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Felons getting right to be caregiver


rambozo420
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Mr.Komorn when the medical law was first passed I was able to be caregiver for my Mom. Then the legislature had a 3/4 vote that changed the voter initiative. I'm asking is there a leg to stand on in getting that reversed? I'm able to help many due to the recreational law being passed but I'm a bad guy if I get compensated. Whole new job opportunities opening up in the state in the canabis industry but I'm not eligible for these either. I'd be self sufficient and tax abiding given the opportunity to serve 5 patients not to mention the added plant count would give the opportunity to give away that much more. Would this be a cause Your interested in fighting if so I have some Capital to Donate. I'm sure I'm not alone. For those who will hate on this my apologies.

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  • 2 months later...

So it was a voter initiative and passed with 63 64 % of the vote. We the people is what our country with the constitution are governed by RIGHT? How did they change it? So once again I'll state class action Lawsuit is needed I'll gladly donate my portion of any winnings to the Lawyer/Champion of the people. Question if they are actively pardoning past weed convictions how can they press any New Ones LOL

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  • 2 months later...

well I guess changes in the mix WE THE PEOPLE cant compete with big money ive been living with the loss for years but some of You get to feel its sting too soon I feel sorry for our greedy monopoly country 

https://www.mlive.com/public-interest/2021/09/grow-limits-for-marijuana-caregivers-would-be-reduced-under-michigan-legislation.html

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Grow limits for marijuana caregivers would be reduced under Michigan legislation

Updated: Sep. 14, 2021, 8:20 p.m. | Published: Sep. 14, 2021, 8:18 p.m.
In-person Hash Bash event goes on in spite of COVID restrictions

MLive file photo from April 3, 2021. Jacob Hamilton | The Ann Arbor News

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The first shots were fired Tuesday in a long-brewing policy war surrounding the Michigan marijuana industry.

 

Some Michigan marijuana companies and politicians hope to drastically limit the amount of marijuana that loosely regulated medical cannabis caregivers may legally grow.

 

A package of bipartisan bills unveiled Tuesday, Sept. 14, would reduce the number of patients allowed per caregiver from five to one, beginning March 21, 2022.

 

With a 12-plant-per-patient limit, this would scale down the maximum amount a caregiver could grow at one time from 60 to 12 plants, with an additional 12 for personal use; and the current harvested marijuana limits they could keep on hand would dip from 15 ounces to five.

 
 

The proposed laws were introduced a day before supporters of marijuana caregivers plan to march at the Capitol in Lansing. For months, caregivers have been expecting this battle with large cannabis businesses that argue caregivers are responsible for the state’s enormous black market.

 
 

Marijuana pioneers argue legitimate caregivers aren’t to blame, but rather operators using the moniker to cover questionable activity.

 
 

The proposed legislation includes House bills 5300, H.B. 5301 and H.B. 5302.

 
 

One of the biggest proponents for curtailing the current caregiver system is the Michigan Cannabis Manufacturers Association, which represents some of the industry’s largest financial interests. They released a study in June that estimated nearly 2/3 of all marijuana sales in the state, nearly $3.2 billion worth, occurred outside of the licensed market.

 
AEG Michigan marijuana industry sales 2020 with caregiver and illicit

Chart from Anderson Economic Group that shows analysis of Michigan marijuana sales in 2020, including the portions that are sold outside the licensed market.

 
 

Supporters of greater caregiver restrictions also argue they shouldn’t be able to sell untested product.

 
 

The proposed legislation also creates a new license type, a “specialty medical grower,” that would operate in line with the licensed market. Specialty medical growers would be required to pay $500 applications fees and have their marijuana undergo safety compliance testing.

 

“Michigan’s unregulated cannabis market poses an immediate threat to the health of all Michiganders, and the Michigan Cannabis Safety Act updates outdated laws to help ensure all Michiganders have access to tested, tracked and labeled cannabis products,” Michigan Cannabis Manufacturers Association Board Chair Shelly Edgerton said. “We look forward to working with lawmakers on both sides of the aisle to bring Michigan’s unregulated, unlicensed cannabis market in line with the rest of the cannabis industry to help ensure safe, high-quality cannabis is available for all Michiganders.”

 
 

Edgerton, between 2016 and 2019, previously worked as the director of Michigan Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs, which oversees the state Marijuana Regulatory Agency.

 
 

During Edgerton’s tenure, the state Marijuana Regulatory Agency had in place exceptions that encouraged caregivers to sell their excess marijuana and other products to the burgeoning and undersupplied licensed market as it was ramping up. Caregivers were completely phased out of the licensed market by September 2020.

 
 

Because the caregiver classification was created by a 2008, voter-passed ballot initiative, changes to the current system would require a 75% super-majority vote.

 

“We have a huge supply of cannabis that’s not in the licensed marketplace,” Michigan Cannabis Manufacturers Association Director Steve Linder told MLive when rumors of forthcoming proposals to change to the caregiver system emerged in July. “And it’s not tested. We don’t know where it’s grown, we don’t know who’s growing it. People are not employing, they’re not investing in infrastructure, they’re not paying taxes. So, we have to get at the unregulated supply and that law needs to be passed. And we’re going to lead the charge.”

 
 

Caregiver supporters argue the black market issues are not due to law-abiding caregivers,.

 
 

“There is no good reason to create any further restriction or burdens on the current caregiver system,” said Jamie Lowell, a legalization pioneer and the director of social responsibility and advocacy at the Botanical Company, a marijuana retailer based in Lansing. “There is no health or other issues warranting any prohibitive changes to caregivers.

 

“ ... None of these amendments were a result of a reasonable process that sought input from important stakeholders. It seems as if it is common knowledge in Lansing that Steve Linder and the (Michigan Cannabis Manufacturers Association) are behind this.

 
 

“If so, it would make sense and be consistent with their known intention to hurt the caregiver system. I believe, out of the ignorant assumption that it will benefit them.”

 
 

Linder previously worked as a Republican lobbyist in Lansing before being named director of the Michigan Cannabis Manufacturers Association.

 
 

“There should be no changes to the current caregiver plant allowance, regardless of the addition of the specialty grower license type,” said Rick Thompson, a caregiver supporter and director of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML) Michigan chapter.

 
 

Thompson called the proposed legislation a “smoke-and-mirrors game” with the intent of reducing the number of caregivers while hiding behind claims of improved consumer safety.

 
 

More on MLive:

 
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7 hours ago, rambozo420 said:

well I guess changes in the mix WE THE PEOPLE cant compete with big money ive been living with the loss for years but some of You get to feel its sting too soon I feel sorry for our greedy monopoly country 

https://www.mlive.com/public-interest/2021/09/grow-limits-for-marijuana-caregivers-would-be-reduced-under-michigan-legislation.html

One thing you need to factor in here are all those caregiver grows set up to grow the max plants and then dump it all on the market. It's a 'thing'. I know a guy that works at a dispensary that does it. 72 huge plants. All maxed out. Going around all the regulations. Cutting the commercial line. It's not just a greedy monopoly country, it's a greedy people country. Hogs ruin it for everyone. 

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The guy who works at the dispensary explained how big this is. It's like a pyramid. He pays a guy $10,000 for a fenced in area to grow in with all the hook ups for his 72 plants. The guy who rents him the grow area has a whole bunch of clients paying him $10,000. 

Can you imagine the volume that has to be sold 'around the rules' to cover all that overhead? Tons!

It's an incredible greedy and stupid idea. 

This was supposed to be one caregiver selling to just 5 patients. 

Instead it turns into growers coercing patients by offering free weed for their grow rights.

 

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"One of the biggest proponents for curtailing the current caregiver system is the Michigan Cannabis Manufacturers Association"

The same people that said caregivers were dangerous because they sold untested cannabis. If they succeed with this the next step will be to get rid of grow rights altogether.

You can see that train coming from a long way off.

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4 minutes ago, Wild Bill said:

"One of the biggest proponents for curtailing the current caregiver system is the Michigan Cannabis Manufacturers Association"

The same people that said caregivers were dangerous because they sold untested cannabis. If they succeed with this the next step will be to get rid of grow rights altogether.

You can see that train coming from a long way off.

Everyone will still be able to grow 12 plants with no limit to what they can get off them. No limit. That's legal for everyone. No forms required. You don't have to play games or lie. Just grow those 12 into trees and enjoy more than you even need. 

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10 minutes ago, Restorium2 said:

Everyone will still be able to grow 12 plants with no limit to what they can get off them. No limit. That's legal for everyone. No forms required. You don't have to play games or lie. Just grow those 12 into trees and enjoy more than you even need. 

Unless they try to change the law again. But they wouldn't do that just to line their own pockets at our expense, would they?

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If they think this would help curb the black market, they have no clue! If this passes, more people than ever will be looking for ways around dispensary prices. Illegal growers will be more than happy to step in and supply the damand.  Prices will go up to 3000lb+ on black market. Even with people allowed to grow for rec personal use, there are many people just not willing to grow their own.

However, this divides the pie amongst less players. This is the reason they really want it passed. The big business dispensarys get a bigger market share. They don't give a crap about safety or the black market!

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Michigan Legislature Introduces Bills to Reduce Caregiver Program

https://hightimes.com/news/michigan-legislature-introduces-bills-to-reduce-caregiver-program/

Michigan lawmakers proposed three bills yesterday that aim to reduce what caregivers can provide for medical cannabis patients.

The Michigan legislature returned full-time on September 9, and House Bills 5300, 5301 and 5302 were introduced on September 14. This bill package seeks to alter the Medical Marihuana Act, which was initially implemented in 2008. If passed, the bills would reduce caregiver patients from five to only one, and reduce the number of plants a caregiver can grow from 60 to 12, with an additional 12 plants they’re allowed to grow for personal use. One of the bills also creates a license called “specialty medical grower,” which would require a $500 application to get cannabis tested.

According to Mlive.com, these bills were proposed one day before a protest was set to occur. Yesterday, the “Michigan Caregivers United: Rally at the Capitol” protest was held in front of the state capitol in Lansing. The march was held to protest the Michigan Cannabis Manufacturer’s Association (MCMA) and its push to limit caregiver’s allowances for their patients. 

“Michigan’s cannabis consumers have lashed out in anger; a boycott of MCMA products and companies affiliated with them has resulted in the resignation of their president, the removal of any reference to individual members on their website, the election of a new board chair to clean up their public relations and the cancellation of orders from MCMA companies by retailers.” The protest has been in the works for some time, with an official press release announcement posted on July 8 in anticipation of these plans.

The MCMA released a study in June through the Anderson Economic Group stating that 70 percent of cannabis sales were made outside of regulated dispensaries, and that illegal sales are the main way that residents are obtaining cannabis. 

“Michigan’s unregulated cannabis market poses an immediate threat to the health of all Michiganders, and the Michigan Cannabis Safety Act updates outdated laws to help ensure all Michiganders have access to tested, tracked and labeled cannabis products,” MCMA Board Chair Shelly Edgerton told Mlive.com

 

“We look forward to working with lawmakers on both sides of the aisle to bring Michigan’s unregulated, unlicensed cannabis market in line with the rest of the cannabis industry to help ensure safe, high-quality cannabis is available for all Michiganders.”

The MCMA’s website states that the organization represents “nearly half of all multiple Class C cannabis licenses in Michigan,” which is the most expensive license type, and represents the largest cultivation businesses in the state.

Those who oppose this notion argue that caregivers are not responsible for black market sales, and that there’s no good reason to threaten the caregiver system. Over 250 companies have spoken out in favor of supporting the caregiver program as well as small businesses. Companies such as The Botanical Co. released official statements regarding the MCMA. 

“We stand with our fellow industry professionals in their efforts to stop the attack on caregivers. It is our belief that our industry thrives when small businesses and caregivers can flourish,” officials said in a statement. “Our customers and patients remain at the core of what we do and to ensure they continue to have access to the products they rely on, we are actively pursuing the sourcing of high quality products from companies that more align with our mission. We encourage local brands to contact us if they are interested in retail space at our stores. Together, we can make a difference and move our industry forward.”

According to the Marijuana Regulatory Agency in a July report, there are 30,229 caregivers in the state and 251,284 medical cannabis patients that they serve. A majority of these patients suffer from conditions such as chronic pain, arthritis, muscle spasms and PTSD. Meanwhile, the state is taking many steps toward improving social equity and supporting residents’ rights to consume while off the job.

 

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The MCMA released a study in June through the Anderson Economic Group stating that 70 percent of cannabis sales were made outside of regulated dispensaries, and that illegal sales are the main way that residents are obtaining cannabis. 

The study is correct as far as what it says here. Where they got it wrong is blaming caregivers and the caregiver system. They see caregivers as the problem because they are the nail they can find to hammer. The market they can't see is where their competition is. Law enforcement is not looking for the illegal grows like they used to. When this all turned into a legal business the avenue to punish your cheating competition is the CIVIL courts now. The courts are all tied up because of Covid. Even if they could use the court system it's way to tedious and expensive to attack cheating growers and sellers one by one. They had a serious lack of insight when they invested heavily in the legal cannabis business. This was all going to happen. I'm just surprised it took so long. Weed will be free one way or another. The dams bust one by one until we end up where we should have been all along. That's how the universe works. Everything is equalized eventually. Glad I'm alive to see it. 

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To explain my 'universe' comment:

When you base something all on lies it is unsustainable. The universe decides how to put things back where they belong when they are unsustainable. So 'medical' was not ever the answer. 'Quasi Legalization' with bribes is also not the answer. Unfettered access to the plant will be where this all ends up. Stand in the way and you will be steamrolled. 

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The problem they're having is that they base their suppositions on the alcohol model. By making it illegal to distill your own liquor people are forced to buy their liquor from licensed distilleries. A great deal of knowledge and specialized equipment is needed to do your own distillation in any kind of quantity that would challenge the supremacy of the corporations.

Cannabis presents them with the problem that anyone with a seed and a patch of ground can grow it. They won't be forced to purchase from the big boys because it grows anywhere.

Where do these buffoons think the cannabis came from before they  were in business?

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