Jump to content

Recommended Posts

A Mexican Drug Lord’s Home Was Raided. It’s Even More Incredible And Horrifying Than I Ever Could Have Imagined
 

There was a matched pair of these found.

fwwNmym.jpg

.357 Magnum semi-automatics with solid gold grips.

hPPEIyk.jpg

This guy had a better gun collection than most legitimate museums do.

h5kD2be.jpg

Just a quaint little villa in the hills – Drug money bought it all!

U7JEYRE.jpg

Man-made cave and hot tub inside the home.

H8dtfwh.jpg

A collection of exotic animals – which were cared for in the grandest fashion, by the way.

K9tGdd5.jpg

8 Lions were on the property.

gacwpjx.jpg

A very rare Tiger.

31Hzxgl.jpg

The back yard pool.

jc32phA.jpg

Exotic art collection – some of which was illegal to own – some stolen.

QTAoaG3.jpg

  More guns than you could ever imagine!

CAUhZEG.jpg

This pile of cash before it was counted was estimated to be approximately 18 Billion Dollars!

6t56Y89.jpg
After it was counted it turned out to be a little more than 22 Billion Dollars!

From another angle.

n0LOkJA.jpg

Guns were hidden all over the house, along with ample ammo, just in case of trouble.

OLs6c5N.jpg

Stacks of cash were found in every nook and cranny…

EOO2Ijy.jpg
3ChGF9e.jpg
This case is filled with 100 dollar Bills estimated to be 1/2 a million dollars and no doubt headed out to make another drug deal with perhaps the Colombians.

18 plastic bins filled with 100 dollar bills were found…

m45FhZg.jpg

Another cabinet stacked tight with cash – all 100′s.

jhhigsQ.jpg

More 100′s.

TIrSWmC.jpg
BrlkroZ.jpg
Each of these stacks of 100′s holds USD 250,000 (a quarter of a million US dollars)! They also had millions in Colombian money and Mexican Pesos, although they preferred American dollars for the most part.

There were even stacks of Chinese Yuan found in one closet.

K2CLY5S.jpg

More Gold machine guns and pistols – most were never fired, just held for collection value.

QYxuALW.jpg
83ptmrF.jpg
WjVAJ1V.jpg
The money and valuables found in this one house alone, would be enough to pay for health insurance for every man woman and child in the USA for 12 years! There is estimated to be approximately 27 more of these houses in Mexico alone. Not to mention the ones in other countries who are enriching themselves in the drug trade. These people have so much money, they make the Arab oil sheiks look like welfare recipients. Their money can buy politicians, cops, judges, etc. Whatever they need they just throw down stacks of cash and it is theirs! This is why the drug problem is so difficult to fight.
Link to post
Share on other sites

The bottom caption reads:

The money and valuables found in this one house alone, would be enough to pay for health insurance for every man woman and child in the USA for 12 years! There is estimated to be approximately 27 more of these houses in Mexico alone.
 

Link to post
Share on other sites

There ya go.  Legalize drugs and the funds will pay for health care for the next 27 x 12 years, 324 years.  Add the billions or so used to fight the drug war and maybe we can straighten out education and feed the hungry.  Add the money spent on prisons for non-violent drug offenders, and we could start up a world class addiction treatment system.

 

Or we could just keep crime rings and Al Capones and say screw it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Curious how you came up with this figure of 324 years which would be the year 2338?

We have the highest priced health care in the world, right now! Certainly we are in a historic and milestone event in the timeline of individual health care, bringing massive changes to our health care responsibilities, only time will tell if this helps to balance out our ROI compared to what they get in the rest of the world.   

Alfonso was just another public servant, a creation of John E Hoover fantasies, or vice versa...

 

" Value for money: Health Care Costs...

 

A study of international health care spending levels published in the health policy journal Health Affairs in the year 2000 found that the United States spends substantially more on health care than any other country in the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), and that the use of health care services in the U.S. is below the OECD median by most measures. The authors of the study conclude that the prices paid for health care services are much higher in the U.S. than elsewhere.[84] While the 19 next most wealthy countries by GDP all pay less than half what the U.S. does for health care, they have all gained about six years of life expectancy more than the U.S. since 1970.[63] "

Edited by solabeirtan
Link to post
Share on other sites

Just remember that this pile of cash was made by slavery and murder. Not something that has anything good coming from it. Cannabis carries karma with it. Nothing good will happen with ill gotten herbs or gains from them. I've seen this for a good long time now. Call me crazy but I believe in that after seeing it time and again. This pile is just another hint at it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds like the American Revolution?  Sometimes it's hard to see the forest...

Just remember that this pile of cash was made by slavery and murder. Not something that has anything good coming from it. Cannabis carries karma with it. Nothing good will happen with ill gotten herbs or gains from them. I've seen this for a good long time now. Call me crazy but I believe in that after seeing it time and again. This pile is just another hint at it.

Edited by solabeirtan
Link to post
Share on other sites

Curious how you came up with this figure of 324 years which would be the year 2338?

I used the numbers from the propaganda piece.

 

"The money and valuables found in this one house alone, would be enough to pay for health insurance for every man woman and child in the USA for 12 years! There is estimated to be approximately 27 more of these houses in Mexico alone."

 

My guess is most this article is short on real information.  But if there was enough money in the one house to pay for health insurance for 12 years and there are 27 more houses just like it, you get 324 years.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Right ... and ifs and buts were candy and nuts ... every day would be Christmas! What they do have in Mexico is vast oil reserves, which their Presidente is in an unprecedented and desperate race to pry open.

 

You would think every one in America is a junkie according to these opportunistas.gallery_2767_621_4604.jpg

Edited by solabeirtan
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Similar Content

    • By trix
      Washington, D.C. -- If you're going to wage war on drugs, you need to be outfitted like a warrior.
       
      That seems to be the rationale behind hundreds of police department requests for armored trucks submitted to the Pentagon between 2012 and 2014. The requests, unearthed in a FOIA request by Mother Jones magazine, shed light on how the war on drugs has directly contributed to the militarization of local police forces in recent years.

      Read More...
    • By trix
      New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie ® said on Monday that the war on drugs has been a "failure" -- even though he has vowed to enact a federal crackdown on marijuana, a substance that has been a primary target of the drug war for decades.
       
      "This is a disease and the war on drugs has been a failure -- well-intentioned, but a failure," Christie said at a presidential forum in New Hampshire on Monday. He went on to say that the country should "embrace" people who are addicted to drugs and alcohol, offering them a chance at rehabilitation rather than incarceration.

      Read More...
    • By trix
      USA -- The war on drugs is over, and weed won. D.A.R.E., the organization designed to plant a deep-seated fear of drugs in the minds of every late-20th-century middle schooler, published an op-ed calling for marijuana legalization.
       
      Written by former deputy sheriff Carlis McDerment in response to a letter in the Columbus Dispatch, the op-ed explains that it's impossible for law enforcement to control the sale of marijuana to minors. "People like me, and other advocates of marijuana legalization, are not totally blind to the harms that drugs pose to children," McDerment writes. "We just happen to know that legalizing and regulating marijuana will actually make everyone safer."

      Read More...
    • By trix
      Colorado -- Oklahoma and Nebraska have filed a lawsuit with the U.S. Supreme Court asking it to deem Colorado's marijuana laws unconstitutional, The Denver Post reports. The states, which border Colorado, claim in the suit that their neighbor's recreational pot policy is "draining their treasuries, and placing stress on their criminal justice system." Because recreational weed is not legal in Nebraska and Oklahoma – and those states must abide by federal law, which also prohibits it – the they want Colorado's policy overturned. They are not seeking financial damages.
       
      "The State of Colorado has created a dangerous gap in the federal drug control system," the lawsuit – which Nebraska Attorney General Jon Bruning and Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt filed Thursday – alleges. "Marijuana flows from this gap into neighboring states, undermining [our states'] own marijuana bans."

      Read More...
    • By trix
      In an announcement today, the White House has pledged $263 million in new federal funding for police training and body cameras, set aside by executive order. The money includes $75 million allocated specifically for the purchase 50,000 cameras for law enforcement officers across the country. The training portion of the funds would go toward instructing police in the responsible use of paramilitary equipment like assault rifles and armored personnel carriers, much of which has flooded local departments as a result of a Homeland Security preparedness program.
       
      Additional funds will go to fund police outreach programs designed to build trust between local departments and the communities they serve.
       
      $263 million in new federal funding
       
      The cameras are designed to provide a definitive record of police activities, and have become a frequent demand in the wake of the Ferguson protests. The protests began with the death of Michael Brown, an unarmed teenager killed by the police in Ferguson. Community leaders pointed to video taken in the aftermath of Brown's death as evidence of police misconduct, and the subsequent outcry has triggered a Justice Department investigation. More recently, a widely shared video of Cleveland police shooting a 12-year-old named Tamir Rice has intensified the demand for video documentation of police activities. Last week, the parents of Michael Brown announced a campaign "to ensure that every police officer working the streets in this country wears a body camera."
       
      The new funding push is substantial, but 50,000 cameras will cover only a fraction of the more than 750,000 police officers currently employed in America. Camera proposals have also run into trouble with public records laws in states like Washington, which require the release of all police records not actively tied up in an investigation. With hundreds of hours of video generated by police cameras every day, that would present serious problems for both privacy and simple logistics.
       
      Still, many police departments have already looked into body-mounted cameras. On October 1st, the Washington D.C. police began a six-month pilot program that put cameras on the shoulders of many local police, and officials expect the program to reduce the number of complaints filed against officers by as much as 80 percent. The program wasn't cheap: it cost $1 million to buy and store the necessary volume of cameras. But after today, other departments that decide to take the same leap will have federal matching funds to soften the blow.


×
×
  • Create New...