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Michael Komorn

Tampa doctor uses medical marijuana to treat patients with autism

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The autism petition has been approved by the Michigan Medical Marijuana Review Panel on 5-4-2018 and has been sent to the Director of LARA for a final decision to add the condition to the qualifying conditions for the Medical Marihuana Program. 

In the mean time, physicians in other states use medical marijuana to treat autistic patients already.

 

http://www.wfla.com/community/health/tampa-doctor-uses-medical-marijuana-to-treat-patients-with-autism/1153159741

Quote

Tampa doctor uses medical marijuana to treat patients with autism

By: Gayle Guyardo 
Updated: May 02, 2018 08:28 AM EDT
 
TAMPA, Fla. (WFLA) - Florida doctors are making great strides in treating patients with medical marijuana, but that hasn't been easy.

Even though the law passed allowing such treatment was overwhelmingly supported by Florida voters, loopholes and red tape have kept patients from receiving treatment.

So a Florida doctor hung up his white coat and made several trips to Tallahassee to help educate law makers, and change is happening now.

"We've put close to a 1,000 patients into the state registry," said Dr. David Berger.

From seizures to PTSD, and even helping those on the Autism spectrum, Berger is now able to help patients in need.

"We are getting fantastic feedback. Quite honestly, I don't have any other single treatment that I've done in my entire medical practice in the last 20 years that I have seen gotten more feedback that it's helping and that it's being tolerated," said Berger.

Many of Dr. Bergers patients are treated without THC, the ingredient that makes people feel high.

When asked why he would take time away from his busy practice to educate law makers and other doctors he said, "I became a physician because I want to help people. For me, there was never another thought besides doing this."

While there are a few wrinkles that need to be hashed out, Dr. Berger is pleased with treatment option currently available.

Today, he continues to work alongside other health care professionals to continue educating the public and the medical world about the benefits of medical cannabis. 

 

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