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Fugitive Alleged Lapd-Killer Is First Drone Target On U.s. Soil


knucklehead bob
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It's official: The drone war has come home to America. Wanted fugitive Christopher Dorner, the homicidal former cop currently at war with the LAPD, has become the first known human target for airborne drones on U.S. soil. Their use was confirmed by Customs and Border Patrol spokesman Ralph DeSio, who revealed the government's fear that Dorner will make a dash for the Mexican border. The fugitive has already killed three people, according to police, and has a $1 million bounty on his head. Dorner, who has military training, is believed to be hiding in the wilderness of California's San Bernardino Mountains, where locating him without air support may be all but impossible.

http://now.msn.com/christopher-dorner-is-first-drone-target-on-us-soil

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this story make me afraid for myself and our countries children.

 

from the comment section...

 

i plead the 5th..

No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a Grand Jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the Militia, when in actual service in time of War or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same offense to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation.

 

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fifth_Amendment_to_the_United_States_Constitution

Infamous crime

 

Whether a crime is "infamous" is determined by the nature of the punishment that may be imposed, not the punishment that is actually imposed;[2] however, crimes punishable by death must be tried upon indictments. In United States v. Moreland, 258 U.S. 433 (1922), the Supreme Court held that incarceration in a prison or penitentiary, as opposed to a correction or reformation house, attaches infamy to a crime. In Mackin v. United States, 117 U.S. 348 (1886), the Supreme Court judged that "'Infamous crimes' are thus, in the most explicit words, defined to be those 'punishable by imprisonment in the penitentiary.'", while it later in Green v. United States 365 U.S. 165 (1957), stated that "imprisonment in a penitentiary can be imposed only if a crime is subject to imprisonment exceeding one year". Therefore an infamous crime is one that is punished by imprisonment for over one year. Former defense attorney and Professor of Law at the University of Dayton School of Law Susan Brown concluded: "Since this is essentially the definition of a felony, infamous crimes translate as felonies."[3]

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yes

 

much better. :)

 

but only because i always wanted to be a helicopter pilot. :))

 

it would make me feel better if they didn't try to kill him without bringing him in.

 

what happen to the good ole days when we would form up a posse?

 

get a few hundred men to go flush his butt out...

 

hunt him yes...

 

don't blow him up blindly from the sky... that's a defiant violation of our constitutional rights in my humble opinion..

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good point.. cav

 

they said "target" and "drone" and i fell for it..

 

and i suppose i didn't mean to suggest that an air strike was now imminent as a result of them using drones...

 

i crossed my message..we are not there yet...

 

yet..

 

but..

 

we had better watch..

 

it could eventually escalate.

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I kind of felt sorry for the fugitive when I read how he was treated in training. But then I read where he killed those innocent children of his trainer. No good person would have killed those kids. He needs to be hunted down and no one should be helping him hide. If a drone does a better job then you had better use it before he kills some more innocent people.

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I kind of felt sorry for the fugitive when I read how he was treated in training. But then I read where he killed those innocent children of his trainer. No good person would have killed those kids. He needs to be hunted down and no one should be helping him hide. If a drone does a better job then you had better use it before he kills some more innocent people.

 

He has a hit list. His plan IS to do more killing.

 

Do I condone taking pot-shots at someone from the sky? No. I will always side with due process. That being said, if he is posing an imminent threat I don't care what you use to take him out--a chopper, a drone, or a bounty hunter (he does have a $1,000,000 bounty on him right now).

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Let's not forget to the two older ladies that were shot by police in L.A. because their vehicle LOOKED somewhat like the fugitive's vehicle. These ladies were minding their own business trying to deliver NEWSPAPERS!

 

A case of shoot first... ask questions later???

 

Yeah. That sounds like a good policy to follow.

 

Thankfully there was no drones or helicopters involved, otherwise the ladies would be attending their own funeral right now.

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Let's not forget to two older ladies that were shot by police in L.A. because their vehicle LOOKED somewhat like the fugitives vehicle. These ladies were minding their own business trying to deliver NEWSPAPERS!

 

A case of shoot first... ask questions later???

 

Yeah. That sounds like a good policy to follow.

 

Those cops were dicks! Cops are people. Can you trust all the people? Can you trust most people? Cops are just people.

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If a person can not keep their nerves under control, they should NOT be police officers, human or otherwise.

Or doctors.

http://www.nytimes.c...colleagues.html

 

Or pharmacists.

 

http://www.examiner....ation-oxycodone

 

Or drivers.

 

http://www.latimes.c...0,7299930.story

 

Or construction worker.

 

http://www.scpr.org/...05-freeway-los/

 

 

Ah hell, everyone should stay indoors and wrapped in bubble-wrap. Humans who work will always be subject to human failings. Humans will ALWAYS make mistakes. It goes without saying that certain things shouldn't happen. Alas, no matter the activity engaged in, a human will make mistakes and have lapses in judgment. Maybe the answer is robocops and robodocs and roboconstruction workers, etc? I don't know. But if we examine every single accident or careless mistake we could rule out humans from every activity in life. Was what happened good? Of course not. Should the cops face consequences? Yes. Does it do any good to point out that people who make egregious mistakes should be forbidden from engaging in that activity again?

Edited by CaveatLector
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Let's not forget to the two older ladies that were shot by police in L.A. because their vehicle LOOKED somewhat like the fugitive's vehicle. These ladies were minding their own business trying to deliver NEWSPAPERS!

 

A case of shoot first... ask questions later???

 

Yeah. That sounds like a good policy to follow.

 

Thankfully there was no drones or helicopters involved, otherwise the ladies would be attending their own funeral right now.

 

 

Police Seeking Dorner Opened Fire in Second Case of Mistaken Identity

 

Torrance police say the man was driving a pickup resembling the fugitive's. The incident happened just after the LAPD fired on women delivering newspapers nearby.

 

David Perdue was on his way to sneak in some surfing before work Thursday morning when police flagged him down. They asked who he was and where he was headed, then sent him on his way.

 

Seconds later, Perdue's attorney said, a Torrance police cruiser slammed into his pickup and officers opened fire; none of the bullets struck Perdue.

 

Read More:http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-torrance-shooting-20130210,0,3955268.story

 

 

 

 

These idiots are doing more harm then good. Why not ban guns from roided out pigs?

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Cops go overboard a lot one night outside of fairlane mall i mistakinly started to go onto michigan avenue i stopped backed up ran over the curb and contiued down the service lane i get lit up by a pair of dearborn LEOS i sit there digging up my insurance all of a sudden i feel a barrel of a 9 mm in my left earhole i freeze the cop tells me not to move that im a suspect in a murder case out of dearborn.

 

We sit there for a full minute im telling them im not who they are looking for i hear over the loudspeaker that their suspect is a black male covered in tattoos im white with no tats the cop holsters her pistol then proceeds to rip my car apart looking for drugs to save face i guess long story short all they found was a butter knife i was using to install a stereo a few days earlier the cop says " i can take you to jail for possesing a deadly weapon" I said cmon!

 

Finally the senior officer said he was going to let me go but still wrote me a ticket for reversing up a freeway ramp comes to find out this was a guy who was shot dead by police and the feds a few years later who had my same name and middle initial but im clearly not african american so cops do rush into things without knowing the full story im just glad i didnt get my brains splattered all over my daytona because some cop rushed into a situation without full knowledge of whats going on or who they are looking for .

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Or doctors.

http://www.nytimes.c...colleagues.html

 

Or pharmacists.

 

http://www.examiner....ation-oxycodone

 

Or drivers.

 

http://www.latimes.c...0,7299930.story

 

Or construction worker.

 

http://www.scpr.org/...05-freeway-los/

 

 

Ah hell, everyone should stay indoors and wrapped in bubble-wrap. Humans who work will always be subject to human failings. Humans will ALWAYS make mistakes. It goes without saying that certain things shouldn't happen. Alas, no matter the activity engaged in, a human will make mistakes and have lapses in judgment. Maybe the answer is robocops and robodocs and roboconstruction workers, etc? I don't know. But if we examine every single accident or careless mistake we could rule out humans from every activity in life. Was what happened good? Of course not. Should the cops face consequences? Yes. Does it do any good to point out that people who make egregious mistakes should be forbidden from engaging in that activity again?

 

 

When you make a mistake with a 'drone', it can be a rather LARGE mistake.

 

Those people that use 'weapons' in their work 'should' be held to a much HIGHER standard.

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When you make a mistake with a 'drone', it can be a rather LARGE mistake.

 

Those people that use 'weapons' in their work 'should' be held to a much HIGHER standard.

Similarly, a mistake with a nuclear weapon can be a little big. But since we don't have nukes pointed at in-country criminals who cares? If you can show me a report where an armed drone was used against someone on our soil then we have something to talk about. Until then we are squabbling about whether an eye-in-the-sky is a bad thing.
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Similarly, a mistake with a nuclear weapon can be a little big. But since we don't have nukes pointed at in-country criminals who cares? If you can show me a report where an armed drone was used against someone on our soil then we have something to talk about. Until then we are squabbling about whether an eye-in-the-sky is a bad thing.

 

This part of my statement still stands: "Those people that use 'weapons' in their work 'should' be held to a much HIGHER standard."

 

Whether it's here in the U.S. or anywhere in the world.

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This part of my statement still stands: "Those people that use 'weapons' in their work 'should' be held to a much HIGHER standard."

 

Whether it's here in the U.S. or anywhere in the world.

As should those with a scalpel. But holding someone to a higher standard doesn't morph them into a super-human. They still make mistakes. Especially in high-pressure situations that cannot be replicated for training. There is a reason we don't punish a murder done in the heat of passion the same as we punish a murder with malice aforethought.
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As should those with a scalpel. But holding someone to a higher standard doesn't morph them into a super-human. They still make mistakes. Especially in high-pressure situations that cannot be replicated for training. There is a reason we don't punish a murder done in the heat of passion the same as we punish a murder with malice aforethought.

 

 

I still stand by my statements, etc, etc....

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