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Well im adjusting  to two 1500 panels and don't want to fry my  girls so im thinking a light meter will help me better determine  where the panels should hang above  the top of the plants.

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I bought the hydrofarm hand held quantum par meter and found that there are a number of issues with trying to measure par.

First is the accuracy of the meter.  I saw online that the majority of par meters go for 300-500 and the hydro farm unit is 100-150.   At this point I am not confident in the accuracy.  My interest was in trying to come up with some objective decision point as to when my gavita bulbs need changing.    I measured 8 new ones and my 8 year old ones to create a baseline.    I also experimented with changing out the reflector (Gavita claims the aluminum gets so hot it oxidizes and needs to be changed with the bulb).  It made a slight difference.   The reason for my lack of confidence in the accuracy of the meter is I am getting readings in the 1500 to 1000 range and there is no reports of numbers that high in any of the literature.   That said I just want to compare new vs. old so "absolute accuracy was not a problem, but it would be nice.

The second issue with a hand held is positioning.  A slight tilt in your hand held probe yields significant differences in readings.  Also you want repeatable locations.   I ended up setting a series of screws in the ceiling at different distances from the bulb and mounting the probe on a stick (end of the stick fit over the screw) so that I was always in the same location for every measurement going forward.   Most of the magazine reviews you see of lamps use a grid that is laid on the floor and they then create a series of reading on the grid.   This is a nice lab approach, but I used the ceiling as my measuring point since I wanted to be able to measure with plants present and using the floor was just impractical.

Anyway, hope my personal experience helps with your plans going forward.

 

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I have the hydro farm but it measures candles to watts. I love it ,, has a 10x feature for HID and 5x for low outputs. cost was 90.00 ebay. seems accurate for HID not sure it measures par but can likely be converted..

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On 5/15/2019 at 9:28 PM, Kingdiamond said:

Well im adjusting  to two 1500 panels and don't want to fry my  girls so im thinking a light meter will help me better determine  where the panels should hang above  the top of the plants.

You can treat these like you would an air cooled 1000 HPS. Same distance to tops.

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On 5/16/2019 at 10:41 AM, semicaregiver said:

I bought the hydrofarm hand held quantum par meter and found that there are a number of issues with trying to measure par.

First is the accuracy of the meter.  I saw online that the majority of par meters go for 300-500 and the hydro farm unit is 100-150.   At this point I am not confident in the accuracy.  My interest was in trying to come up with some objective decision point as to when my gavita bulbs need changing.    I measured 8 new ones and my 8 year old ones to create a baseline.    I also experimented with changing out the reflector (Gavita claims the aluminum gets so hot it oxidizes and needs to be changed with the bulb).  It made a slight difference.   The reason for my lack of confidence in the accuracy of the meter is I am getting readings in the 1500 to 1000 range and there is no reports of numbers that high in any of the literature.   That said I just want to compare new vs. old so "absolute accuracy was not a problem, but it would be nice.

The second issue with a hand held is positioning.  A slight tilt in your hand held probe yields significant differences in readings.  Also you want repeatable locations.   I ended up setting a series of screws in the ceiling at different distances from the bulb and mounting the probe on a stick (end of the stick fit over the screw) so that I was always in the same location for every measurement going forward.   Most of the magazine reviews you see of lamps use a grid that is laid on the floor and they then create a series of reading on the grid.   This is a nice lab approach, but I used the ceiling as my measuring point since I wanted to be able to measure with plants present and using the floor was just impractical.

Anyway, hope my personal experience helps with your plans going forward.

 

I have been using the hydrofarm PAR meter for almost a year now and it works perfectly.

These meters work for the experienced grower who understands how the lights they have been using work with the plants they have been growing.

The experienced grower has tried everything as far as light distance and plant growth with their HID lighting. They know what their plants like.

These meters put numbers to results so you can cross reference to new sources of lighting, like LED. 

Use your experience as a baseline and then put numbers to what has worked for you.

Write it all down as a reference and you will be able to switch lights without so much guess work.

 

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I just bought 4 Yehsence lights on Amazon (recommendation from Resto).  Cost was about $580, and the products should be at my door Friday.  Based on KD's and Resto's experience/recommendations, I'm very excited about this transition.  I'll give some updates as things progress.  If the new lights do what they are said to do, between lighting and AC costs, these LED lights will pay for themselves before labor day.

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2 hours ago, Highlander said:

I just bought 4 Yehsence lights on Amazon (recommendation from Resto).  Cost was about $580, and the products should be at my door Friday.  Based on KD's and Resto's experience/recommendations, I'm very excited about this transition.  I'll give some updates as things progress.  If the new lights do what they are said to do, between lighting and AC costs, these LED lights will pay for themselves before labor day.

I was close to purchasing a Yehsence but shutting down the grow for summer. I will make a decision later on before winter after updates from you and others. Thanks

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On 5/15/2019 at 9:28 PM, Kingdiamond said:

Well im adjusting  to two 1500 panels and don't want to fry my  girls so im thinking a light meter will help me better determine  where the panels should hang above  the top of the plants.

I'm finding that about 12" is perfect for when the buds are growing rapidly. 

The HEAT is GONE!!!! WOOHOO! 

Can't believe how cool my rooms are now. What a freakin' relief!!

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Well, I received the 4 new lights on Friday and replaced my veg room lights.  (1,000w MH and 8-4' T5) over about 20-25 square feet with one Yehsense 1500.  (I usually only use 1,000w MH in my veg room, but at the moment, my perpetual grow is a bit heavier on the veg phase than usual)  I'm starting out with both the veg and bloom switches on because I have a hard time believing that just the veg option is enough light for my space.  Depending on growth rates and plant health (should be apparent within a few days) I might install a second light and then just run both on the veg switch in my veg room.  So far, things look fine.

My one complaint so far is that the power cord is very short and it appears that there was a miscommunication because I thought I'd be getting 220v cords.  I have some 220v cords I can use, but I'm going to need more length, so while I figure that out, I'm unable to use these in the flower room.  Bummer.  So I either have to find or make 220v extension cords or rewire my 220v (8 plug) switch to extend it closer to where the lights hang (which will be a pain).   Or, I could run them on 110v volt circuits because my amperage needs will be dropping about 75% and don't really need to be running lights at 220v at this time (if ever again).  No big deal.  I'll adapt.

So I have some decisions to make and work to do, but it's always fun to figure-out new equipment/technology for one's indoor garden.  The continual learning/improvement is part of what makes this so much fun.

I appreciate Resto and KD taking the plunge and reporting back to the community.  I used LEDs years ago with poor success and would not have gone back had they not shared their experience.  If/when these lights work as promised, consider this:  I bought the four Yehsence lights on Amazon for just under $600.  I signed-up for a new Amazon credit account, so I'm getting 6 months with no payments and no interest.  By my calculations, my electricity savings on lights alone will be about $200/month.  That doesn't include the probably additional $100/month saved by less need for AC and not having to run my RDWC chillers as much.  So, I'll have saved about $1,800 by the time I even have to pay for these lights.  It's almost like Amazon is paying me $1,200 and giving me four new LED fixtures for free.

It's getting hard to see the downside.  But, the harvests will tell all.  Like KD, I'll probably still run some HPS in flower during this transition.  

 

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I am looking forward to seeing how this works out for everyone.    

What makes this particularly interesting is the price point.   I have read lots of forums and talked to many growers over the years and I came to the conclusion that the cost of the light units was too  high to justify switching.  This seemed particularly crucial when all of the suppliers have only been in business for a couple of years and there was no warm fuzzy feeling that they will still be in business two or three years from now when I might need some repairs to their proprietary circuit boards or leds.   Now at a cost of less than $150 they are the price of two HPS bulbs.   

One thing that puzzles me is the two price points in the marketplace.   You have Yehsense and several other suppliers at around $150 and then you have another group at $500-1,000 for units that purport to have roughly the same input wattage and output par.   Is the manufacturing quality the difference?  Cheap led's that will go bad sooner?   Corners cut on cooling design?  

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