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Poor Quality Autoflowers Abound...


pic book
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This latest is from Dinafem.  They call it deep cheese, aka XXX Cheese.  Odor is heavy cheese, but i have to stick my nose in the bud to get any scent.  I germinated the beans Dec. 22, and kept plants in 20 gal. under 1000 watts hid.  Plants now measures 2 x 2 with an even and uniform canopy that grew naturally and is composed of 5 branches of equal height.  I'll give it this, XXX is beautiful morphologically; but is such a budding disappointment.   Its buds just hang there and won't develop any further. Tonight, after 111 days of 24/0, the last 40 days sitting still, it joined the regulars under 12/12, before it joins the trash, which is where Dinafem can put this strain far as I'm concerned...The money, the time wasted.....DAMMMN DINAFEM!

Right next to it all  long has been a Sweetskunk regular, also from Dinafem, also germed Dec 22, and it shows exact the same 'stasis' budding, attempted, but arrested in development.  Its scent makes my mouth water, but my practical side says Dinafem is slinging some trash, wasting my time and money and making me their guinea pig---for absolutely no gain.   They need to use testers!!!

I'm so disappointed.  I could have had a great experience--certainly better-- if i'd blindfolded myself and threw darts to pick any two of doc greenthumb's offerings in place of these equally expensive, incomplete experiments that leave me only disappointed--like I kissed my sister and she was a boy.

Dinafem goes down as so revolting....schitttt.

Two thirds of my hours are spent growing, I looooove it, but Dinafem has no future with me.  Unless they are the only purveryors of a "must have" strain, they are forever off my list.

Edited by pic book
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Natural?  Natural?  Is that even tangientially relevant?  Natural?  To run a uniform photoperiod caused by timers?  To grow inside of houses?  To adjust ph and ppm electronically and maintain them with tech gear?  To select landrace species from all over the world and cross 5 or 6 to each other to make new never-before-known-strains that nature left to its own devices might combabulate in a trillion years of lucky winds?  I'm sure there are other examples, but to me, to use 'natural' as criteria is irrelevant.  Most cannabis is produced, is farmed, un-naturally...

autos are made with colloidal silver, are made fem through manipulation, like all fems--auto or regular, not natural, is it?

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Natural?  Natural?  Is that even tangientially relevant?  Natural?  To run a uniform photoperiod caused by timers?  To grow inside of houses?  To adjust ph and ppm electronically and maintain them with tech gear?  To select landrace species from all over the world and cross 5 or 6 to each other to make new never-before-known-strains that nature left to its own devices might combabulate in a trillion years of lucky winds?  I'm sure there are other examples, but to me, to use 'natural' as criteria is irrelevant.  Most cannabis is produced, is farmed, un-naturally...

autos are made with colloidal silver, are made fem through manipulation, like all fems--auto or regular, not natural, is it?

 

O K . . . How's this then ?

Auto flowers are as useful as breasts on a bull . . . a waste of time that you will never get back .

 

 

 

Of course , this is just my opinion .

:))

Edited by knucklehead bob
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auto flowers are a hybridization of industrial hemp and your favorite strains. They are not made with colloidal silver.   It is possible to hybridize these two naturally in open air.

Hemp needs no photo period change to finish, a stellar trait for the farmers.

I've grown once of those  dinafems , The cheese one, in the past and they were stinky azz little girls that packed a full effect as any other good auto I've sampled.

I also put them in 12/12 after half finished, but have had no issue in 24/7, except logistical plant placement.

I've seen plants fail for many reasons in a grow room, but never had a dinafem putz out on me sorry you had this issue.

 

 

The autos in my garden are for observation, free seed disposal, and novelty only. I usually don't like the heady couchy feel around here, but Joint Doctor makes some off the chart hybrids too.

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Huh!  I thought auto-flowering plants are ruderalis hybrids.  :huh:

you are correct. whats the confusion?

 

Cannabis ruderalis has a lower THC content than either C. sativa or C. indica, so it is rarely grown for recreational use and the shorter stature of C. ruderalis limits its application for hemp production. Many first time cannabis producers grow autoflowering varieties due to the relatively short time required for the plants to grow sufficiently to be harvested. Cannabis ruderalis strains are high in the cannabіnoid cannabidiol, so they are grown by some medical marijuana users.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cannabis_ruderalis

 

interesting bit;

 

Ruderalis is described as a near-wild or feral sub-species of cannabis. All the sub-species, sativa, indica and ruderalis, readily interbreed. Ruderalis is characterized by autoflowering--it produces flowers along the stems and branches based on life cycle rather than light regimen. Ruderalis is found along the northern plateaus of Russia and the countries to its east.

 

Outdoors, ruderalis plant continues to flower throughout its development, and produces colas and buds in late August, near the end of its traditional short growing season. The problem with ruderalis and with its hybrids and most ruderalis backcrosses to other varieties is that the buds don't ripen. The stigmas turn brown but the ovary behind them doesn't swell. The "high" from pure ruderalis plants is more like a buzz that could become a headache, but the crosses sometimes produce respectable highs.

 

Once the plants begin autoflowering, change the lights to a regime of 10 hours of darkness to 14 hours of light. My reasoning is that at the northern latitudes where ruderalis grows, there is more than 14 hours of light in mid-August when it begins to develop colas. Unfortunately, the ruderalis genetics may also produce buds that never fully mature. On the other hand, maybe autoflowering is the only characteristic that this strain has inherited from the ruderalis in its family tree-the cross may have introduced genetics that yield properly matured buds with an enjoyable effect. There is only one way to find out, and that is to complete the growing cycle and test the results.

 

 

ed Rosenthal has the experience as pic book with undeveloped flowers. I've never seen this personally, and only just know heard of it. Thanks pic book.

sounds like you got a dud seed in the pack. avoid autos for bet results imo

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What's the advantage of auto flower? Maybe for the seed companies, you can't clone them, you have to buy more seeds.

I think the big attraction to auto flowers in Michigan right now is the hope to grow outdoors and have plants that are inconspicuous (they aren't very tall when mature) and that finish well before LEO is looking for outdoor grows. Growing outdoors off-radar is the only good reason I see for folks growing auto flowering plants.

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I'm not confused!  Hemp is not ruderalis obviously...

what of the Wikipedia link saying that ruderalis "ruderalis limits its application for hemp production"

 

and this :Cannabis Ruderalis is a subspecies of Cannabis Sativa. The term was originally used in the former Soviet Union to describe the varieties of hemp that had escaped cultivation and adapted to the surrounding region.

 

and this "Similar Ruderalis populations can be found in most of the areas where hemp cultivation was once prevalent. The most notable region in North America is the midwest, though populations occur sporadically throughout the United States and Canada. Without the human hand aiding in selection, these plants have lost many of the traits they were originally selected for, and have acclimatized to their locale." from cannabis culture?

 

I don't claim to know anything, but those articles convinced me that ruderalis is hemp.

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what of the Wikipedia link saying that ruderalis "ruderalis limits its application for hemp production"

 

and this :Cannabis Ruderalis is a subspecies of Cannabis Sativa. The term was originally used in the former Soviet Union to describe the varieties of hemp that had escaped cultivation and adapted to the surrounding region.

 

and this "Similar Ruderalis populations can be found in most of the areas where hemp cultivation was once prevalent. The most notable region in North America is the midwest, though populations occur sporadically throughout the United States and Canada. Without the human hand aiding in selection, these plants have lost many of the traits they were originally selected for, and have acclimatized to their locale." from cannabis culture?

 

I don't claim to know anything, but those articles convinced me that ruderalis is hemp.

 

Descended from hemp, I'll buy that.  Certainly anything considered ruderalis cannot be called industrial hemp at this stage of development (devolution.)  Limits application i.e. "is not really useful for."  Little ruderalis bushes would be a poor choice for fiber production I'm guessing.  They would be dwarfed by their long, lanky progenitors.

Edited by MightyMightyMezz
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I think the big attraction to auto flowers in Michigan right now is the hope to grow outdoors and have plants that are inconspicuous (they aren't very tall when mature) and that finish well before LEO is looking for outdoor grows. Growing outdoors off-radar is the only good reason I see for folks growing auto flowering plants.

 

I've grown them on the patio with little fuss, and they do fine under simple cfl bulbs cheaply. For the novelty, and the dreams of fast harvest I suspect are reasons to grow. I find them a general waste of dirt, but still chuck a few. I've successfully culture cloned the auto flower from santa marta joint doctor strain so I dont have to buy seeds. When I receive freebie auto's today they get tossed to the birds, they don't mind the headache form the industrial strength cultivar

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Descended from hemp, I'll buy that.  Certainly anything considered ruderalis cannot be called industrial hemp at this stage of development.  Limits application i.e. "is not really used for."  Little ruderalis bushes would be a poor choice for fiber production I'm guessing.  They would be dwarfed by their long, lanky progenitors.

let's not forget this "The term was originally used in the former Soviet Union to describe the varieties of hemp that had escaped cultivation and adapted to the surrounding region." from the dictionary....

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let's not forget this "The term was originally used in the former Soviet Union to describe the varieties of hemp that had escaped cultivation and adapted to the surrounding region." from the dictionary....

 

Lol, the important part is what you didn't highlight.  Escaped and adapted.  I said I'll buy it, grass.  :)

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I just learned some great stuff MMM, about hemp and varieties and hybrids. It seems that ruderalis is a hybrid not a strain, according to its dna. You are correct though, it has not often been exploited in our regions until recently.

here's one of the best blips I found on the subject in the article by seedsman

 

"One of the most famous is FIN-314. Better known as Finola, it is an autoflowering hemp strain developed in 1995 for commercial crop growing in Finland (making it suitable for the rest of Scandinavia and other northern countries such as Canada). Its THC concentration is limited to a level acceptable to the government. Above 0.3%, it is classified as a drug. Although these plants contain very little THC, they are rich in CBD and may have some medicinal uses. Russian ruderalis has also been successfully transformed into industrial hemp strains which are grown for fibre, seed and oil. http://www.seedsman.com/en/cannabis-ruderalis

 

I urge anyone growing outdoors to induce flower mid/end summer to finish properly with little issues. I did it here successfully so I know it works well. I wish I could control the smells outdoors though.

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I just learned some great stuff MMM, about hemp and varieties and hybrids. It seems that ruderalis is a hybrid not a strain, according to its dna. You are correct though, it has not often been exploited in our regions until recently.

here's one of the best blips I found on the subject in the article by seedsman

 

"One of the most famous is FIN-314. Better known as Finola, it is an autoflowering hemp strain developed in 1995 for commercial crop growing in Finland (making it suitable for the rest of Scandinavia and other northern countries such as Canada). Its THC concentration is limited to a level acceptable to the government. Above 0.3%, it is classified as a drug. Although these plants contain very little THC, they are rich in CBD and may have some medicinal uses. Russian ruderalis has also been successfully transformed into industrial hemp strains which are grown for fibre, seed and oil. http://www.seedsman.com/en/cannabis-ruderalis

 

I urge anyone growing outdoors to induce flower mid/end summer to finish properly with little issues. I did it here successfully so I know it works well. I wish I could control the smells outdoors though.

 

 

It's a whole subspecies not a strain!  Cannabis sativa ruderalis.  But I'd be interested to hear about the hybrid DNA.  The very first plant I ever grew in 1990 was a Ruderalis x Indica.  Everyone thought it was pretty focking great at that time.  Don't know if it was auto or not because I flowered it like a regular plant indoors. 

 

The Sensi Seeds catalog from 1989 had it.  All I knew about it was what was said in the catalog - some background on ruderalis, crossed with potent indica, 50% of individuals will have the auto-flowering trait. 

Edited by MightyMightyMezz
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