Jump to content

Mildew/mold Problems


Recommended Posts

I have two Cinderella 99 females in full flower going on 4 weeks in. The last few days a few of the flower sites have turned brown and died, I though this might be from being rootbound so I removed her from the pot and her roots are a very very mild yellow, like, you can hardly tell at all unless you have something white to compare it too, so is this root rot?

 

The flowering sites have started smelling very musty, almost, moldy if you will. It's similar to the smell of mildew that you would get from leaving a load of laundry in the washer for a week. Being it's extremely early on what can I use to save my babies, I don't want to have to cut them down as I've already killed 2 hermies just because I didn't want to take a chance... I don't have money right now so are there any house hold remedies I can use to save my babies?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can you snap a picture?

Hows your humidity? Watering schedule?

The rest of the leaves and stems are green?

What medium?

 

I had bud mold (nickle size patch of white mold right in the bud) on both of my fems.

Just harvested one of them, roots were in good condition.

 

I cut the affected area out of a cola on my other plant.

It seems to be doing ok.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's all of the flowering area's that smell like mildew, you can't even smell skunk over it. The plants started out in a Perlite mix, and were transfered into coco coir. It's not that humid. Feed - Water - Feed is how I water them, some of the leaves are yellow spotted and transparent at the leave tips, like being eaten by bugs, yet there are no bugs... Pictures will be posted later when the lights come back on at 8 P.M. as I don't want to flower up they light cycles

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My light is 18 inches above my plants right at my plant tops the temperature is 76.5 and the humidity is 36% with a dehumidifier running full blast and I'm watering like once a week, I wait until the Coir gets dryer.

Edited by cbenton
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My light is 18 inches above my plants right at my plant tops the temperature is 76.5 and the humidity is 36% with a dehumidifier running full blast and I'm watering like once a week, I wait until the Coir gets dryer.

 

Your humidity level should be between 50% and 60%. Also sounds a bit like they may be over watered with the yellowing roots.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I became repulsed by the musty smell lately.

 

My sister has a lung infection of fungus. She will probably be fighting it for the rest of her life.

 

People die from it.

 

I picked up a pocket microscope that has a UV setting for lighting. I looked very carefully at a bud that had a musty taste and smell.

 

There were some tricomes that glowed green. Like one of those light sticks. These glowing green tricomes had very small heads.

 

I'll never buy bud without looking again.

 

If it smells or tastes musty, it could kill you.

 

If you're growing that, please don't let anyone else consume it.

 

Some folks can fight it off, but patients are a bunch of sick people already.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aspergillosis

Edited by peanutbutter
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't think you can get a lung fungus from smoking.

With that said, I am not an authority on this it is just my understanding of the subject.

 

Ouch .. yes you can get it from smoking.

 

This is very important when you are talking about a patient that already has a lung problem. Or those with something like AIDS.

 

It can kill those kind of patients.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ouch .. yes you can get it from smoking.

 

This is very important when you are talking about a patient that already has a lung problem. Or those with something like AIDS.

 

It can kill those kind of patients.

Fair enough.

 

However, if you have a lung problem or AIDS shouldn't you maybe not be smoking to begin with? The smoke could exacerbate problems. Seems like one should be vaporizing rather than smoking if they have one of those conditions.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Vaporizing will deliver the spores also.

I have read that it does not. However, I have also read that smoking it does not but, thinking it through, I can see how it could. Obviously you are inhaling the smoke and it passes through the rest of the unlit plant material before it goes into your lungs. So even if the spores are burned up in the lit portion you could end up with live spores further down the line.

 

Usually I like to err on the side of caution, as you know, so I'll take your word for it that it could be a problem. To that end I edited my post above.

 

Seems like this could be a problem for anyone with lung issues. Even if the bud looks healthy and mold-free it could still contain the smallest beginnings of mold growth. That could be a big problem for those with compromised immune systems. Especially people on chemo who regularly have issues with fungus growth on their tongues, etc.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have read that it does not. However, I have also read that smoking it does not but, thinking it through, I can see how it could. Obviously you are inhaling the smoke and it passes through the rest of the unlit plant material before it goes into your lungs. So even if the spores are burned up in the lit portion you could end up with live spores further down the line.

 

Usually I like to err on the side of caution, as you know, so I'll take your word for it that it could be a problem. To that end I edited my post above.

 

Seems like this could be a problem for anyone with lung issues. Even if the bud looks healthy and mold-free it could still contain the smallest beginnings of mold growth. That could be a big problem for those with compromised immune systems. Especially people on chemo who regularly have issues with fungus growth on their tongues, etc.

 

Within the last couple of weeks, I purchased a half of some nice sugary looking buds.

 

Stopped on my way back to visit a patient that has, among other things,emphysema. Pulled out a couple of buds to leave, as a gift. Rolled one and tasted that musty taste.

The patient happened to have a pocket microscope that had a black light setting. Just recently, I had read that aspergillous would glow green under black light.

 

At first I found one or two trichomes that glowed green .. dayglow green. Then I turned over a bit of leaf and found a whole patch that glowed that way.

 

I smelled closely and could catch a faint musty smell.

 

I figured smell + taste + dayglow green was a pretty solid confirmation on the strain of fungus. The bad one. Not something to point at lung tissue and direct a flow of spore toward.

 

So .. the OP talks about a musty smell. My gut churns .. I wonder if any of the cannabis I handed to my sister, got her sick.

 

You have to have air movement. Air movement greatly lowers the likelihood of a patch of this one to get going in the buds. It is a very very common fungus. It is the fungus growing in the compost pile. Very common.

 

Once it's in the plant .. I don't know ..

 

It's a bummer to have a plant you can't do something with, but don't kill someone.

Edited by peanutbutter
Link to comment
Share on other sites

At some point, like at the first emergence of fungus growth, you won't be able to see or smell it. So what is the solution to this problem? Smelling the product is good but is it good enough? Couldn't one single spore of aspergillus cause problems for those with compromised immune systems? Almost seems like this could be a bigger problem than bug killer.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

At some point, like at the first emergence of fungus growth, you won't be able to see or smell it. So what is the solution to this problem? Smelling the product is good but is it good enough? Couldn't one single spore of aspergillus cause problems for those with compromised immune systems? Almost seems like this could be a bigger problem than bug killer.

 

Well .. lab testing would be nice. I'm just saying that if it smells musty, look more closely at it.

 

We are constantly being exposed to the spores. It's the volume of the spores and the person.

 

As for the person, we are a segment of society that are more likely than the general public to have compromised immune systems. So we are less likely to fight off the numbers of spores.

 

And yes. There are those that can't be exposed to a single spore. They tend to live inside plastic bubbles.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If the person has enough concern with this to be careful about their food and general environment, then yes they should be very careful about inhaling cannabis smoke or vapor as well.

 

But these spores float everywhere in the air also. If the person is so sensitive to infection that they have to be careful with breathing, then they should not be smoking or inhaling unprocessed cannabis, I'd think.

I know they're everywhere. Usually our bodies have no trouble fighting them off. But when you are in the middle of chemo your white count can bottom out and things that are usually benign to most people can infect and kill compromised people. This isn't just a "person in a bubble" problem. Many patients die from infections brought on by chemotherapy that reduces white counts.

 

I'm not saying the sky is falling. Just wondering about this topic.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share



×
×
  • Create New...