an improper latch. This can result in soreness, engorgement, cracked and dry skin, and pain. These symptoms may be severe enough to cause some new mothers to stop breastfeeding.

Researchers found that when breastfeeding mothers used an emu-based cream for a 24-hour period beginning soon after delivery, the breast areola and nipple skin was more hydrated.

Before feeding her baby, a woman should wipe her nipple and breast with a warm cloth to remove any residual oil. This is because emu oil has not been proven safe for infants and children to ingest.

 

How does emu oil work?

 

While many topical creams claim to be effective for dry skin, arthritis, and inflammation, most creams and lotions are made up of large particles that cannot penetrate the skin. However, emu oil is made up of smaller particles, which allows it to carry many healthful compounds to deep layers of the skin.

 

Emu oil contains high amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), antioxidants, and compounds, including:

  • Essential fatty acids: Emu oil is high in omega-3, omega 6, and omega-9 fatty acids. These help reduce inflammation, ease muscular pain, and arthritic joint pain. They may also help relieve signs of wrinkles, scars, and blemishes by nourishing the skin cells.
  • Vitamin A: An antioxidant and essential nutrient, vitamin A is an excellent skin tonic.
  • Additional compounds like carotenoids, flavones, polyphenols, tocopherol, and phospholipids.

It also increases the pores through the skin barrier and allows for deeper absorption and can act as a carrier for increased absorption of other oils etc.

 

 

 

Side effects, risks, and considerations

 

Emu oil is a natural product and there are few documented side effects. Some people may experience skin irritation when applying emu oil directly to the skin as a topical ointment. To prevent this, a person should apply a small amount of emu oil to a small patch of skin, such as the back of one hand. If an allergic reaction occurs, they should stop using the oil.

It may also be important to consider the source of the emu oil. Emus thrive when they have plenty of room to roam and are able to eat a rich diet. Low-quality living conditions may result in inferior quality oil. It is best to buy oil from a reputable source, especially as the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) do not regulate its production.

Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding should talk to their doctor before taking emu oil by mouth. It is important to consult a doctor about the possible uses of emu oil and if it will affect a pregnancy.

----

 

Also,

 

 

Emu oil is taken by mouth for improving cholesterol levels, as a source of polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fatty acids, for weight loss, and as a cough syrup for colds, H1N1 (swine) flu, and flu.

 

Some people apply emu oil to the skin for relief from sore muscles, aching joints, pain or inflammation, carpal tunnel syndrome, sciatica, shin splints, and gout. It is also used topically to improve healing of wounds, cuts, and burns from radiation therapy; to reduce bruises and stretch marks; to reduce scarring and keloids; to heal surgical wounds caused by removing skin for skin grafts; to reduce redness due to acne; and to soften dry cuticles and promote healthy nails. Emu oil is also used topically for athlete's foot; diaper rash; canker sores; chapped lips; poor circulation; and skin conditions, including cancer, dry skin, dandruff, eczema, psoriasis, wrinkles or age spots. It is also used to protect skin from sun damage and to promote more youthful looking skin.

 

Emu oil is also applied to the skin to reduce pain and irritation from shingles, bedsores, hemorrhoids, diabetic nerve pain, insect bites, earaches, eye irritation, "growing pains," and frostbite. It is used for rashes, razor burn, and nicks.

 

Some massage therapists apply emu oil to clients’ skin as part of their treatment.

 

Some people put emu oil inside the nose to treat colds and flu.

 

Emu oil (7%) is used in combination with glycolic acid (10%) for lowering blood fats including triglycerides, and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol; preventing and treating allergies; preventing scarring; treating headaches, especially migraines; preventing nosebleeds; treating and preventing cold and flu symptoms; and relieving discomfort associated with menstruation.

 

In veterinary practice, emu oil is used to reduce swelling in joints, prevent cracked or peeling paws, calm "hot spots," and reduce irritation of flea bites.

 

In manufacturing, emu oil is used to sharpen and oil industrial machinery, for polishing timber and leather, and for conditioning and waterproofing.

 

How does it work?

Emu oil contains chemicals called fatty acids that might reduce pain and swelling (inflammation). There is some evidence that emu oil might work better for sudden (acute) inflammation than for ongoing (chronic) inflammation.

 

When emu oil is applied to the skin, it has moisturizing and cosmetic properties that resemble mineral oil.

 

 

There is many studies to be looked at, more in depth explanations of the transdermal barrier, and more specific information all over the internet.  I think I went the extra yard already.

 

Look for the actual scientific information.  There are as many BS claims about Emu oil as there is for cannabis oil out there. 

 

Coconut oil does not allow enough absorption.

 

Now, go figure out why and come back and educate the world! 

 

Thank you.

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I'll take that as a "my name is malumute and i'm talking out of my donkey like normal"

 

 

 

Wow mal, really?

People come here for information and discussions.

Why bother being here if you do not want to "spend time answering stupid questions..."?

What an insult to gary and all readers.

 

This kind of attitude is why I rarely come here anymore.

Shameful.

 

On a personal note; Emu oil is uber expensive and in my research I find no conclusive

evidence that it is worthy of the extra cost.  I also prefer not to smear bird fat on my skin.

I'll stick with coconut oil for the win.

 

 

I mean, you do realize, imiubu,  I posted helpful information and then I guess because I didn't reply in a timely manner( I only read about 1 in 10 threads here), and I was told I am talking out my arse as 'normal'.

 

I think my response was reasoned to what was said to me for simply posting 'Valuable information to a Question'. .  I think yours and gary's are ridiculous. 

 

I provide good information. Gary calls me a name. I tell him to go figure it out for himself then. You are offended at ME? Really?.

 

Look in a mirror....

 

That is ridiculous.  Seriously.  Ridiculous.

 

What happened to you two?

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I mean, you do realize, imiubu,  I posted helpful information and then I guess because I didn't reply in a timely manner( I only read about 1 in 10 threads here), and I was told I am talking out my arse as 'normal'.

 

I think my response was reasoned to what was said to me for simply posting 'Valuable information to a Question'. .  I think yours and gary's are ridiculous. 

 

I provide good information. Gary calls me a name. I tell him to go figure it out for himself then. You are offended at ME? Really?.

 

Look in a mirror....

 

That is ridiculous.  Seriously.  Ridiculous.

 

What happened to you two?

 

I read and process information rather well thank you.

I understand well enough that coconut oil is more of a protectant

and has a low absorption rate. That's fine, cannabis absorbs just

dandy on it's own. 

 

I am not sold on Emu oil as being superior.  I find no conclusive

evidence that is worthy of the additional cost.

 

I am not going to take my information from a company that makes $$

selling the stuff either.  Do you have stock in "The American Emu Association"?

 

There are people who take issue with using animal fats (vegans, vegetarians)

so, the Emu oil just isn't a viable solution in those instances.

 

I felt that gary was legitimately trying to pick your brain and ya blew him off...

that is why I was offended.

He also directed his question to highlander yet you felt compelled to reply.

 

I'm not sure what you mean by "What happened to you two?"

And I sincerely don't even care.

 

I'll not be back any time soon... so no reply is necessary.

 

carry on.

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I never called you a name....  Keep yourself in check.

Copy and pasting some garbage about EMU oil didn't answer any questions.
Further, when you read all the garbage you pasted, at the bottom, it asks, "How it works".

This garbage goes on to state it works because it has chemicals called fatty acids.....

HMMMMM   :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes: 

Fatty acids must be a novel thing exclusive to EMU oil and there is no way possible coconut oil  or any other facking oil has fatty acids.  (sarcasm)

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Did you insult me for no apparent reason other than I didn't come running to your beckoning call?

 

I responded when I read it.

 

You can apologize anytime you like.

 

Obviously as I said, you were looking for confrontation, not answers.

 

Have a good life.

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I'm sure EMU oil is very unique. Think about it. It has it's own unique DNA. Probably a unique mechanism. It would be something to try. Why not? Does it smell funny or something? Can't be that expensive for a small sample. 

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Its really good. 

 

But not for everybody, obviously.

 

I think this thread covers many different types of topicals. Even other suggestions made by myself...

 

Absorption rate IMO 'lowers' the cost.  If it takes twice as much hash oil to get the same end absorption just because of the carrier, the better carrier is worth more.

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