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Cancer And Mushrooms


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I've noticed a lot of the same terpenes found in MJ also in mushrooms.  Beta myrcene, pinene, chlorophyllene, etc.  Most mushrooms have anticancer polysaccharides in them.  From what I've gathered the polysaccharides weaken the cancer cells to make them more susceptible to chemo and radiation. They also have immunomodulators in them which boosts the immune system during times like chemo and depresses the immune system if it is attacking the body as in Chron's and UC, arthritis etc.  It boosts the natural killer cells to attack the cancer cells too.

  They are also filled with antioxidants  and antiinflammatories, taking away 2 ways in which cancer forms.

A bunch of them are common to Michigan.  Chaga is found on Birch and can be collected throughout the year, even in winter, one of the only mushrooms that still has it's medicinal properties thru the winter.  The others have to be collected when they are actively growing.  There are 4 Ganoderma species in Michigan with loads of medicinal properties.  Turkey Tail is the most studied mushroom for medicinal properties and actually kills cancer cells itself.  It is prescribed as an adjunct to chemo and radiation and has had cases of curing cancer without radiation and chemo.  Hen of the Woods, which may be up now, is most known for it's antidiabetic and antiinflammatory properties also helps in the fight against cancer.

  Even Shiitake are reported to have immunostimulating properties in the fight against cancer.  Some also have vasodilator qualities good for atherosclerosis.  The antivirals in a lot of mushrooms can inactivate or kill HPV and aids, the former cutting off one way that cancer forms, thru virus'.

 

I'm not sure if mushrooms would weaken the cancer cells making them more susceptible to apoptosis thru MJ oil regimen but it seems that there is research that may lead to a better formula for beating cancer.  I recommend doing research and adding the right mushrooms into the regimen since different mushrooms work well on different cancers and some work well in adjunct for any cancer.

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Kawaratake is the Japanese name for Turkey Tail - Trametes versicolor(polyporus or coriolis versicolor in China and Japan) meaning mushroom of the riverbank or Yun zhi or rain cloud mushroom in China. PSK or polysaccharide k is the most active ingredient and available as an adjunct therapy to chemo or radiation.

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man, i have the lowest plot in all of ingham. What can should i do to promote growth? I think my dinky yard as actually a prime spot.

 

I grew up in morel country and picked many pounds each season as a kid. Grew into picking chantrelles and lobsters out west as i aged with the good old years, but what can i do with my wet yard? looking forward to your advice, norb.

 

tons of leaf mold, tons of wood,......???? i hate fungus right now

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Fungus is your friend. :)

I've got Blewits coming up in the yard now.  I've heard they produce great on yard waste. 

You could always get a few hardwood posts and drill in some plugs for Oysters or Shiitake and post hole them into the ground a foot.

You could build up beds and do King strophoria.  Those mushrooms get up to 5 lbs. or more.  You need to prepare a mulch bed for them.  you could do a lot of different mushrooms on mulch beds, morels, oysters and others.

http://www.mushroommountain.com/_files/pdf/Wood%20Chip%20and%20Compost%20Bed%20Preparation.pdf

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Hen of the Woods - Grifola frondosa.  Keep your eye out on the base of oaks.  They are out now although not many as it was a dry fall.

 

 

Fungus is your friend. :)

I've got Blewits coming up in the yard now.  I've heard they produce great on yard waste. 

You could always get a few hardwood posts and drill in some plugs for Oysters or Shiitake and post hole them into the ground a foot.

You could build up beds and do King strophoria.  Those mushrooms get up to 5 lbs. or more.  You need to prepare a mulch bed for them.  you could do a lot of different mushrooms on mulch beds, morels, oysters and others.

http://www.mushroommountain.com/_files/pdf/Wood%20Chip%20and%20Compost%20Bed%20Preparation.pdf

I've been growing several Shiitake species for a while now.  I wouldn't "post" the logs.  They produce best if you can move them around for soaking, fruiting, and laying (resting) or running (waiting for the mycelium to colonize the log).  It's a fairly easy hobby and compliments my grow rooms as well by outgassing CO2 during the run.  The preferred temps mesh nicely and 18" logs fit in nicely.  I'm thinking of selling the logs at a local farmers market this spring to make room for some fresh stock.  They've been producing between two to three flushes a year so far and last four or five years.

 

I've also harvested wild 'shrooms for decades.  Still have a nice stash of dry Maitake slices from a couple of years back. Spawn is available but harder to cultivate than Shiitakes. I inoculated a maple stump at a friend farm three years ago. Maybe in another year, or more likely two, it MIGHT bloom.

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