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Washington, D.C. -- If you're going to wage war on drugs, you need to be outfitted like a warrior.

 

That seems to be the rationale behind hundreds of police department requests for armored trucks submitted to the Pentagon between 2012 and 2014. The requests, unearthed in a FOIA request by Mother Jones magazine, shed light on how the war on drugs has directly contributed to the militarization of local police forces in recent years.

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I didn't see it mentioned in the above articles/links but I have read before that this equipment must be used once per year.  If not, it has to be returned to the feds.

 

That might explain why we see such ridiculous overkill by the police in many of these low level raids.  Use it or lose it, so they use it, endangering the public.  They are practicing on us, using deadly toys, just in case they ever really need to use the equipment against dangerous crooks

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"In police work there are times we have to become soldiers and control through force and fear,"

 

 

Bullshet!!!

 

 And there we have the problem with police summed up quickly.  Police are not soldiers. Period. I have thought for many years no military person should be allowed to be a police officer. One or the other.

 

When it becomes too dangerous for police forces in some circumstances(disasters, massive rioting etc) that is what the National Guard is for, which is military.  A police officer that thinks they are a soldier needs to be fired immediately.

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Also, police act like they have themost dangerous job.

 

 Not even close.

 

It is more dangerous to be a pizza delivery driver than a police officer.

 

 Iron workers have more dangerous jobs. Truck drivers. Lumber workers. Commercial fishing. Animal care workers. Firefighters. Miners. High wire electric workers.

 

I am sick of police whining how dangerous their jobs are.

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  • 4 months later...

Also, police act like they have themost dangerous job.

 

 Not even close.

 

It is more dangerous to be a pizza delivery driver than a police officer.

 

 Iron workers have more dangerous jobs. Truck drivers. Lumber workers. Commercial fishing. Animal care workers. Firefighters. Miners. High wire electric workers.

 

I am sick of police whining how dangerous their jobs are.

 

I agree. There's a huge list of much more dangerous jobs. Heck, even an EMT has it worse.

 

I would love to approach a police car I see parked by the side of the road every day looking for people speeding. Get out and ask the cop(s) inside if they have anything better to do? Give him a broom and tell him to sweep the road if he's just going to sit on his fat butt all day, at MY expense. But I would never disrespect a policeman like that. They are there to serve and protect. And harass and intimidate. Yes, they have it rough.....

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exactly! ^^   "Look Busy " I'd say, "everyone is watching you."  They rest around until  they suspect a crime is being committed, or a call to go somewhere else comes in. There are unsolved crimes to be working on while waiting for more crimes to happen ya know!

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