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Companies Vying For Right To Grow Med Marijuana


trix
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Companies Vying For Right To Grow Med Marijuana

 

Connecticut -- In the basement of his Bridgeport tank removal business, Joseph Palmieri opens the door to a shipping container. A very bright light pours out and reveals hundreds of tomato plants. Near the beginning of the new year, Palmieri hopes to fill the growing pod, which he says is his own invention, with marijuana plants.

 

"I always joked about it when I heard that it went legal in other places. I said when it goes legal here, that'll be my new crop and build the business," he said. "Then I got serious about it, and flew out to Colorado."

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If the resources were available , and the scheme was in place,I wonder how many of us would consider operating a grow op to supply the state for distribution ?

I think its going to happen eventually, and "if I was kid in a tie-dyed T-shirt and dreadlocks" I would want to be part of the budding budding industry, and anty up my escrow of 2.5 million for the opportunity !  What a great business that would be to work in. A brand new cutting edge facility producing medicine for the masses would make for a good nights sleep.

 

I wonder how many of the liquor producers had their starts as cottage industries, blackened by politics until the end of prohibition?  I wonder if they fought harder against regulation than they did to be part of the new industry?

 Big changes in the cannabis industry are happening all around us, and no doubt our state will follow the  others' who's plans work well.

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totally agreed, as most of our cg's would.

  As soon as  cannabis is "once again" accepted as medicine, would you expect any government agency to look towards a system of  allowing individuals to make it in their spare rooms largely unregulated, to supply needs of cancer, seizure, or any disease victims, outside of the medical field?

 

When I read of our allowances within the Act, compared to other states rules, our seem generous. Could you show me a politician who wants us to be able to grow and sell twice as much unregulated medical cannabis?    

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I don't know if all this hubbub will actually lead to real action, but I do think this is a decent compromise that would help everybody involved. It is actually a legitimate way to help the Act work.

 

Very good idea, but the underlying reality is that the pols in Lansing 'don't want' the MMJ law to work in 'any' form unless they control it, why would they help us by considering an increase of the patient/ care giver ratio of any kind when it's not in their interest to do it?

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Which pols in Lansing are you talking about, and what is it that they do want?

 

I believe that a majority of politicians in Lansing want to have full LEO tracking of MMJ and would love nothing more than to be able to tax it.

 

And I believe all the indicators coming out of Lansing since the MMM act was voted into law substantiate that opinion.

 

Just to mention one indicator: the push for legislation to allow the sale of MMJ in pharmacies.

 

If there are other indicators that show otherwise please list them, would love to see them.

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Increasing patients to caregivers will not address a common theme of "pest and mold free" medicine that is heard in and out of these proposals. I never hear them say "this would work better for the state if people could double their patient registries and make more money. Like any other medicine they often speak of quality controls, efficacy, standardization, and regulation.

I don't support new restrictions, but if we didn't arm them with incidence, perhaps they would concentrate on keeping our Act together so to speak, instead of shredding it.

 

A sensible approach would be to offer training in proper medicine production, grow room controls, patient advocacy, but that's not at all their mention.

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A visit to any grow store may show you different. The closest one to me says they could stay open with just the "Bug and Mildew" shelf sales. they serve a dozen surrounding cities, as the only option in the areas. pests, pesticides, mold, hand in hand issues in subpar rooms.

I browse the forum here and see many many  people discussing the use of these unapproved chems as "prevention". Maybe your compassion club could come in here and set up a thread for all of these misinformed posters?  I wish the good clubs were closer. Sharing info with like minded people is great. The clubs nearby are not like you think, as you've heard recently form a few posters. the one you speak of sounds like a fine example of what they should be !  Kudos to their members !

Edited by grassmatch
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shall I copy/paste the years of eagle20 and the like here?  and others posted right here, with full recommendations for use?  I didn't make that up man, it is happening, right here, even if you missed it. 

 

try a search on amazon for every pest control chem available, and read the reviews, and locations of the buyers. where you been? 

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I believe that a majority of politicians in Lansing want to have full LEO tracking of MMJ and would love nothing more than to be able to tax it.

 

And I believe all the indicators coming out of Lansing since the MMM act was voted into law substantiate that opinion.

 

Just to mention one indicator: the push for legislation to allow the sale of MMJ in pharmacies.

 

If there are other indicators that show otherwise please list them, would love to see them.

 

 

and i agree politicians want control of cannabis we have seen it by Bill after Bill just look at 660 who knew it was even coming up

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2) Dispensary/marijuana stores or other commercial distribution - Retail stores selling marijuana to adults, while all unlicensed and unregulated manufacturing and distribution activity becomes illegal. This is the nightmare of the 37%, because they really think "weed is bad," as bad as alcohol in some ways, and some of these people would even make alcohol illegal again if they were King. See Pappageorge response to Bob's letter; he is in his early eighties, but very healthy, so we could be waiting quite a while for the die-off predicted by many legalization proponents.

 

Zap, I believe your #2 will be the outcome; the state will want its 'tax' cut for the 'revenue'.

 

But if Michigan ends up not allowing AT LEAST the number of plants to be grown for personal use that Colorado allows (6) I will be moving on along, kinda like the mountains anyway.

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