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7 minutes ago, Restorium2 said:

When you brought up bagseed we were talking about two different things. Bagseed isn't breeding at all. You are off on a tangent. 

 

 

You were talking about Chem d, it was a bag seed. An accident, I was not on a tangent.

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Just looks like a plant that isn't going to stretch much given the time of year it is.  That's not a bad thing. The plant has a really nice structure. You have done well. 

You won't know until you try it. Large doesn't necessarily mean weak. Some strains like Big Bud were bred for size and weren't as strong as some of the other strains. They have since come up with some

BrianVegsTops Hey nice looking plant. You do the stem rub she put some Stank on it? I hope so Your doing fine Bro LST is a good technique. Every seed is an Individual and capable of showing recen

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1 minute ago, glued gorilla said:

I'm not arguing that breeding does take work. Most breeders now are breading poly hybrids with poly hybrids.  These seeds are not even really true F1s. True F1s are from stable stock, and produce similar phenotypes, but are unstable to breed with.I this is how breeders used to make seeds, and in a single pack it was much easier to find a "keeper", and there were far fewer hermaphrodites. Quality breeders would also work their lines into IBLs that could be bred with.  I  have read lots on breeding from breeders, and from books on genetics, not just cannabis.

 

The strains you call the "originals" really were just accidents though. The whole chem fam came from bag seed.

Once you understand breeding you can cut right through that stoner bagseed story and understand that it was the breeder that made Dogbud that was the true breeder that deserves the credit. 

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1 minute ago, glued gorilla said:

You were talking about Chem d, it was a bag seed. An accident, I was not on a tangent.

You would rather believe in an 'accident' than give a breeder credit.

How much credit do you give a 17 year old stoner who found some seeds out of a bag compared to the breeder that produced the strain in the first place? 

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Just now, Restorium2 said:

The whole chem family came from an excellent Colorado breeder that kept to himself. 

Believe what you want, but that's not what the people involved say. It was an accident, nobody knew where the pollen came from, call it unintentional breeding if you want. But, the chem was not breed with purpose, it was a great accident, but that is what it was. This has taken up way too much of my time and space in  this thread. I am done! Have a nice day!

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17 minutes ago, Restorium2 said:

 

Once you understand breeding you can cut right through that stoner bagseed story and understand that it was the breeder that made Dogbud that was the true breeder that deserves the credit. 

I missed this comment. I do agree on that, but the chem family was an accident. An accident that would not have happened without Dogbud, which we know nothing about. So yes, whomever was responsible for Dogbud, does deserve credit.

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When you dig down deep all the originals are someone's life's work. Of course they are. Because they wouldn't be still around otherwise.  It takes a lot of time to make a stable strain that good. They never did produce great though. And they are harder to grow than the crosses. They do not fit with an agenda to make a ton of money. So then comes the cross breeders that are not willing to spend their life on it, they just want fast cash and something to lie for money about. That's why none of them measure up. 

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1 minute ago, BrianVegTops said:

Every day I wake up hoping to see that my plant has started flowering nope not yet today

One thing to really look out for is light pollution.  If you are growing near any yard lights make sure their light is blocked from reaching the plant. If there's light pollution she will never bud. 

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BrianVegsTops

Hey nice looking plant. You do the stem rub she put some Stank on it? I hope so Your doing fine Bro LST is a good technique. Every seed is an Individual and capable of showing recent parentage to 2000 years ago. Yeah I give props to Breeders but this plant has been harvested by man for a long time. HOPE SHES A KEEPER!!

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1 hour ago, Restorium2 said:

One thing to really look out for is light pollution.  If you are growing near any yard lights make sure their light is blocked from reaching the plant. If there's light pollution she will never bud. 

Wow! This actually never dawned on me. I do have 3 small led yard lights in my back yard. Usually one is within 10-15 feet of my plant. I’ll take them out today

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37 minutes ago, rambozo420 said:

BrianVegsTops

Hey nice looking plant. You do the stem rub she put some Stank on it? I hope so Your doing fine Bro LST is a good technique. Every seed is an Individual and capable of showing recent parentage to 2000 years ago. Yeah I give props to Breeders but this plant has been harvested by man for a long time. HOPE SHES A KEEPER!!

Not sure about the rub technique. Can you give a few tips

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10000 comedians Out of work Your trying to be funny? In case your earnest Thumb and forefinger top 1/3 rd of plant rub stem with moderate pressure and let the oderiforous pheromones fly

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11 hours ago, BrianVegTops said:

Wow! This actually never dawned on me. I do have 3 small led yard lights in my back yard. Usually one is within 10-15 feet of my plant. I’ll take them out today

You would have went right to frost with no buds. Or buds just on the side the light doesn't hit. Now give it two weeks and you will see buds. 

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Just now, BrianVegTops said:

Thank you for taking the time out of your day to give a beginner a few tips I do appreciate it

You are very welcome!  This is one of those rare times when I actually could help someone. Most times on the internet everything gets all fogged up and I can't help anyone. What you said here means a lot to me and I appreciate it. 

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I wouldn't worry. Some strains take longer than others. I'm partial to sativas and some of them have real long cycles. Nor would I worry too much about light exposure. If you have bright lights shining on them all night it might create a problem but incidental light is generally OK. Unless you are growing a strain that comes from a world with no moon.

As far as time left you should be OK. I've found that the biggest drawback to growing outside is mold. When the fall rains come and the sun doesn't dry the buds out they tend to mold many times.

Since you're growing in pots you can always take them indoors if you expect a killing frost. I've harvested plants with snow on them in the past and they turned out good.

You can force bloom by covering the plant so it gets no more than 12 hours of sunlight but I would just let nature take it's course.

In my experience the hardest thing for beginners is not harvesting too early. Newbies frequently jump the gun and chop before the buds are ready. Relax! Nature has been handling things for quite a while now and knows what's best.

Plus if there is someone growing nearby you may find she has some seeds provided by pollination. You might end up with your very own hybrid.

Edited by Wild Bill
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2 hours ago, Wild Bill said:

I wouldn't worry. Some strains take longer than others. I'm partial to sativas and some of them have real long cycles. Nor would I worry too much about light exposure. If you have bright lights shining on them all night it might create a problem but incidental light is generally OK. Unless you are growing a strain that comes from a world with no moon.

As far as time left you should be OK. I've found that the biggest drawback to growing outside is mold. When the fall rains come and the sun doesn't dry the buds out they tend to mold many times.

Since you're growing in pots you can always take them indoors if you expect a killing frost. I've harvested plants with snow on them in the past and they turned out good.

You can force bloom by covering the plant so it gets no more than 12 hours of sunlight but I would just let nature take it's course.

In my experience the hardest thing for beginners is not harvesting too early. Newbies frequently jump the gun and chop before the buds are ready. Relax! Nature has been handling things for quite a while now and knows what's best.

Plus if there is someone growing nearby you may find she has some seeds provided by pollination. You might end up with your very own hybrid.

Last year. Big LED yard light on my barn. No buds on one side of plants facing the light. First hand experience I shared. Terrible thing. Nice to be able to help someone after having that loss. 

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On 8/12/2020 at 3:37 PM, BrianVegTops said:

I’m getting worried now. Still has not started showing buds / flowering. Do I have enough season left?!

Two weeks after you found a dark spot. Then figure on at least 6 weeks before harvest. 8 would be better. From the looks of the weather forecast for this fall it looks good into October. 

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23 hours ago, Wild Bill said:

I wouldn't worry. Some strains take longer than others. I'm partial to sativas and some of them have real long cycles. Nor would I worry too much about light exposure. If you have bright lights shining on them all night it might create a problem but incidental light is generally OK. Unless you are growing a strain that comes from a world with no moon.

This is just for you Wild Bill.

We had a really nice hydrangea plant that quit flowering. I researched why it would be doing that and came up with a few ideas that turned out to be not the problem. It's planted next to the pool. Always bloomed beautifully. 

Last year I had a half a dozen mother plants that I figured I would put outside in the back yard, since it's legal now. 

They grew fantastically, big healthy plants. 

When the time came for them to bloom they just kept vegging except for there being a few buds that were on the far side from the light.

They just kept growing like that. October came and went. They died there like that. Sad.

It was obvious that the LED on the pole barn was giving them enough light to keep them from budding. 

Then it dawned on me that the hydrangea had the same problem. It had started not blooming the year I switched from a mercury light to the brighter LED.

I moved the hydrangea to the other side of the pool so the deck shaded it from the LED night light and it has beautiful blooms again this year.

So this is one of those times that actual experience matters. Not guessing on this.

The moon has a miniscule amount of light compared to a large outdoor LED light. This LED lights up over an acre. Really nice light if you take your dogs out at night. Terrible thing for flowers though. 

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Flood lights would definitely create a problem but small yard lights as referred to by the original poster shouldn't be a problem.

My main point in this thread is not to over think things and not obsess over small problems. There is going to be a learning curve like anything else but from the pictures the plant is doing great. 

I've had outdoor grows that didn't start to flower until September and turned out just fine.

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5 minutes ago, Wild Bill said:

Flood lights would definitely create a problem but small yard lights as referred to by the original poster shouldn't be a problem.

My main point in this thread is not to over think things and not obsess over small problems. There is going to be a learning curve like anything else but from the pictures the plant is doing great. 

I've had outdoor grows that didn't start to flower until September and turned out just fine.

The genetics he has also points to a late flowering cannabis strain. The best strains are like that. The weaker ones bud earlier.  The plants I have outdoors that share some of the genetics with his plant are just starting to bud. 

This has been the best year for growing outdoors I can remember as long as you have a water source because we are in a second drought right now.

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