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I doth protest,, gmo.==bad   LOL  messin with the order... dont mess with the order,, 

 

Personal opinion.. I just dont think its right to modify the plants, any , or animals ether for that matter.. they will get it so bad we can't eat the meat, or the veggys,, no idea how this is gonna go down, but i saw pics of heavy laden gmo wheat.. its a foot shorter than reg.. and doesn't produce as well as plain wheat.. IDK im not no chemist but an old guy that i am says leave well enough alone...

 

I keep bees, they are dying because of gmo altered crops, like the neoteenoids kills bees dead,, just slowly,, 

Edited by Willy
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Monsanto has cannabis labs working with the makers of Sativex. THC, CBD, GURT, T-GURT, V-GURT are the main focus of the efforts.

 

GURT=Genetic Use Restriction Technology=restricting the use of genetically modified plants by causing second generation seeds to be sterile=Terminator Seeds

T-GURT=modifies a crop in such a way that the genetic enhancement engineered into the crop does not function until the crop plant is treated with a chemical that is sold by the biotechnology company.

V-GURT=1.Variety-level Genetic Use Restriction Technologies=produces sterile seeds, so the seed from this crop could not be used as seeds, but only for sale as food

 

those are the commercial interests in cannabis technologies.

Personal interests may include tissue culture production, chromosome manipulation, pest interference, color, height, appearances, anomalies, etc. these tasks can and are being performed on cannabis around the world in closets and basements.

 

Recall a plant indoors will be genetically modified through generations of cloning and flowering. Each may evolve into a more suitable plant for it's environment with each generation of duplication.

Breeding, insertion of agribac, alien proteins, gold, will forever change a plant and its downline. I've seen it, often. Scientists tell you of the million dollar equipment needed and all of the specialized training, in a similar way that the gas station attendant is sure the bosses gas station business would fail if it were not for them. Nothing against the gas jockey of course, tht happens to be one some of the best fun on the job I ever had ! When I quit, the station closed.....Lol

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I do have stuff to read, copy/paste mostly found online google.

 

Simply put agrobacterium is cultivated, fed something like ecoli, and used as a vector to insert the genetic coding of other ??

I have experience with gold, agro, ecoli,(not the poop one silly's) and my star, the jelly fish protein responsible for illumination. It should be said that the acquisition and possession of agrobacterium could be considered an act of terrorism possibly, and requires special permits to work with/purchase. The thought is that a spec of it could ruin thousands of acres of any crop. It will pick up molds, pathogens, virus' etc and insert them into a plants' dna forever, making permanent changes in the each downline if not "sterile" beforehand. Clones not taken under sterile conditions normally will be infected with sorts, and sometimes not noticed for dozens of copies, or ever. but sometimes a plant with a couple leaves, or a variegated one may appear. it takes the millions in equipment to discern the exact changes to be made, but only an imagination to try everything and track results. Inserted gold or "ormus" is the most fascinating, since glowing jellyfish proteins, or short lived firefly genes. This is not a glowing area where an insertion is made, but a clonable plant exhibiting the same traits forever.

With millions I could figure out which genes and RNA changes can be made, and predict their results. I was held prisoner and forced to tissue culture plants as a child. I was given crushed vitamins, gelatin, alcohol burner, tweezers, bleach, soap, willow branches, cloning gels =(auxins/cytokines), pressure cooker, babyfood jars and test tubes. I still use the same equipment, except I

graduated to basal salts replacing the vitamins, avoiding the fillers). I use a "sonic toothbrush cleaner" to sterilize plant material with bleach/alcohol now, adding a super increase in success. One baby food jar is capable of producing around 1200 viable "clones" per month for thought. Sterile, with all virus/pathogen/molds removed, a "cleaned" artificial seed or clone is surely prized by me. This is the future of cannabis. actually its the now. Every seed we buy in the store has been made this way for uniformity. Seed producers insert gold on a genetic level for various reasons, oh my...

The book Plants From Test Tubes was the most fascinating read on the subject. I often say if I had that book when I was 13 my (favorite)plants would be talking by now!

 

Agrobacterium insertion can be seen in the wild. Look for the trunk of a tree with huge knot like an inner tube wrapped around it. This is evidence of the bacteria invasion, and can be harvested with some practice. just saying.

a simple mold grown with the bacteria insertion will cause all kinds of wild anomalies. They are repeatable, if the mold/bacteria are pure and identified as such.

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Let's see a glowing f'ing plant then.

patent infringement, but they exist. I have seen them. The Army uses a sprout that illuminates in the presence of bomb making materials. They air drop artificial cultured seeds with their own water supply and fly over next day with goggles at night. Plans for dna/gold infused trees are in place as ornamental illuminated fixtures. The technology is old, the frontier is vast. The day Cali

lightened up on medical cannabis was the day I no longer believed that nobody is dikking around with cannabis genetics. Cannbis DNA has already been sequenced....gotta wonder.....why?

 

http://genomebiology.com/2011/12/10/r102

http://www.acgtinc.com/marijuana_genotyping.htm

http://www.medicinalgenomics.com/resources/cannabis/

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22014239

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patent infringement, but they exist. I have seen them. The Army uses a sprout that illuminates in the presence of bomb making materials. They air drop artificial cultured seeds with their own water supply and fly over next day with goggles at night. Plans for dna/gold infused trees are in place as ornamental illuminated fixtures. The technology is old, the frontier is vast. The day Cali

lightened up on medical cannabis was the day I no longer believed that nobody is dikking around with cannabis genetics. Cannbis DNA has already been sequenced....gotta wonder.....why?

 

http://genomebiology.com/2011/12/10/r102

http://www.acgtinc.com/marijuana_genotyping.htm

http://www.medicinalgenomics.com/resources/cannabis/

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22014239

 

 

I mean a glowing "weeed" plant.  ...So you think this sort of thing is ethical?

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I read some of this stuff. Is it curmudgeonly to say that this stuff grosses me out? It doesn't seem like something that should be fiddled with on purpose.

if you ever consume most any packaged foodstuff, you are consuming an end product of genetic manipulation, unless informed otherwise. Most corns, grains, sugars, starches, flours, fruits, nuts, soybeans, soymilk, rice etc has been GMO'd yrs ago. FlavrSavr tomato hit the market in the ninety's . This stuffs been around for a long time, nothing new.

To make Arctic apples, biologists took genes from Granny Smith and Golden Delicious varieties, modified them to suppress the enzyme that causes browning, and reinserted them in the leaf tissue. It's a lot more accurate than traditional methods, which involve breeders hand-pollinating blossoms in hopes of producing fruit with the desired trait. Biologists also introduce genes to make plants pest- and herbicide-resistant; those traits dominate the more than 430 million acres of GMO crops that have already been planted globally. Scientists are working on varieties that survive disease, drought, and flood.

 

Here's some of the common ones that

can be found in roughly two-thirds of processed foods sold in the U.S.

 

Cheese

 

Rennet is key in making firm cheeses—specifically, an enzyme called chymosin in the rennet helps harden cheese. Traditional rennet comes from the lining of calf stomachs, but an estimated 80 to 90 percent of hard cheeses in the U.S. are made with bacteria modified with the rennet-producing cow gene.

 

Corn

 

Trait: Tolerates herbicides; resists insects

Total U.S. crop, by acreage: 85% herbicide-tolerant; 76% insect-resistant

Found in: Processed foods, such as crackers and cereals; corn on the cob; livestock feed

 

Cotton

 

Trait: Tolerates herbicides; resists insects

Total U.S. crop, by acreage: 82% herbicide-tolerant; 75% insect-resistant

Found in: Processed foods, including salad dressings; livestock feed

 

Papaya

 

Trait: Resists ringspot virus

Total U.S. crop, by acreage: More than 50%

Found in: Whole fruit and other products

 

Rapeseed

 

Trait: Tolerates herbicides

Total U.S. crop, by acreage: More than 50%

Found in: Canola oil; processed foods

 

Soy

 

Trait: Tolerates herbicides

Total U.S. crop, by acreage: 93%

Found in: Processed foods, such as cereals and breads; food additives, such as lecithin; livestock feed

 

Squash

 

Trait: Resists various viruses

Total U.S. crop, by acreage: 12%

Found in: Whole vegetables and other products

 

Sugar beets*

 

Trait: Tolerates herbicides

Total U.S. crop, by acreage: 95%

Found in: Refined sugar

 

Wine

 

Certain wine yeasts have been modified to remove histamines that can trigger migraines. One example is yeast strain ML01 in the U.S., which also boosts taste and color.

 

*No modified proteins remain in the final product

Edited by grassmatch
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I mean a glowing "weeed" plant.  ...So you think this sort of thing is ethical?

I mean a glowing weed plant also, when referring to patent infringements. the techniques used to conduct this type of manipulation are protected.

 

ethical? "this type of thing" has been voted in by the masses, and passed by acts of congress. The church accepts the technology with open arms. who am I to judge? Unethical may include adding an addictive gene, or one that harms an immune system, or carries with it the nasty bacterias involved, right to the end user ....just like it is already happening.

The practice involves the use of antibiotics, and bacterial tolerance build up. Some must live and some must die. The experiments in the million dollar labs often go awry. Most closet hobbyist quit after their first trial often ending in exotic mold production

rather than perfect cannabis.

I've used my hobby to perfect clonal storage techniques. I now have cuttings stored for 5 yrs in a test tube with a little led light in a closet. I've grown them, cloned from them without growing them, cultured from them, but now concentrate on the cultures instead of the clones, for logistics, plant counts,etc etc.

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The illumination is not exactly a "glow", but the answer is yes. I have seen cannabis gladly expressing the GFP gene, some in huge ways, some only a stalk, stem or leaf. I've seen transgenic animals too, including human tissue that expresses the same gene. some. Some proteins can be manipulated to actually display unique properties like red-shifted emission above 600 nm or photoconversion from a green-emitting state to a red-emitting state. I have not seen that in a plant yet, but have personally seen it in culture vessels, expressing on several different life forms, and their down lines, and heterologous unions.

 

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s002990100346

http://bfg.oxfordjournals.org/content/9/2/129.full

http://www.ehow.com/about_5571111_transgenic-cloning.html

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12448420

http://www.livescience.com/16752-gfp-protein-fluorescent-nih-nigms.html

 

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/3c/GFP_Mice_01.jpg/220px-GFP_Mice_01.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f2/GloFish.jpg/220px-GloFish.jpg

 

 

Techniques Used for Generating Transgenic Plants

 

As with bacteria, the ability to genetically modify plants depends on obtaining genetically identical populations and readily manipulating DNA. How do you "clone" a plant? Many plant species naturally undergo asexual reproduction by fragmentation, where segments from a parent plant regenerate a new plant. It is also possible to grow plants in culture from small explants. Another method is to culture plants from totipotent cells found in plant meristems. These plant cells can divide and differentiate into the various types of specialized cells. In a test tube, plant cells will divide and form an undifferentiated callus. When hormones in the culture medium are adjusted, the callus will sprout shoots and roots and eventually develop into a plantlet that can be transplanted to soil. To clone a plant - perhaps a plant with new genes - the growing callus is simply subdivided. Thousands of genetically identical plants can be generated in this way.

 

How do you get a plant to take up a gene? Researchers working with rice often use the soil bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens. This bacterium, the cause of crown gall disease in many fruit plants, is well known for its ability to infect plants with a tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid. A section of the Ti plasmid, called T-DNA, integrates into chromosomes of the plant. Recombinant DNA can be added to the T-DNA, the gall-inducing genes removed, and infection by the bacteria - containing the recombinant plasmid - will provide for transfer of novel genes to plant embryos.

 

 

 

 

Figure 3. Gene gun

 

Although Agrobacterium tumefaciens works for introducing plasmids into rice, not all plants are equally susceptible to this bacterium. Researchers interested in modifying crops such as wheat and corn have turned to other methods for delivering genes to plant cells. One approach is to use a "gene gun," (Fig. 3) which fires plastic bullets filled with DNA-coated metallic pellets. An explosive blast or burst of gas propels the bullet toward a stop plate. The DNA-coated pellets are directed through an aperture in the stop plate, and then penetrate the walls and membranes of their cellular targets. Some projectiles penetrate the nuclei of cells, where occasionally the introduced DNA integrates into the DNA of the plant genome. Transformed cells can then be cloned in culture.

 

Marker genes are often included in DNA constructs so that plants that have acquired the novel DNA can be selected. In plants, marker genes include those for herbicide resistance. Plants that grow in the presence of the herbicide are assumed to possess the transgene of interest. The transgenic plant embryos are cultivated in tissue culture. Once mature plants are obtained they are evaluated for the activity of the introduced gene, any unintended effect on plant growth, and product yield and quality. The ability of the gene to be expressed in subsequent plant generations is also evaluated.

 

Not all genes are expressed in every tissue of a plant. When golden rice was developed it was necessary to ensure that the novel genes were expressed in the endosperm of the seed. The endosperm of a seed is the starchy component that provides energy and nutrients for the developing plant embryo. Regulatory DNA sequences upstream from the specified genes were introduced into the recombinant Ti plasmids. Such regulatory regions influence where and when a gene will be expressed. (See the Genomics unit.) The regulatory regions chosen for golden rice provide an uninhibited transcription of the genes in endosperm

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I've seen glowing mushrooms.

me too. they naturally occur in nature. I can honestly say I have not ever eaten one though lol. planting kits are available for them on google now. same with the jellyfish, or the isolated proteins. it used to be expensive as heck to get that, now its in candy and drinks.

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Believe it or not, none of that helped. I don't think that highly of processed foods.

I know right, but that leaves flour, corn, sugar, rice, peas, tomatoes, watermelons, oranges, apples, wheat, whole grains, pears, cantaloupe, cucumbers, cows, pigs, bees, milk, lamb and more, even the sugar beet has been exploited not to mention the seeds that are sold to "grow your own" vegetables. Their origin is also cultured gmo. It scares the heck out of me knowing that this type of research is a "for profit" venture, with old Batman series type villains at the helm.

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