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Non-Toxic Pest Control -> Organic Gardening Approach :)


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http://www.smilinggardener.com/lessons/non-toxic-pest-control?awt_l=JuYI2&awt_m=3v5vmjJ1F12DE1m&utm_source=aweber&utm_medium=email&utm_content=FU1&utm_campaign=autoresponder

 

Non-toxic pest control is becoming more popular with the growing interest in organic gardening.

In fact, one of the most common questions asked by new organic gardeners is on how to get rid of pests without using chemical pesticides.

As a result, you'll find many recipes for homemade "organic" pesticides on the Internet and in books.

Baking Soda Can Help With Certain Fungal Diseases

For example, baking soda actually works to prevent and eradicate powdery mildew (Erysiphales), blackspot (Diplocarpon rosae) and a few others.

I've even tried it myself just to see and it worked well on roses.

University trials have confirmed its effectiveness. A solution of 1-5 tablespoons of baking soda per gallon of water is generally recommended. Start lower though, as 5 tablespoons can hurt the leaves in some cases.

Efficacy is greatly improved by adding an equal amount of dish or insecticidal soap, or an equal part of horticultural oil.

The main benefit of these in this case seems to be that they help the baking soda solution stick to the leaves. I actually used molasses because it provides other benefits than just stickiness, whereas the soap is not microbe-friendly.

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Spot-spraying dandelions with vinegar

So using baking soda can help with certain diseases, but the problem with focusing on moving from chemical pesticides to organic pesticides is that we’re not recognizing the root cause of the pest problem and fixing that instead.

To look at the root cause of the problem, we first need to see why humans eat plants...

Why Do Humans Eat Plants?

We (and other animals) prefer plants that are healthy and full of nutrients.

Sure, most of us seem to have lost a lot of our ability to differentiate between a healthy plant from a not-so-healthy plant, but animals are still very good at it and they choose the healthy stuff.

Even farm animals, who haven't exactly been bred for intelligence, will choose healthy feed over the pesticide-laced, imbalanced feed that makes up the majority.

But this gets really interesting when we look at why insects and diseases eat plants...

Why Do Diseases and Insects Eat Your Plants?

What kind of food does an aphid (Aphidoidea) like? What does a disease such as powdery mildew prefer to eat?

We tend to think insects and diseases are making our plants unhealthy, but actually, they are there because our plants are unhealthy.

This is one of the biggest shifts we need to make in our thinking when moving to organic gardening practices, and to me it’s absolutely fascinating.

While animals prefer healthy plants, insects and diseases prefer the opposite. They choose plants that have a nutritional imbalance of one or more nutrients. They literally do not possess the enzymes necessary to digest healthy plants.

In fact, they don’t even see healthy plants as a food source at all! Sounds crazy, right?

Well I'm going to explain it, because this is one of the most important concepts to understand when talking not only about non-toxic pest control, but organic gardening in general.

I won't go into too much detail, but here's the gist of it.

non-toxic-pest-control-alternative.jpg
Beautiful beetle

How Insects Find Our Plants

Animals (like us) see with our eyes in the visual light spectrum. Insects, on the other hand, sense much of their surroundings with their antennae.

That’s how they find a mate and that’s how they find their food. These antennae interpret electromagnetic frequencies in the infrared spectrum, which is right beside the visual light spectrum.

Plants also emit pheromones that insects interpret as "food." Not all plants emit these pheromones, though.

It turns out that only sick plants emit them in such a manner as to be seen as food! This finding is one of the most amazing implications for organic gardeners and farmers.

Healthy plants simply do not emit these strong frequencies, so insects do not see healthy plants as a food source. But even if they do land on a healthy plant, for the most part, they do not have the enzymes to digest a healthy plant.

Why do sick plants invite predators to eat them? I don’t think we know for sure. Some people think the plants don't want to survive since it would be a detriment to their species (if sick plants were to continually reproduce, the species would not be as strong and would have a much more difficult time surviving, so they "take one for the team," so to speak).

I don't know about that, but I figure plants don't have the same anxiety about death that we do. All I know for sure is that insects eat sick plants.

As you may have noticed, most insects don’t go around eating any plant species in its path. They usually have just a few species or perhaps a family of plants that are their food and they don’t - they can’t - eat anything else.

That’s why plant predator books are often organized by plant, because when you know the plant that is being eaten, it narrows down the potential predators to just a handful.

It turns out that each insect antennae is shaped in such a way to collect only the frequencies from certain plants.

What’s Wrong With Non-Toxic Pest Control?

Other than the fact that they stop most organic gardeners from shifting their paradigm to see that plant-feeding organisms only eat unhealthy plants, non-toxic pest control products have a couple of other problems.

Many of them harm the plants to some degree, and most healthy plants can handle it, but if we’re spraying plants that are already suffering, the damage will often be worse.

Another problem is if we keep killing the offending organism with these pest control products, the predators of those pests may be killed or at least will never set up shop.

Ladybugs (Coccinellidae) won’t lay their eggs, which therefore won’t hatch to eat the aphids. Many of the beneficial microorganisms that would consume our black spot or mildew will be killed when we use baking soda or something similar.

Killing the pests does not change anything. Pesticides do not give the plant the nutrients it needs.

What is the ultimate goal for organic pest control? Create health in your soil and your plants so that the pests never cause any problems.

That's what this series of lessons is all about. And that's definitely what the Smiling Gardener Academy is all about.

Please let me know below what you think of this way of looking at non-toxic pest control. I would love to get your thoughts.

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We tend to think insects and diseases are making our plants unhealthy, but actually, they are there because our plants are unhealthy. 

 

i somehow doubt a fully healthy plant is immune to hungry insects.

plants evolve to fend of insects, and insects evolve to handle said resistance. only the strongest will survive!

 

it would be interesting to see a field of organic nutes vs a field of synthetic ferts and release tagged bugs into the fields and see where they land and consime.

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hands down they go to the organic side. not so hard to understand why. the very best tastiest plant material comes from the organic side, go figure

i somehow doubt a fully healthy plant is immune to hungry insects.

plants evolve to fend of insects, and insects evolve to handle said resistance. only the strongest will survive!

 

it would be interesting to see a field of organic nutes vs a field of synthetic ferts and release tagged bugs into the fields and see where they land and consime.

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 Floramite is labeled for "ORNAMENTAL PLANTS ONLY", AND listed as " not safe for food crops. "

 

After reading the msds I see that they dang near suggest seeking professional help just for considering the use of this toxin on medicine for the sick.

With known preventatives, and known organic miticides choices, hopefully medicine producers will come to realize the safer alternatives widely available.

 

Floramite is one reason mentioned by the companies that wish to remove our grow rights right this minute!  They speak of our pesticide/miticides/insecticidal approach and the toxic residues left on our medicine when it gets to the lab.

 

If Floramite is seen at a grow store today, please educate the store, and stop shopping there if they do not comply. A medical Marijuana gardening center is no place for toxins. read the labels, make smart choices, for patients' sake. Marijuana sprayed with toxins is substandard medicine, and according to the msds, downright dangerous.

Edited by grassmatch
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Floramite is labeled for "ORNAMENTAL PLANTS ONLY", AND listed as " not safe for food crops. "

 

After reading the msds I see that they dang near suggest seeking professional help just for considering the use of this toxin on medicine for the sick.

With known preventatives, and known organic miticides choices, hopefully medicine producers will come to realize the safer alternatives widely available.

 

Floramite is one reason mentioned by the companies that wish to remove our grow rights right this minute!  They speak of our pesticide/miticides/insecticidal approach and the toxic residues left on our medicine when it gets to the lab.

 

If Floramite is seen at a grow store today, please educate the store, and stop shopping there if they do not comply. A medical Marijuana gardening center is no place for toxins. read the labels, make smart choices, for patients' sake. Marijuana sprayed with toxins is substandard medicine, and according to the msds, downright dangerous.

I'm not endorsing anything but I do have a question;

 

Why does the safe use say that Florimite SC is safe for use on greenhouse tomatoes?

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I am aware, and not too sure, except for these facts: Floramite and Floramite SC may be different products. Consumers eating tomatoes after three days(with a systemic that lasts 21??) are  instructed to WASH  their vegetable before consuming. Nobody washes cannabis before use, except maybe with some tane, which just concentrates the residual flammable poisons for rso and the like.

 

I wouldn't personally eat anything with any pesticide applied if I knew, until I got really hungry lol. I'm no organic manic, but admit to going to great lengths on my farm to practice a no spray rule. We free range over 100 chickens/ducks, feed another 100 rabbits with our cut grass, fertilize all of our own veggies and fruits with the rabbit poop, feed 500 perch and tilapia with our garden scraps yearly and produce hundreds of eggs, we consume half of this bounty with a clear conscience, general good health.

 

 

Bifenazate: Hydrazine carboxylic acid, 2-(4-methoxy-[1,1-biphenyl]-3-yl) 1-methylethyl ester is flammable, and kills fish and worms and beneficial bacteria and should only be used in a ventilated area.

 Keep in mind, It is a violation of Federal law to use this product in a manner

inconsistent with its labeling.

 

 

FLORAMITE SC is a selective miticide for the control of a variety

 

of mite pests on the following plants:

• All ornamental plants, including bedding plants, flowering

plants, foliage plants, bulb crops, perennials, trees and

shrubs.

• All non-bearing fruit trees which will not bear fruit for a minimum

of 12 months.

• Greenhouse tomatoes, varieties greater than 1" in diameter

when mature.

Bifenazate providing fast knockdown and long lasting residual control up to three weeks.

 

I figure since there are safer alternatives to avoiding mites and management, why would I choose poison when on a health mission. may as well take rx made by the man, and buy the pesticide laden fruits and vegetables produced by them.  I choose cannabis as an ancient proven alternative to natural healing. there is nothing natural about allowing mites into the garden and then using poison to eradicate them. Mites don't get born on seeds, or clones, and sneak into rooms rarely. Proper controls, temps, etc, as well as keeping others out of the garden, inviting no stranger plants, good hygiene all go along way at preventing mites. I have not had mites, and I know its possible to avoid them. It wasn't easy, it wasn't cheap, it isn't always fun,  and it costs more than using poisons, but I've avoided them for five yrs to prove it can be done. If I saw mites on a plant, I'd bag it and discard it. If I saw mites on ten plants, same thing. Keeping an eye on the garden will minimize plant loss in this way. Webbing appears quickly, and should be dealt with swiftly. Jorge Cervantes with some drive helped me learn to avoid the borg.

DONT USE POISONS TO GROW HEALTH FOOD FOR THE SICK !

 

 

 

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Right. But how can you attack someone for using something in veg., that can be used right up until harvest on tomatoes?

 

This stuff all needs to stay in context. No one can be kicked to the 'curb', by the powers that be, for using something that IS safe to use on tomatoes, a food crop.

 

I think it would be better to not over dramatize this issue by tossing the POISON word around like you just sprinkled rat poison on your herbs.

 

I think it's bad to misrepresent a product by saying you can't use it on food when it clearly states that you can. Just as bad as saying something is safe when it is not.

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You may have misread something?  We were talking about Floramite. Then you brought up Floramite SC. Two different products. My statement were for Floramite, up until you mentioned SC. the above post refers to SC, for clarification. I like KingDiamond personally, if that's who you refer to "throwing to the curb". I see he adds all kinds of useful post here and is usually available too. I will however, try my damndest to put an end to the use of toxic chemicals used on our brothers and sisters food, meat, and medicine, including our medical marijuana. If it seems dramatic to you, I'm making my point. Cancer is dramatic, so are many diseases, look around. Follow the polio/DDT/(pcb?) train, you'll see. These poisons have absolutely NO business in our sickest patients supply. Veg or flower, who gives a crap, keep it out. Where is the evidence of safety in smoking flammable residue? what is the difference between an oral dose, or a burning vaporization inhaled directly into the blood stream? who knows?

why not use a natural control? why not destroy the infected plant? why not tighten controls for avoidance? money? time? losses? tough shiiiit. we eat those, or learn to avoid them all together, as responsible caregivers.

In no way at all am I attempting to judge King or anybody else. we all learn from others experiences. If I didn't care for the health of a member here, I would avoid the topic, like I often did at the grow store pesticide shelf.

  Everywhere I see an organic control, or a natural approach to pests, it always ends the same way." I use a toxin and it friggin works."  of course it works, so does a flame thrower, or gasoline in small quantities. lets be real, and admit we are not smart enough to know what is "safe enough" to use for a cancer patient treatment, or a stoner buzz. We decide these things for ourselves and we get explosions, toxicity issues, lab results plastered at political meetings, etc.

 

Why not represent properly in our community and set positive examples of natural alternatives to health concerns?  Imagine a time when corporate growers could not cite stats from local testing labs full of pesticided medical marijuana?  Imagine what those residues might be doing to our own bodies and dis-eases? Imagine if a cg was mandated to provide results before supply, like a livestock checkpoint, all because someone decided some random landscape poison for moms juniper bushes could be used indoors on his medical crop to save the cash he could have lost?

 

Can you imagine a plant's frequency when a flammable systemic miticides is applied to its surfaces? some of us consume and seek cannabis frequencies with reverence. I can't apply anything to my garden in good conscience, if it kills worms, fish, beneficial bacteria, harmful to my skin, lungs, and is flammable. I don't think that's so radical.

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Well, here we go again with that science stuff. Everyone knows that all the correct answers come from the Bible.

 

Here is what the Good Book says about food:

 

 

Mark 7:14-23

English Standard Version (ESV)

What Defiles a Person

14 And he called the people to him again and said to them, “Hear me, all of you, and understand: 15 There is nothing outside a person that by going into him can defile him, but the things that come out of a person are what defile him.”[a] 17 And when he had entered the house and left the people, his disciples asked him about the parable. 18 And he said to them, “Then are you also without understanding? Do you not see that whatever goes into a person from outside cannot defile him, 19 since it enters not his heart but his stomach, and is expelled?”[b] (Thus he declared all foods clean.) 20 And he said, “What comes out of a person is what defiles him. 21 For from within, out of the heart of man, come evil thoughts, sexual immorality, theft, murder, adultery, 22 coveting, wickedness, deceit, sensuality, envy, slander, pride, foolishness. 23 All these evil things come from within, and they defile a person.”

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what?  reading comprehension is a beautiful thing restorium2,lol. just kidding. what I said up there is here; If Floramite is seen at a grow store today, please educate the store, and stop shopping there if they do not comply. A medical Marijuana gardening center is no place for toxins. read the labels, make smart choices, for patients' sake. Marijuana sprayed with toxins is substandard medicine, and according to the msds, downright dangerous.

 

of course its on the shelf at some stores, and some states and even countries even have made it illegal to use. Whats it gonna take for the smarts to flow?

Remember the paclobtrazol fiasco? they sold it in unlabeled under the counter. people ate it up, doesn't mean its good for you. its a growth regulator for ornamental plants only.

 

I've been to responsible grow stores, ones that didn't sell floramite, or floramite sc.

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Pot and Pesticides: A Bustling Illegal Trade


Unmarked vials, confused cultivators, self-appointed regulators - the messy side of marijuana horticulture

By: Kate McLean

Pesticides not meant for use on consumable crops are available in “grow” shops throughout the Bay Area – a bustling market in which toxic substances are sold over the counter in unmarked vials.

A Bay Citizen reporter was able to purchase substances identified by vendors as the pesticides Avid and Floramite at hydroponic gardening centers in San Francisco and Berkeley. The reporter was offered a quart container of Avid at another Berkeley store for $400.

Three other grow shops said they did not carry the pesticides; two noted it would be illegal to do so.

State and federal laws dictate that pesticides should only be used on approved crops – which do not include pot – and that the pesticides must be sold in packaging that is labeled according to standards prescribed by the Environmental Protection Agency. It is illegal to sell pesticides without this label, which explains how to safely apply the substances.

The insecticides are considered powerful tools for killing pests that can destroy indoor marijuana gardens and ruin the lucrative crop, worth as much as $4,000 per pound on the street. Growers said use is common when dealing with serious infestation problems.

"When people are faced with a high dollar loss or taking a risk, they take the risk," said Sean Taylor, the owner of 3rd St. Hydroponics in Oakland, who says his shop refuses to sell the toxic substances. "I've had growers come in and I could smell it."

In interviews, growers and merchants describe an unregulated market for pest-control and growth-enhancement products, in which a kind of Wild West mentality prevails. Some novices confronting pest problems apply pesticides with a heavy hand, they said; posts in online cannabis forums include questions from growers confused about how much Avid to use.

"There's a lack of guidance on how to properly use pesticides," said one former grower who now works as a pest control specialist. "There's just a lot of guessing going on and a lot of misuse."

Floramite in particular is not designed for food crops, according to toxicologists, so it has not undergone studies to detect carcinogenic properties. Such studies are standard for pesticides used on edible plants. Also, because the pesticides are not intended for marijuana, there have been no studies about how pesticide residues might react if smoked.

"I don't have any data to tell me that it's safe or OK to use any insecticide or herbicide on cannabis," said San Francisco Agricultural Commissioner Miguel Monroy, who is charged with enforcing pesticide laws in the county. "There isn't anything that's registered for use on cannabis."

Marijuana is the state's biggest cash crop, worth as much as $14 billion annually by some estimates. But the drug is regarded as a Schedule I controlled substance by the federal government and is not regulated as a commodity. This means that pesticide companies and regulatory agencies do not supervise how it is grown or monitor pesticides that may be used for cultivation.

“We don’t regulate marijuana, we don’t take samples of it, we don’t test it and we don’t know anything about it,” said Lea Brooks, spokesperson for the California Department of Pesticide Regulation.

In recent months, concerns over the use of pesticides and other potentially dangerous ingredients in the Bay Area’s marijuana supply have created an expanding network of private, self-appointed regulators who do everything from certifying that organic marijuana is “clean green” to testing for contaminants. The new businesses have effectively assumed the government's regulatory role.

There are no quality-screening requirements for the 29 licensed marijuana dispensaries in San Francisco, Oakland and Berkeley, where pot in various forms is available with an easily obtained prescription.

The California Department of Public Health reports that there have been no complaints about illness or problems related to contaminated marijuana. No cases have been reported to San Francisco's health department either.

The Bay Citizen purchased glass vials of Avid and Floramite labeled "3 ml/gal" with permanent marker for $40 each at Berkeley's Secret Garden. A reporter was given a free glass vial that was identified as Floramite and labeled "FloraKill miticide (bifenazate)" at Grow Your Own in San Francisco.

This is the stuff," said the man behind the counter at Grow Your Own as he fetched a glass vial of white material from a small refrigerator behind the counter. He warned that it was strong, and advised wearing gloves.

"The white one's Floramite," said the woman at Berkeley's Secret Garden as she handed the vials over the counter in a brown paper bag. She instructed that about 10 drops of the substance should be diluted in a gallon of water.

"We don't really do a lot related to the growth of illegal substances," said Steven Moore, one of the owners of Berkeley's Secret Garden, who denied that his shop sells products for marijuana cultivation or gets many requests for Avid or Floramite. He said it was legal to sell Floramite over the counter, but called the Avid sale "a mistake."

"That's something we use around the store," he said.

The owner of Grow Your Own, who was identified only as Brian, said of the unlabeled vial of Floramite: "The quarts are labeled and then we just break 'em down into smaller bottles. It's a benefit for the customers so that they don't have to buy a $500 pint of pesticide."

A spokesperson for the California Department of Pesticide Regulation said it is illegal to sell unlabeled pesticides or use them on pot, but was unable to confirm or deny the legality of selling Avid or Floramite over the counter.

"You're talking about products that are being sold without labels," said Veda Federighi, the department's assistant director of external affairs. "Somebody can put anything in it."

Avid and Floramite have a low toxicity to mammals, and have been legally used in Bay Area landscaping. But neither government regulators nor chemical companies have never evaluated these pesticides – or any others – for use on pot plants.

"The toxic risk is pretty low," said Ron Tjeerdema, chair of the department of environmental toxicology at UC Davis. "But you're dealing with people that are buying and using it in an unregulated fashion."

The California Department of Pesticide Regulation and the San Francisco Agricultural Commissioner, who are tasked with regulating the sale of pesticides, requested that The Bay Citizen turn over the names of the grow shops for an investigation. Neither had ever investigated the issue of pesticides in the cannabis industry.

It is unclear whether pesticide-tainted pot has made its way into Bay Area medical marijuana dispensaries. At least six dispensaries are starting to voluntarily use some form of safety testing – mostly for molds or potency – to screen marijuana before it goes out the door. To obtain enough marijuana to meet demand, the dispensaries often work with multiple suppliers, who by law must be members.

Many Bay Area pot dispensaries evaluate marijuana by looking at it, feeling it and smelling it, a process they call "organileptics."

"They really know what they're doing," said Larry Kessler, the San Francisco health inspector who checks the paperwork at the city's 22 dispensaries twice a year. "These people know a lot more about the quality than I could ever figure out, so at this point, no, we don't go there at all."

In the East Bay, there are two marijuana labs, Steep Hill Medical Collective and Collective Wellness, that will soon begin testing for pesticides, but because there are no established screening procedures, they are creating their testing methods as they go. Steep Hill is working on a method that screens specifically for chemicals such as Avid and Floramite; Collective Wellness is working on another approach, and a third lab sponsored by a trade group called the Medical Cannabis Safety Council is in development.

"Nobody really has these tests for cannabis," said Debby Goldsberry, director of the Medical Cannabis Safety Council. "We have to start from scratch."

The testing labs are new players in an expanding marijuana industry that now includes everything from insurance companies that cover dispensaries for potential liability to lobbyists who push marijuana legislation such as the November ballot measure.

“You don’t go into the grocery store and buy white cans of fluid not knowing what’s in them,” said Addison DeMoura, co-founder of Steep Hill, which already tests for mold and potency. “People just want cannabis that’s tested.”

The issue of pesticides and pot has become a concern throughout the marijuana industry. Last year, the Los Angeles Police Department bought pot from one L.A. store called Hemp Factory V and found residues of a pesticide called bifenthrin, a chemical that is moderately toxic to mammals when ingested. An L.A. Superior Court judge placed an injunction on the pot shop because it violated food and drug safety law, marking the first time such laws have been applied to marijuana. The L.A. City Council went on to pass an ordinance that included a requirement for pot shops to lab test the drug for pesticides.

Advocates from the medical cannabis industry said this was an isolated case. They said most dispensaries provide a safe product.

“It’s just really unfortunate if the entire industry is judged by the worst example that they can dig up from under a rock,” said Dale Clare, an advocate of legalization who is also a member of the Medical Cannabis Safety Council.

State agriculture and public health regulators do not keep data about pesticides used on marijuana. Narcotics agencies do not track the chemical containers they find when they raid marijuana grow operations, and law enforcement agencies seldom test confiscated pot for contaminants.

But authorities in Humboldt and Mendocino Counties, where some of the marijuana sold in the Bay Area originates, report finding an array of chemicals and pesticides at outdoor grows.

Mendocino Sheriff Thomas Allman, whose employees eradicated 541,000 plants last year, said he routinely sees 7-pound plants that he calls “marijuana on steroids."

“I just don’t believe a lot of end users at these dispensaries in the Bay Area have any idea what went in to this plant to get it to be as big as it was,” said Allman.

Allman, who supports medical marijuana, has been to many pristine pot gardens where growers used no pesticides or herbicides. He said he would even give pot to a sick family member if a doctor recommended it.

"But you can bet your bottom dollar that there's a lot of people here that I would never talk to," Allman said.          

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what?  reading comprehension is a beautiful thing restorium2,lol. just kidding. what I said up there is here; If Floramite is seen at a grow store today, please educate the store, and stop shopping there if they do not comply. A medical Marijuana gardening center is no place for toxins. read the labels, make smart choices, for patients' sake. Marijuana sprayed with toxins is substandard medicine, and according to the msds, downright dangerous.

 

of course its on the shelf at some stores, and some states and even countries even have made it illegal to use. Whats it gonna take for the smarts to flow?

Remember the paclobtrazol fiasco? they sold it in unlabeled under the counter. people ate it up, doesn't mean its good for you. its a growth regulator for ornamental plants only.

 

I've been to responsible grow stores, ones that didn't sell floramite, or floramite sc.

But if no one is selling it, no one is using it. See my point? Drama for nothing....
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i have to say i totally agree with you on this grassmatch and have changed my ways as it applies to pesticides.  i have learned this past year or two that keeping the garden fresh, pest free, happy and vibrant means spending the time to love the process of photosynthesis. 

by understanding what the plant wants and needs i feel like i am coming closer to the truest form of medicinal properties that my strains can metabolize.

 

it is fun and amazing to watch the plants ask the soil for food.. it has slowed my "mental process" in life down as well.. i am living proof that operating a cannabis Garden is very medicinal to ones sanity...

 

nowadays i often times find myself sitting on the floor in the facility chatting with the "girls" while i am picking at the leaves and watering..

they really truly do respond to being handled.. two of my strains don't like to be touched at all once in flower and will throw a hissy fit if disturbed at all...

 

anyways these links are to a university study on mite migration and life cycles.. it talks about Nevada but much of the information seemed relevant.

 

http://www.unce.unr.edu/publications/files/ho/other/fs9605.pdf

 

FS-96-05
SPIDER MITE MANAGEMENT IN HOME GARDENS
Peggy McKie, Agriculturist, Nevada Division of Agriculture
Wayne S Johnson, State Horticulture Specialist
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Really? Not where I shop. Maybe you should be more specific.

I've seen Hydro Heaven on 8 mile in Detroit selling floramite exactly as described in the article. Small glass vile with no more than a usage rate. It's the only hydro store I've seen it at but I don't visit often or look for pesticides either.

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we saw in this thread a satisfied floramite user, and another poster sees it in his local store. why not error on the side of patient safety and avoid these systemic toxins?

 

You insist that floramite "SC" is safe. I hope you're not using the washed tomato (for ingestion) to the use as a spray on an herb intended to be dried, concentrated and otherwise burned and inhaled. Show me any peer reviewed information that using any floramite on medical marijuana is safe, or even legal?

 

Are you sure it was not Floramite SC? Why would they use the wrong kind, stupidity?

Money silly, its all about the money. that's why growers do not support the proper controls to avoid mites in the first place. its an inconvenience, its expensive, its slower, all amounting to less revenue. there is NO "right" floramite to use on medicine. That's a nutty idea born in profit and resulting in a sicker patient. No plant is floramite sc deficient, and plants do not like flammable liquids sprayed on them. Patients should never use any marijuana that has been treated with systemic miticides, but instead seek a product free of pesticide residue and toxic substances.

Really? Not where I shop. Maybe you should be more specific.

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