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Medical Marajuana Bills Being Reintroduced This Session!


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. Michigan is reintroducing the MM bills from last session. Call your state reps and senators today and ask them to co sponsor the bills!!!!! I spoke with Lisa Lyons office (sponsor of edibles bill) and Mike Caltons office (sponsor of dispensaries bill) and they are meeting tomorrow morning in committee to discuss them. I also spoke with Sen Rick Jones office about the bills!!

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Senator Rick Jones wants to use these bills to limit the MMMA to the point of total uselessness. This is not a good thing, it's a very bad thing. 

 

Mike Callton, bill sponsor, has already said that a vote for these bills is a vote to kill home grows in our communities.

 

Call your reps and senators and tell them to vote NO on these bills because the final word on them will come from Schuette and The State Police. 

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Thank you for taking action and welcome to 3MA :yahoo-wave:

 

This from Compassion Chronicles this a.m.

 

http://thecompassionchronicles.com/2015/02/11/michigan-legislators-and-canadian-cannabis-a-love-story/

 

Michigan Legislators and Canadian Cannabis: A Love Story 11 Feb, 2015

Rep. Michael Callton tells about the Canadian marijuana distribution system and how those players are wielding influence among Lansing legislators to turn Michigan into Manitoba South.

 

by Rick Thompson/February 11, 2015

LANSING- When it comes to lobbyists hawking Canadian companies and their interests in Michigan’s potential pot market, Rep. Michael Callton’s not mincing words.

“There are a couple of Canadian companies that are (medical marijuana) providers for the country of Canada with very large central grows that have got their eye on us over here. They’ve talked to legislators. They’ve talked to me,” he said during the February 5th broadcast of the Planet Green Trees Radio Show, featuring hosts Michael Komorn, Rick Thompson and Jamie Lowell.

 

At issue is the nature of the supply base in Michigan’s medical marijuana marketplace. Currently any legal medical marijuana growing operation in the state cannot exceed 72 plants, but that model is a poor way for business interests to make serious money growing and selling cannabis to the state’s sick and disabled. The state has approx. 120,000 registered patients and 20,000 Michigan residents called caregivers who are licensed and registered to grow cannabis on their behalf.

Consequently, business interests from around the United States and Canada are lining up to push Lansing legislators to allow mega-sized ‘central grow’ operations containing thousands of marijuana plants, which would be licensed by a select few. Interests have spent hundreds of thousands of dollars to influence Michigan legislators, and Prairie Plant Systems even flew a cadre of lawmakers to a Canadian mega-marijuana growing operation.

Check Out Legal Podcasts at Blog Talk Radio with PlanetGreenTrees on BlogTalkRadio

 

“I do know there are some other legislators writing bills on behalf of some other interests that are interested in ‘central grow,’ but my bill is designed to take the marijuana, to buy it from the caregiver,” Callton said.

 

His bill is known as the Provisioning Centers Act- formerly referred to by House designation HB 4271. Callton is re-introducing his bill for the 2015-16 legislative session during a press conference on Thursday. Who supplies the marijuana sold by the state’s current 150+ semi-legal dispensaries- and the state-sanctioned Provisioning Centers that Callton’s bill would create- is the bone of contention between state-based patient organizations and Lansing lobbyists, including Chuck Perricone and GCSI’s Ken Cole.

 

Perricone represents giant agribusiness entity Prairie Plant Systems from Canada, who successfully pushed the Michigan legislature to pass the Pharmaceutical Grade Marihuana Act in 2013. The bill was expedited through the legislature in a lightning-fast three months thanks to its well-connected pair of sponsors, former Senators Roger Kahn and past Senate Majority Leader Randy Richardville.

Once marijuana is federally removed from Schedule 1 of the Controlled Substances List, the Pharmaceutical Grade Marihuana Act would create a whole new system of marijuana growing and selling in Michigan that  utilizes ‘central grow’-style mega pot plantations and Walmart/Rite-Aid type big box pharmacies for distribution.

 

The whole concept of outsourcing pot growing to foreign interests is the opposite approach from the Provisioning Centers Act. “In my bill,” Callton explained, “it is the intention that (distribution centers) buy their supply as overages from the caregivers. The Provisioning Center is supplied by overage.”

 

Overage is the term used to describe the excess pot created by Michigan residents who qualify to become licensed and registered medical marijuana producers. “A caregiver can grow up to twelve plants for each patient,” Jamie Lowell explained. “If that garden produces more than the patient needs, the caregiver can bring it to a distribution center for use by other patients. Without this system the overages would be diverted into a system that supports the black market and unregistered marijuana users.” The current system in use by dispensaries all across Michigan is to acquire cannabis through the caregiver network, a program that has worked successfully since the medical marijuana program was written into law more than five years ago.

 

Callton outed the Canadians as manipulating the Michigan legislature to achieve a market advantage. Case in point: The Pharmaceutical Grade Marihuana Act, formerly known as Senate Bill 660.

 

“All Senate Bill 660 did was, in the case that marijuana comes off Schedule 1, then it defined a type of product called medical-grade marijuana and what the specifications of that were. This was put forward by Prairie Plant Systems and their lobbyist,” Callton explained. “They did want to compete in that market, and their product would be more expensive. They didn’t want others calling their marijuana medical grade marijuana if it did not reach these specifications, because it would be more expensive.”

 

This information came from first-hand knowledge. “I had a good talk with them. They thought they could compete for 20% of the market approximately based on what they saw in Canada. If there was an open market system, that 20% of the market would pay extra to have this (pharmaceutical) grade. They just wanted to protect the qualifications of that grade so that other growers who weren’t growing at that grade weren’t saying they had medical grade and selling it for (a lower price).”

Senate Bill 660, and the Public Act that came from it, was a thick proposal that articulated permissions for a range of activity which would be protected from prosecution by state authorities and federal agents as well. “It was more than just creating the definition of pharmaceutical-grade cannabis. It envisioned an entire procedure where it was cultivated and distributed. It was a very broad act,” Rick Thompson reminded the Representative and the listeners.

 

“Over in Canada the growers I have met with, basically they have very large grows and they distribute through courier,” Callton said. “They don’t have Provisioning Centers.” Callton describing the Canadian model of medical marijuana government regulation that includes cannabis stored in warehouses, zapped with radiation and then delivered via UPS or Fed Ex to patients nationwide. Michigan’s Pharmaceutical Grade Marihuana Act requires all marijuana distributed via that program to be irradiated prior to sale and consumption by patients, a provision that many advocates detest.

Edited by imiubu
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^^^^ Look at them fighting over the tiny bit of money patients have in their pockets. Shameful to say the least. Figuring ways to divvy up the spoils and the bill isn't even finished being written. That's what happens when you bribe the wrong people for something you will never get from them. It's all bad. We are dealing with the State Police, Schuette, Prairey Plant of Canada, and the dispensary interest that wants it all. There's nothing good coming from any of those interests. 

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Callton outed the Canadians as manipulating the Michigan legislature to achieve a market advantage. Case in point: The Pharmaceutical Grade Marihuana Act, formerly known as Senate Bill 660.

 

The Canadians have already bought the Michigan Legislature and your proof is 660. It's the first move, bought and paid for, and the second move is the dispensary bill.

Edited by Restorium2
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I see there is again no mention of edibles, only commercial sales.  Those seeking profit are catered to and those of us who need non-smokable medicine are reduced to a corollary. Edibles will be legalized only so the dispensaries can sell them.

 

 

http://thecompassionchronicles.com/2015/02/11/michigan-legislators-and-canadian-cannabis-a-love-story/

 

Michigan Legislators and Canadian Cannabis: A Love Story

11 Feb, 2015

 

Rep. Michael Callton tells about the Canadian marijuana distribution system and how those players are wielding influence among Lansing legislators to turn Michigan into Manitoba South

 

by Rick Thompson/February 11, 2015

 

LANSING- When it comes to lobbyists hawking Canadian companies and their interests in Michigan’s potential pot market, Rep. Michael Callton’s not mincing words.

 

“There are a couple of Canadian companies that are (medical marijuana) providers for the country of Canada with very large central grows that have got their eye on us over here. They’ve talked to legislators. They’ve talked to me,” he said during the February 5th broadcast of the Planet Green Trees Radio Show, featuring hosts Michael Komorn, Rick Thompson and Jamie Lowell.

 

At issue is the nature of the supply base in Michigan’s medical marijuana marketplace. Currently any legal medical marijuana growing operation in the state cannot exceed 72 plants, but that model is a poor way for business interests to make serious money growing and selling cannabis to the state’s sick and disabled. The state has approx. 120,000 registered patients and 20,000 Michigan residents called caregivers who are licensed and registered to grow cannabis on their behalf.

 

Consequently, business interests from around the United States and Canada are lining up to push Lansing legislators to allow mega-sized ‘central grow’ operations containing thousands of marijuana plants, which would be licensed by a select few. Interests have spent hundreds of thousands of dollars to influence Michigan legislators, and Prairie Plant Systems even flew a cadre of lawmakers to a Canadian mega-marijuana growing operation.

 

“I do know there are some other legislators writing bills on behalf of some other interests that are interested in ‘central grow,’ but my bill is designed to take the marijuana, to buy it from the caregiver,” Callton said.

 

His bill is known as the Provisioning Centers Act- formerly referred to by House designation HB 4271. Callton is re-introducing his bill for the 2015-16 legislative session during a press conference on Thursday. Who supplies the marijuana sold by the state’s current 150+ semi-legal dispensaries- and the state-sanctioned Provisioning Centers that Callton’s bill would create- is the bone of contention between state-based patient organizations and Lansing lobbyists, including Chuck Perricone and GCSI’s Ken Cole.

 

Perricone represents giant agribusiness entity Prairie Plant Systems from Canada, who successfully pushed the Michigan legislature to pass the Pharmaceutical Grade Marihuana Act in 2013. The bill was expedited through the legislature in a lightning-fast three months thanks to its well-connected pair of sponsors, former Senators Roger Kahn and past Senate Majority Leader Randy Richardville.

Once marijuana is federally removed from Schedule 1 of the Controlled Substances List, the Pharmaceutical Grade Marihuana Act would create a whole new system of marijuana growing and selling in Michigan that  utilizes ‘central grow’-style mega pot plantations and Walmart/Rite-Aid type big box pharmacies for distribution.

 

The whole concept of outsourcing pot growing to foreign interests is the opposite approach from the Provisioning Centers Act. “In my bill,” Callton explained, “it is the intention that (distribution centers) buy their supply as overages from the caregivers. The Provisioning Center is supplied by overage.”

 

Overage is the term used to describe the excess pot created by Michigan residents who qualify to become licensed and registered medical marijuana producers. “A caregiver can grow up to twelve plants for each patient,” Jamie Lowell explained. “If that garden produces more than the patient needs, the caregiver can bring it to a distribution center for use by other patients. Without this system the overages would be diverted into a system that supports the black market and unregistered marijuana users.” The current system in use by dispensaries all across Michigan is to acquire cannabis through the caregiver network, a program that has worked successfully since the medical marijuana program was written into law more than five years ago.

 

Callton outed the Canadians as manipulating the Michigan legislature to achieve a market advantage. Case in point: The Pharmaceutical Grade Marihuana Act, formerly known as Senate Bill 660.

“All Senate Bill 660 did was, in the case that marijuana comes off Schedule 1, then it defined a type of product called medical-grade marijuana and what the specifications of that were. This was put forward by Prairie Plant Systems and their lobbyist,” Callton explained. “They did want to compete in that market, and their product would be more expensive. They didn’t want others calling their marijuana medical grade marijuana if it did not reach these specifications, because it would be more expensive.”

 

This information came from first-hand knowledge. “I had a good talk with them. They thought they could compete for 20% of the market approximately based on what they saw in Canada. If there was an open market system, that 20% of the market would pay extra to have this (pharmaceutical) grade. They just wanted to protect the qualifications of that grade so that other growers who weren’t growing at that grade weren’t saying they had medical grade and selling it for (a lower price).”

 

Senate Bill 660, and the Public Act that came from it, was a thick proposal that articulated permissions for a range of activity which would be protected from prosecution by state authorities and federal agents as well. “It was more than just creating the definition of pharmaceutical-grade cannabis. It envisioned an entire procedure where it was cultivated and distributed. It was a very broad act,” Rick Thompson reminded the Representative and the listeners.

 

“Over in Canada the growers I have met with, basically they have very large grows and they distribute through courier,” Callton said. “They don’t have Provisioning Centers.” Callton describing the Canadian model of medical marijuana government regulation that includes cannabis stored in warehouses, zapped with radiation and then delivered via UPS or Fed Ex to patients nationwide. Michigan’s Pharmaceutical Grade Marihuana Act requires all marijuana distributed via that program to be irradiated prior to sale and consumption by patients, a provision that many advocates detest.

 

 

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Senator Rick Jones wants to use these bills to limit the MMMA to the point of total uselessness. This is not a good thing, it's a very bad thing. 

 

Mike Callton, bill sponsor, has already said that a vote for these bills is a vote to kill home grows in our communities.

 

Call your reps and senators and tell them to vote NO on these bills because the final word on them will come from Schuette and The State Police. 

 

How does the edibles bill kill home grows? Please don't confuse the two, that may be why the edibles didn't pass last time, both bills were lumped together.

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How does the edibles bill kill home grows? Please don't confuse the two, that may be why the edibles didn't pass last time, both bills were lumped together.

Makes no difference because they both 'back door' the Act. When you see who you really are asking it makes no sense to even ask. Our only friend is the Supreme Court. The current legislature has nothing good to offer us because they are beholding to law enforcement and other selfish commercial interests. 

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Makes no difference because they both 'back door' the Act. When you see who you really are asking it makes no sense to even ask. Our only friend is the Supreme Court. The current legislature has nothing good to offer us because they are beholding to law enforcement and other selfish commercial interests. 

How does dispensaries getting their supply from overages kill home grows?  Home grows would be responsible for supplying them then the whole thing would be over?

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The bill sponsor said IN PUBLIC a vote for his bill is a vote to kill home grows. EVERYONE in charge of the wording would like to kill home grows.

Did you ever think it was to push the Sen. to take it to a vote?  Was the quote ever explained?  How would you kill the dispensaries getting it from overages, esp. if things were brought to light and people called or wrote their senators.  You still haven't outlined how they will take home grows.  You think they'll just null the act and get rid of caregivers?  I don't think that would work even with the cops and repubs behind it.  It would be like poking a bees nest.  I think it's a bluff.

 

He may have meant that, with caregivers able to get their overages to a dispensary legally, there would be less patients growing since there would be a better network.  I've never seen the quote in context.  And what's written above seems to deny what you say.

Edited by Norby
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Did you ever think it was to push the Sen. to take it to a vote?  Was the quote ever explained?  How would you kill the dispensaries getting it from overages, esp. if things were brought to light and people called or wrote their senators.  You still haven't outlined how they will take home grows.  You think they'll just null the act and get rid of caregivers?  I don't think that would work even with the cops and repubs behind it.  It would be like poking a bees nest.  I think it's a bluff.

 

He may have meant that, with caregivers able to get their overages to a dispensary legally, there would be less patients growing since there would be a better network.  I've never seen the quote in context.  And what's written above seems to deny what you say.

It was legislator talking plainly to get the votes he wants and giving away our grow rights to do it. You have to look at it in the perspective of who would be voting and why. It's really clear. It was a bargain offered to the voters, the other legislators. Vote for legal dispensaries and home grows will go away. There's no other way to see it. 

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Meekof Wants 'Controlled' Marijuana Distribution System ‏           
 
 
Legislation allowing medical marijuana to be given out through "provisioning centers" died on the last day of lame duck and isn't the preferred delivery method of the Senate Majority Leader going into the first few weeks of the new session.

Speaking at a Michigan Press Association (MPA) legislative forum on Friday, Senate Majority Leader Arlan MEEKHOF (R-West Olive) said the people in his West Michigan community tell him they thought the substance would be delivered to the patients that need it through a controlled mechanism (To listen to other questions from this forum, listen to the MIRS Monday podcast).

That's not what happened, but Meekhof is holding out hope that it can be. 

"If the citizens really believe this is going to be a type of medicine, and I'm not saying it doesn't have medical value because it does, then it needs to be controlled like medicine," he said. 

Other communities across the globe have been able to get their arms around this distribution question, Meekhof said, and said he wasn't opposed to Michigan giving it a try, as well. 

However, whatever Michigan comes up with, Meekhof would prefer a system where pharmacists and doctors are making sure the medical marijuana doesn't react with something else the patient may be taking. 

Meekhof also opinioned that the "social experiment" in Colorado with legalizing marijuana "hasn't gone well" in the sense that surrounding states are picking up the societal costs of out-of-state residents buying marijuana in Colorado and bringing it back to their home states. 

The National Patient Rights Association has scheduled a Thursday press conference with Rep. MikeCALLTON (R-Nashville) to talk about the reintroduction of the bills from last term. 

House Speaker Kevin COTTER (R-Mt. Pleasant) added that Michigan and other states are finding themselves in a tight spot on this issue. Until marijuana is reclassified at the federal level, the controls on how and where medical-grade marijuana can be grown are limited. 

"It can't be grown in your basement," he said. 

So where can it be grown? Cotter didn't have the answers but conceded there is interest in getting the product in the hands of those who need it. 

"We have a mess on our hands and I'm not sure where we go from here." 

Senate Minority Leader Jim ANANICH (D-Flint) said he was hopeful something could be worked out. 

"We have talented people in the caucuses," he said. "I'm hopeful a compromise will be reached so people can get the medicine they need in a way that protects public safety. I think we can get there." 

As far as the legalization question, House Minority Leader Tim GREIMEL (D-Auburn Hills) said Michigan should pause a few years and see what is happening in the other states. 

"Obviously, the voters in the state voted to legalize medical marijuana and, regardless of how one feels, we need to make sure we have the right safeguards in place to protect the public's safety."
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Meekof Wants 'Controlled' Marijuana Distribution System ‏           

"If the citizens really believe this is going to be a type of medicine, and I'm not saying it doesn't have medical value because it does, then it needs to be controlled like medicine," he said. 

 

However, whatever Michigan comes up with, Meekhof would prefer a system where pharmacists and doctors are making sure the medical marijuana doesn't react with something else the patient may be taking. 

its interesting that a person who has experience writing laws, has no making whoopee clue about the laws currently on the books.

 

"Obviously, the voters in the state voted to legalize medical marijuana and, regardless of how one feels, we need to make sure we have the right safeguards in place to protect the public's safety."

yeah! we need to make sure we have the safeguards for the program that is 6 years old now. its been so unsafe for the past 6 years. marijuana killed 37 people last week! help us, Tim GREIMEL, you're our only hope!

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Senate Majority Leader Arlan[/color]MEEKHOF (R-West Olive) said the people in his West Michigan community tell him they thought the substance would be delivered to the patients that need it through a controlled mechanism

anyone want to FOIA this one? lol. someone in west olive really said that?

Edited by t-pain
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anyone want to FOIA this one? lol. someone in west olive really said that?

You know they didn't and so does he.

 

The dispensary owners are drooling at the prospect of knocking out the caregiver model charging $20 a gram for medicine $75 for a 1/8th way more pricey than the $50 -$60 I charge for a 1/4 ounce I foresee a ton of current patients going back to the black market if this occurs how does that promote public safety sending some poor cancer patient into the hood looking for their medicine?

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