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CORNBREAD MAFIA | JIM HIGDON [cannabis prohibition history]


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Montel talks with Kentiuky native Jim Higdon on this episode of Let’s Be Blunt. Jim wrote the first non-fiction account of the Cornbread Mafia which tells the story of the biggest domestic marijuana syndicate in American history, which took place in his hometown of Marion County, Kentucky. With the books success, he became a nationally recognized cannabis journalist, covering Kentucky for the Washington Post and cannabis policy for POLITICO. In 2018, he left journalism to co-found Cornbread Hemp.

 

 

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