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Looking To Network With A Botanist


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Without getting into too much detail it involves an application were putting together for a dispensary license in another state. We really don't need a botanist put it looks good on an application. Could turn out to be a nice gig for someone if it goes well.

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That right there drives me away from such a thing to be honest. "We don't really need a Botanist, but it looks good on an application." I'm going to have to thumbs down that one for my book, because to me it sounds a lot like "We only have this persons name here so that we look good and not shady." 

 

With how I view things, to have worked to achieve a degree in Botany, one wouldn't be so willing to just sign a piece of paper to put their name into something where their area of expertise isn't really needed, but almost appears to be brushed under a rug or discredited for purposes other than paper-signing, but hey, it looks good right?

Edited by AbominableDro-Man
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Yes I do not need a botanist to cultivate cannabis. Nor do I think a botanist can do a better job than the thirty plus years of experience of the people I'm working with. I personally think it's stupid that I even have to look for one just to please the powers at be. But hey that's the way this lovely system works isn't it. I knew a botanist caregiver years ago who grew subpar meds. So keep your comments to your self if you can't help

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well the best nutes i have ever used come out of the mississippi river in  illinois.  they happen to be organic.  they match yield with AN prods and work in both water! and solid mediums, yet illinois corn and soybean farmers are the only purchasers of them (for use in fields).  our community in all states and in our own state shuns them out of PURE PREJUDICE----so what to make of that?  i make of it that a mindset is a terribly difficult  thing to re-cultivate.  growing bud is easy; changing minds is impossible--they cling to NASTY HABITZ.

you are speaking ill of other growers when here in mich we have twisted minds that ignore health and well-being and howl over the use of tiny amounts of pesticides (that clear the plant before harvest) while pouring poison into our medium by the gallon.   if we were like crop farmers in illiniois and not like the bud growers of other states there would be soaring demand from our community for this illinois river product, and a rush toward bio-organic.

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Interesting pic.

 

What I am thinking about is the size & scale of the operations/businesses. It only allows for those that can produce for very large numbers, larger than any other place to date. I'v seen commercial ops on the scale of 200 lts in CO, and let me assure you that no one on that scale controls their environment well (indoor). Not a one was capable nor inclined to invest properly in the planning, equipment or management on that scale. The result mandates the use of commercial pesticides & fungicides, and they still couldn't contain bugs & mold.

 

Outdoors, our commercial crops have the same issues, imo. Commercial crops intended to address the needs of millions are dependent on such chemical management. And mj is not exclusive to this fact.

 

IL is set up to only have such a system, kind of just as bad as the Canadian model. I get that this is preferred by big business, even necessary when you consider limited licensing for grows (requires massive scale by those few manufacturers). But a small localized production facility (say many small caregiver type ops, with 20-40lts) can control their environment much better & even though it still costs 6 figs in equipment/build out, it doesn't cost millions.

 

No one wants to spend millions on front side equipment when they can theoretically control for pathogens w tens of thousands in chems. Not saying the nutes aren't a problem (esp waste runoff disposal & protecting our water sources), but I assure you large scale commercial production necesitates the use of ipm & chemical sprays. No way around it.

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theres a small movement with some farms using sustainable farming practices , less fertilizer, cover crops, biochar and no-till to reduce the dependency on pesticides and fungicides.

I love this idea. Localized, smaller farms, with many more people pursuing it as a career. The food we eat is mostly grown/raised within the local community, not shipped from thousands of miles away. Keep the money & labor of the community within the community. Crops & herds can be grown in a more sustainable manner that is safer for not only the consumers, but the environment. Same thing w mj. Bigger isn't better.

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