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enzymatic break down of dead material, and algae too without the addition of bacteria. It will make roots shiny clean and fishbone exaggerated, a good thing in my experience. Not necessary really, but if you have some extra cash, grow in hydro, and like bright white healthy as heck roots, this will do it, but so will Zone, SM90 and a few others. It does not kill anything, but does support the growth of a nasty brown algae resistant to bleach. It prevents the build up of dead material, converting it into brown jello globs/suds at change time, and in the bottom of pots. It will cause pump failures in some systems, clog lines in others, and will not "fix" a dirty reservoir, but will go along way to keep one clean, mostly. Sm90, peroxide, Physan, bleach, will kill life in dirt and hydro.

It's a weird recycled floor cleaner product used in hospitals, does perform as advertised, but is not the way nature does it, with live bacteria naturally occurring. worth at least one try for a grower I think.

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I have used Pondzyme in place of hygrozyme also. 

 

Also, if you're in soil, there is no reason to use hygrozyme.  Use aerated compost tea with bat guano, castings and molassess.  Soil plants will explode.

 

I have as well.  I was a big believer in hygrozyme ($150/gallon, which is good for about 400 gallons of nute solution).  Then I tried Pondzyme and had similar results at about 5% of the cost.

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I'm sure this isn't exactly the case, but if it is barley broken down into enzymes, could I just brew some barley or a light grain at 130 degrees (130 is approx the temp for a protein rest in brewing beer). This process would leave things a bit sticky though...maybe hygrozyme is incredibly diluted compared to a beer grain conversion?

 

Zap, I have also heard that you can take 2oz of hygrozyme, 2oz of molasses, and 20 oz of water....ferment for a few day and then you have a new bottle. Again, this is probably all too good and too easy to be true, but maybe worth a try.

 

I haven't used the powder myself.  I hate breathing that dust.  And I'm not sure how it would work in a DWC environment...same with the home-made molasses brew, especially if it is sticky.  That just might gum things up in a hydro grow. 

 

I don't recall the pondzyme application rates, but it seems that a $15 bottle will last me well over a year, so I haven't wanted to experiment with home-brewed options.  I would expect that your idea of making your own enzymes would work, as all you are doing is creating an environment where the bacteria spores breed and multiply. 

 

I used hygrozyme for a few years before I switched.  The only thing I miss about hygrozyme is that pleasant hard cider smell. I went from about $30/week for hygrozyme to about 30 cents per week with no other noticeable effects.

Edited by Highlander
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I chose a flood and drain hydroponic technique for several years in a row, always changing my reservoir every week with no issues, and no hygrozyme. why would one wish to use this enzyme/floor cleaner in their clean regularly changed reservoir ?  I saw jellyfish is all.  

 

Who is talking about using floor cleaner?

 

I believe that you haven't had issues.  But consider that maybe using an enzyme would improve your results and maybe save you a few bucks and reduce nutrient waste/environmental impact.

Edited by Highlander
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Who is talking about using floor cleaner?

 

I believe that you haven't had issues.  But consider that maybe using an enzyme would improve your results and maybe save you a few bucks and reduce nutrient waste/environmental impact.

I stated that I have indeed used it, and that growers should try it at least once for themselves. I'm not a hygrozyme hater man, I just don't see the value added. My reservoirs stayed squeaky clean with regular changes and washings, without pouring an enzyme cleaner into my nutrient supply to make brown jelly fish is all. If the goo will allow a grower to change a res less often, maybe I could understand ?

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I thought it is meant for cleaning media between runs. It does work well for that. What is is supposed to do to help a growing plant?

This isn't an expert answer but as I understand it, enzymes break down old/decaying root matter and convert it to simple sugars. It seems this is away to get simple sugars to the plant in an inorganic hydro grow without using stuff like molasses that gums everything up.

 

Also, the enzymes compete with/repel "bad" bacteria that are oxygen hogs. I've run side by side comparisons with and without enzymes and measured dissolved oxygen in both systems. The solution treated with enzymes had consistently higher dissolved oxygen levels.

 

In other observations, I've noticed that when I run enzymes I get much more root growth. I can't say this lead to more yield or quality In the finished product so maybe there isn't really a benefit there.

 

I find enzymes most helpful in an aerocloner. I used to get really tired of cleaning spray nozzles all the time. Now that I use enzymes in the cloner it seems I could just about just keep topping off the water and never clean it. Recently, I let an aerocloner with about 12 gallons of water run for three months -just adding water to keep the level up. I could have let it run longer.

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Interesting, i wonder if the brown sludge is dead root mass converted to sugar?

 

I'm not sure if you're referring to the light brown, snot-like stuff that accumulates on the roots in a case of root rot or the darker brown stuff you see that looks more like maple syrup.  I believe that the maple syrup-looking stuff is sugar.  I read on-line where some people tasted it, so I tried that and it definitely seemed sugary - not very sweet at all, more like maple sap that is only partially reduced when making syrup.  It goes away after a few days in my experience.

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I just listened to an interview on NPR regarding agricultural practices.  Part of the discussion involved the role of enzymes in plant growth - how enzymes process nutrients in soil in a way that allows plants to more readily uptake the nutrients. 

 

I wonder how this affects an inorganic hydro grow - if enzymes help break down the nutrients for more efficient plant growth or possibly allowing for lower concentrations of nutrients in the solution.

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  • 2 months later...

I'm not sure if you're referring to the light brown, snot-like stuff that accumulates on the roots in a case of root rot or the darker brown stuff you see that looks more like maple syrup.  I believe that the maple syrup-looking stuff is sugar.  I read on-line where some people tasted it, so I tried that and it definitely seemed sugary - not very sweet at all, more like maple sap that is only partially reduced when making syrup.  It goes away after a few days in my experience.

maybe these are the "Root Resins" some speak of?

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I have no doubt of its existence, only of its content. I've seen a few different types of mycelium colonizing root systems for instance, some clear, some sticky even. Do your stickies colonize all of the root mass or only sections?  I don't expect that you believe its thc because its sticky? I do however suspect you have dried and smoked it. (because if convinced, I would have) Can you report on this?

The last thing I'd be interesting in today though is slathering, eating, or smoking  a mystery sticky found in a warm aero system root cluster fed with basal salts. I would at least send this stuff to a lab before introducing it to an organ for your on safety.   ;)

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I have no doubt of its existence, only of its content. I've seen a few different types of mycelium colonizing root systems for instance, some clear, some sticky even. Do your stickies colonize all of the root mass or only sections?  I don't expect that you believe its thc because its sticky? I do however suspect you have dried and smoked it. (because if convinced, I would have) Can you report on this?

The last thing I'd be interesting in today though is slathering, eating, or smoking  a mystery sticky found in a warm aero system root cluster fed with basal salts. I would at least send this stuff to a lab before introducing it to an organ for your on safety.   ;)

No, I didn't dry it and smoke it. lol 

 

At the end of a harvest I have to empty my 18 gallon, under ground, geothermal, aeroponic reservoirs.  They are normally right full of nice healthy roots. I have heaters and airiators in the reservoirs and they are totally entangled by roots. I have to tear the roots off the equipment. My hands get sticky just like when cleaning buds. The stickiness is not water soluable. I have to use alcohol to get it off my hands just like when trimming. I'm not looking for a use, just reporting an observation from first hand experience. 

Your comment was just an insult, that's obvious. Do you have any real reason, other than insulting me, for your question?

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nope, I wanted a smoke report. I would, as I stated, have dried and smoked it if I thought it contained active ingredients. I see sap sometimes on plant injuries, roots, and buds. I suspect they are sugars, maybe excess ones, as I never saw it on an outdoor cannabis plant. here is a pic of the same looking type of resin, this one is dripping from a purposeful crown gall infection indoors. I have tasted the droplets from root to flower and they all tasted the same, sweet, like sexy sugar. I did not taste this one.

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maybe these are the "Root Resins" some speak of?

 

Maybe a newbie and uninitiated grower would think this.  But there is a vast and obvious difference between the bacterial slime that forms on roots and the resulting sugary substance that takes its place once growing conditions are improved/stabilized.  It would take a very uninformed and unobservant grower to confuse root slime and/or subsequent resulting sugars with resin (trichomes). 

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Maybe a newbie and uninitiated grower would think this.  But there is a vast and obvious difference between the bacterial slime that forms on roots and the resulting sugary substance that takes its place once growing conditions are improved/stabilized.  It would take a very uninformed and unobservant grower to confuse root slime and/or subsequent resulting sugars with resin (trichomes). 

Yes. Well put. And why I said his post was an obvious insult. grass is just dripping with insults today. And the drip isn't sugar either. lol

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yep, sure, did you read the post dedicated to you today?  I actually researched your root resins, unlike yourself, and found possible substantiation to your claims. and posted it as such. These drips of sap are sweet, yet they are also not easily soluble in water for thought. The sticky substance according to the article I posted may consist of terpenoids. since terpenoids are often possess medicinal value, I proposed  "Resto, you may be on to something", and I didn't mean your broomstick either. :yahoo-wave:

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