Jump to content

Albuquerque Police Murder Homeless Man In Cold Blood


Recommended Posts

what could we do if this happened in every city every day ?

How do we know that it doesn't?

 

We need to regain control of our police. The only way it can be done is through the Federal Government, but everyone is down on the Feds due to propaganda by the right wing (that's Republicans, folks). We need the Justice Department to run herd on the local police and reign them in the way only the Feds can do. I saw this same thing happen in the sixties and seventies and it took Federal intervention to stop it. Redneck police need to be fitted with a choke chain and the chain needs to be yanked forcefully and frequently until they are once again under control. I really like the idea of putting cameras on the police. We need to contact our reps and request it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How do we know that it doesn't?

 

We need to regain control of our police. The only way it can be done is through the Federal Government, but everyone is down on the Feds due to propaganda by the right wing (that's Republicans, folks). We need the Justice Department to run herd on the local police and reign them in the way only the Feds can do. I saw this same thing happen in the sixties and seventies and it took Federal intervention to stop it. Redneck police need to be fitted with a choke chain and the chain needs to be yanked forcefully and frequently until they are once again under control. I really like the idea of putting cameras on the police. We need to contact our reps and request it.

 

Hate to be the bearer of such unfortunate news, guys, but if we are indeed dependant on the Feds to intercede on our behalf, we in deep-deep doodoo as this is their game. They are the ones promoting this type of behavior. Down to the bullet proof armor and other military issue paraphernalia.   More bullets can solve anything, is our/their moto, if not we have our own recently approved torture methods and special enhanced interrogation tecniques to rely on.  

 

The only ones that can do anything is the Citizens. When they decide that the benefits of gun ownership are outweighed by the amount of acceptable violence they can stomach, Game On! 

 

See all the children streaming into AZ, that's their reaction to living with an unacceptable, unbearable amount of violence. Alledgedley drug related, don't you know? They are begging for some kind of a better way, than guns and violence.  Our big chance to show some form of humanity or compassion to helpless victims of overbearing military run regimes. We'll see. Don't hold your breath...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Force recording of every police-civilian interaction would go a long way to improving police behavior.  It would also speed the court processing of clearly guilty individuals, quickly recovering the costs to set up the recording program.  Recordings must be unalterable and must be made available to the public (not just defendants), free of charge.

 

As we know, most police officers are well meaning people doing a dangerous and thankless job.  They are to be commended. 

 

Some police officers however are not 'good people' and want the authority and the gun so that they can legally use force over others.  In short, they are bullies.  If every interaction was recorded, police would be forced to 'follow the book' in arresting people.  This requirement would by itself go a long way in discouraging the wrong type of person from wanting to become a police officer.

 

Also, as Phaq mentioned in another recent posting, even the best people, including police officers, can be tempted into behaving badly.  Recording every interaction would remove that temptation.

 

A good question is, why are the police deprtments against this?  Makes one wonder.  I realize that in such a dangerous profession, these officers have to rely on each other and know that others have their back.  Promoting that 'us versus them' mentality within a police department however is exactly what leads to corruption.  Anyone snitching on another officer for anything short of murder is looked at as the problem on the team and an officer who is not to be trusted.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Police officers are no different from any other population-based demographic group.

 

They did a study some years ago in England. Students were randomly selected from school classes and given a special uniform and enforcement powers.

 

The results were frightening as once selected, uniformed and given enforcement powers, almost all of the students started to show alarming tendencies towards abuse of power and a belief in their own special self-importance with regard to those who were formerly their peers. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Police officers are no different from any other population-based demographic group.

 

They did a study some years ago in England. Students were randomly selected from school classes and given a special uniform and enforcement powers.

 

The results were frightening as once selected, uniformed and given enforcement powers, almost all of the students started to show alarming tendencies towards abuse of power and a belief in their own special self-importance with regard to those who were formerly their peers. 

These are the kind of studies that need to be made into documentaries and taught in high school psychology classes. People need to be aware of the motivations behind a police officer's actions.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

These are the kind of studies that need to be made into documentaries and taught in high school psychology classes. People need to be aware of the motivations behind a police officer's actions.

Most importantly, I think, is the Stanford Prison Experiment mentioned by washtenaut, performed by Philip Zimbardo in the 1970's.

 

 

The obvious fix is psychological testing and administrative control, both of which we know full well are poor at best and altogether unlikely to happen. It is not that studies don't exist, but rather that they are ignored and police power is granted to people ill suited for the task. 

 

This incident happened several weeks ago. It is one of dozens perpetrated by the Albuquerque police. 

Edited by GregS
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Most importantly, I think, is the Stanford Prison Experiment mentioned by washtenaut, performed by Philip Zimbardo in the 1970's.

 

 

The obvious fix is psychological testing and administrative control, both of which we know full well are poor at best and altogether unlikely to happen. It is not that studies don't exist, but rather that they are ignored and police power is granted to people ill suited for the task. 

 

This incident happened several weeks ago. It is one of dozens perpetrated by the Albuquerque police. 

I wonder if these characteristics show up in everyone who has"power"?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wonder if these characteristics show up in everyone who has"power"?

I don't think so. It is more likely that fuckedupness happens on a scale from non-existent to extreme. There are as many different flavors and degrees as there are people on the planet. 

 

Robert Sapolsky has some interesting observations in a baboon population that are almost certain to play in human behavior.

 

 

There are simply too many dikheads around that need to be taken out of the game.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is so unbeleivable! it reminds me of the homeless guy in saginaw last yr who was shot and killed by police!  what happened to all the money the tax payers spent on stun guns? with all of them officers with weapons and the homeless guy with lil short knives, Im pos it could have been handled with pepper spray or a stun gun, wtf after the shoot the guy they shoot sand bags at him,,,,how come they didnt use the sand bags first, every cop that fired any kind of stun grenade or gun should not only lose their job but be convicted of 1st degree murder, they had enough time to plan this murder, It is 1st degree, they should never see the light of day again,,,no amount of money can bring a person back to life, I dont even want to begin to understand this kind of thing being done by so many idiot cops, there is just no excuse!

 

something has to be done, it is already to late for the many innocent people who leo kills, how many are also in prison for yrs and yrs for something stupid like camping where they are not supposed to,,,Im sick to my stomach!

 

Peace

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is so unbeleivable! it reminds me of the homeless guy in saginaw last yr who was shot and killed by police!  what happened to all the money the tax payers spent on stun guns? with all of them officers with weapons and the homeless guy with lil short knives, Im pos it could have been handled with pepper spray or a stun gun, wtf after the shoot the guy they shoot sand bags at him,,,,how come they didnt use the sand bags first, every cop that fired any kind of stun grenade or gun should not only lose their job but be convicted of 1st degree murder, they had enough time to plan this murder, It is 1st degree, they should never see the light of day again,,,no amount of money can bring a person back to life, I dont even want to begin to understand this kind of thing being done by so many idiot cops, there is just no excuse!

 

something has to be done, it is already to late for the many innocent people who leo kills, how many are also in prison for yrs and yrs for something stupid like camping where they are not supposed to,,,Im sick to my stomach!

 

Peace

My pitchfork is needle sharp and I have a couple of spare torches if anyone needs one. Don't forget to bring snacks. Is this why we have a second amendment? Recently an Indiana man was let off the hook for killing an officer during a no knock raid. Yay.

Edited by GregS
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have watched more recorded incidents of out right murder by police than I can recall,

where there was minimal to NO risk to said police officers, like the one above.

Cowards waited til his back was turned.

This was cold blooded murder.

 

RECORDING THEM HAS NOT MADE THEM ACCOUNTABLE.

 

You make an excellent point.  However, if corruption extends into the District Attorney's office as apparently it does in Albuquerque, those charged with holding the police accountable have dropped the ball. 

 

Without recordings it is the word of the police officer versus the word of an alleged criminal.  Who does the judge and jury believe?

 

So even with recordings some are still going free but some are not.  The tide is turning with respect to the general public's inherent trust of the police.  I am talking about those people that don't ever interact with the police except when the cop is clearly being helpful. 

 

Because of the recordings, they are seeing that these supposed good guys can be very bad sometimes.  The exposure is the reason people are changing their minds.  Also, consider that many recordings of misdeeds get made before the officer knows he is being recorded.  If he knew going into the situation that everything was on the record, might he behave differently?  better?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Police departments in the U.S. have become excessively and dangerously militarized, according to a report published by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU).

 

The organization’s investigation found that SWAT deployments are increasingly used to search homes for drugs and are carried out despite the presence of children and elderly. It also said poor standards were used to gauge whether an operation was “high risk” — such as whether a suspect was armed and dangerous — and that squads were increasingly adopting warrior-like mind-sets.

 

Some key numbers from the report, which is titled War Comes Home:

 

•50% people impacted by SWAT deployments from 2011 to 2012 are black or Latino. Whites account for 20%.

•Seven civilians were killed and 46 injured in such deployments from 2010 to 2013.

•79% of all SWAT deployments were to execute search warrants for homes, most of them for drug searches.

•7% of deployments were for hostage, barricade or active-shooter scenarios.

 

Tragic case studies accompany the figures, among them that of Tarika Wilson, a 26-year-old mother who was shot and killed holding her 14-month-old son, and Eurie Stamp, a 68-year-old grandfather who was shot while watching baseball in his pajamas during a SWAT invasion. Bounkham Phonesavanh, a 19-month-old baby, was in a medically induced coma after paramilitary squads unwittingly threw a flash grenade into his crib, piercing a hole in his cheek, chest and scarring his body with third-degree burns. None of the victims were suspects.

 

The ACLU claims the militarization of policing in the U.S. lacks oversight and transparency. Not a single law-enforcement agency provided documents of all information “necessary to undertake a thorough examination of police militarization.”

 


 

It added, “Neighborhoods are not war zones, and our police officers should not be treating us like wartime enemies.

Edited by GregS
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

This Is Why Your Local Police Department Might Have a Tank

Josh Sanburn @joshsanburn  7:57 AM ET     

Alecia and Boun Khan Phonesavanh (center), the parents of 19-month-old Bounkham Phonesavanh who was severely burned by a flash grenade during a SWAT drug raid, attend a vigil with their daughters outside Grady Memorial Hospital where he is undergoing treatment, on June 2, 2014, in Atlanta.

 

David Goldman—AP

Forget Officer Friendly. A new report finds that local police departments are becoming excessively militarized, equipped with weapons, uniforms and even vehicles formerly used by the U.S. military in Iraq and Afghanistan

 

In a pre-dawn drug raid late last month in northern Georgia, the Habersham County police entered the home of the Phonesavanh family while they were sleeping and dropped a “flashbang” grenade in a crib holding a 19-month-old boy, who was badly burned and later placed into a medically induced coma. No one was arrested, and no weapons or drugs were found inside the home.

 

 

The officers making the raid were part of what the county police call an SRT – or a Special Response Team. That moniker is normally used by the military. But SRT and SWAT teams using military-style tactics and weaponry are becoming increasingly common.

 

 

As the Iraq and Afghanistan wars have wound down, police departments have been obtaining military equipment, vehicles and uniforms that have flowed directly from the Department of Defense. According to a new report by the ACLU, the federal government has funneled $4.3 billion of military property to law enforcement agencies since the late 1990s, including $450 million worth in 2013. Five hundred law enforcement agencies have received Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) vehicles, built to withstand bomb blasts. More than 15,000 items of military protective equipment and “battle dress uniforms,” or fatigues worn by the U.S. Army, have been transferred. The report includes details of police agencies in towns like North Little Rock, Ark., (pop: 62,000), which has 34 automatic and semi-automatic rifles, a Mamba tactical vehicle and two MARCbots, which are armed robots designed for use in Afghanistan.

 

“More Americans are becoming aware of the militarization of policing, but the use of paramilitary tactics to fight the war on drugs has been going on for a very long time,” says the ACLU’s Kara Dansky.

 

Throughout the 1980s, law enforcement agencies got more aggressive in how they served drug warrants. By the 1990s they looked to the military not only for equipment but tactics, and in 1997, Congress created the 1033 Program — with the motto “from warfighter to crimefighter” — that allows the Department of Defense to funnel surplus military equipment to law enforcement agencies at no cost. According to Pentagon data obtained by The New York Times, police departments have received tens of thousands of machine guns and 200,000 ammunition magazines since 2009.

 

As police departments have added military gear, they’ve also upped the number of SWAT deployments, especially for use in drug warrants. According to research done by Peter Kraska, a criminal justice professor at Eastern Kentucky University, 89% of police departments serving populations of 50,000 or more had SWAT teams in the late 1990s, twice as many as in the mid-1980s. In the mid-2000s, 80% of smaller police agencies – those serving between 25 and 50,000 people – had SWAT teams, up from 20% in the mid-1980s.

 

Those squads are increasingly being deployed for drug searches. According to the ACLU, almost two-thirds of SWAT deployments between 2011 and 2012 were for drug raids. Many of those units, says Kraska, base their strategy and tactics on military special operations like Navy SEALs.

 

“When people refer to the militarization of police, it’s not in a pejorative or judgmental sense,” Kraska says. “Contemporary police agencies have moved significantly along a continuum culturally, materially, operationally, while using a Navy SEALs model. All of those are clear indications that they’re moving away from a civilian model of policing.”

 

Using military-style equipment has an effect on the behavior of police officers as well, adds Kraska. “It changes the culture of the police department,” she says. “It gets them into a much more intense, paramilitary mindset rather than thinking about a community-oriented approach to policing.”

 

A number of incidents involving SWAT teams on drug raids have occurred around the U.S. in recent years, often involving force with military-style equipment that critics say is excessive. But some towns are turning their backs on military gear. In New Hampshire, a state legislator has introduced a bill banning towns from accepting military vehicles. And residents in towns in New York and California are speaking up about the militarization of their agencies.

 

In Habersham County, the Georgia Bureau of Investigation is probing whether officers broke the law in using excessive force at the Phonesavanh home. “I don’t know what kind of surveillance they did,” said the family’s lawyer Mawuli Mel Davis, “but that can’t be the standard.”

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share



×
×
  • Create New...