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Reform Federal Marijuana Laws


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The most dangerous side effects of cannabis are being caught by authorities, going to prison, beaten, killed, mugged, raped or ripped off. All of which are directly attributed to the criminalization of cannabis.

 

We can see over 100,000 patients in Michigan have used a system that is safer, cheaper, and a system that is more consistent and more reliable than patients getting their medicine off the street. As an example for the federal change, this can prove that citizens can overcome a handicapped system. We can overcome a barbarian system created by lies under oath, and system lacking present day scientific facts.

 

If cannabis where rescheduled to a lesser evil, it could be easily prescribed, monitored, and taxed. Instead of wasting billions of our tax dollars on monitoring, enforcing, and incarcerating our own citizens, over 50 billion dollars of tax revenue would be injected back into our system for infrastructure, education, and controls, instead of going into the pockets of organized crime and ordinary peddlers. Every 30 seconds someone is arrested for a simple cannabis possession, that’s over $400 a second for legal fees.

 

People who use cannabis medicinally should not be subjected to the same stigma as recreational users, and should not have to defend their choice of medicine. Just reforming cannabis laws by rescheduling the drug from Schedule I to Schedule II would allow heavily trained doctors and medical professionals the ability to prescribe, administer, monitor, control, cultivate and distribute a non-lethal, non-toxic, non-addictive, and a medicinally beneficial substance to patients who would benefit from the active ingredients in cannabis.

 

The United States Constitution and our very own Bill of Rights are written on and founded upon the cultivation of cannabis. Washington, Jefferson, Lincoln, and Obama all once said they have enjoyed relaxing with the help of cannabis’s therapeutic properties. In fact cannabis is a cash crop, and is legally tolerated and harvested in many other countries around the world.

 

Cannabis relieves the symptoms of common diseases, such as Cachexia or Wasting Syndrome, Severe and Chronic Pain, Severe Nausea, Seizures, Epilepsy, Severe and Persistent Muscle Spasms, Multiple Sclerosis, Cancer, Glaucoma, HIV or AIDS Positive, Hepatitis C, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Crohn’s Disease, Agitation of Alzheimer’s Disease, and Nail Patella. Even the Queen of England was once prescribed medical cannabis to relieve her symptoms of menstrual cramps.

 

Would you rather have your kids, kids friends or pets discover a medicine chest filled with a bunch of manufactured pharmaceutical poisons, or would you rather they accidently discover a harmless and non-lethal substance. Compared to the millions of tobacco, alcohol and firearm deaths, there has been only one incident of death directly related to cannabis, which is heavily subjected to professional scrutiny and accuracy.

 

So what are you waiting for?

Vote for Ron Paul 2012 if you want change!

www.ronpaul2012.com

 

Ron Paul supports ending the failed drug war; and he also supports treating addiction as a disease rather that of a crime. I personally believe Dr. Ron Paul cares about our global society, our welfare, and our health.

 

 

 

Side effects of Prescription Drugs

Vicodin ES Side Effects

The most frequently reported adverse reactions include: lightheadedness, dizziness, sedation, nausea and vomiting. These effects seem to be more prominent in ambulatory than in nonambulatory patients and some of these adverse reactions may be alleviated if the patient lies down.

Other adverse reactions include:

Central Nervous System

Drowsiness, mental clouding, lethargy, impairment of mental and physical performance, anxiety, fear, dysphoria, psychic dependence, mood changes.

Gastrointestinal System

Prolonged administration of Vicodin ES Tablets may produce constipation.

Genitourinary System

Ureteral spasm, spasm of vesical sphincters and urinary retention have been reported with opiates.

Respiratory Depression

Hydrocodone bitartrate may produce dose-related respiratory depression by acting directly on the brain stem respiratory center..

Special Senses

Cases of hearing impairment or permanent loss have been reported predominantly in patients with chronic overdose.

Dermatological

Skin rash, pruritus.

The following adverse drug events may be borne in mind as potential effects of acetaminophen: allergic reactions, rash, thrombocytopenia, agranulocytosis, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis.

Potential effects of high dosage are listed in the OVERDOSAGE section.

 

Norco Side Effects - for the Professional

Norco

The most frequently reported adverse reactions are lightheadedness, dizziness, sedation, nausea and vomiting. These effects seem to be more prominent in ambulatory than in nonambulatory patients, and some of these adverse reactions may be alleviated if the patient lies down.

Other adverse reactions include:

Central Nervous System: Drowsiness, mental clouding, lethargy, impairment of mental and physical performance, anxiety, fear, dysphoria, psychic dependence, mood changes.

Gastrointestinal System: Prolonged administration of Norco® may produce constipation.

Genitourinary System: Ureteral spasm, spasm of vesical sphincters and urinary retention have been reported with opiates.

Respiratory Depression: Hydrocodone bitartrate may produce dose-related respiratory depression by acting directly on the brain stem respiratory centers.

Special Senses: Cases of hearing impairment or permanent loss have been reported predominantly in patients with chronic overdose.

Dermatological: Skin rash, pruritus.

Side Effects by Body System - for Healthcare Professionals

General

The adverse effects of hydrocodone are generally similar to the adverse effects observed with other narcotic analgesics. Acetaminophen is generally well-tolerated when administered in therapeutic doses.

Nervous system

One study has suggested that the respiratory depression caused by hydrocodone may be of benefit in the treatment of dyspnea related to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and restrictive lung disease. However, the potential for the precipitation of respiratory insufficiency makes such use of hydrocodone hazardous and such use should be undertaken, if at all, only with extreme caution.

Nervous system side effects of hydrocodone include mental depression, dizziness, lightheadedness, respiratory depression (which is sometimes fatal), stupor, delirium, somnolence, agitation, and dysphoria.

Other

Other side effects have included withdrawal symptoms, after either abrupt cessation or fast tapering of narcotic analgesics. Such symptoms may include agitation, restlessness, anxiety, insomnia, tremor, abdominal cramps, blurred vision, vomiting, and sweating.

Hepatic

Alcoholic patients may develop hepatotoxicity after even modest doses of acetaminophen. In healthy patients, approximately 15 grams of acetaminophen is necessary to deplete liver glutathione stores by 70% in a 70 kg person. However, hepatotoxicity has been reported following smaller doses. Glutathione concentrations may be repleted by the antidote N-acetylcysteine. One case report has suggested that hypothermia may also be beneficial in decreasing liver damage during overdose.

 

In a recent retrospective study of 306 patients admitted for acetaminophen overdose, 6.9% had severe liver injury but all recovered. None of the 306 patients died.

 

A 19-year-old female developed hepatotoxicity, reactive plasmacytosis and agranulocytosis followed by a leukemoid reaction after acute acetaminophen toxicity.

 

The adverse effects of hydrocodone may be more likely and more severe in patients with liver disease.

Hepatic side effects including severe and sometimes fatal dose dependent hepatitis have been reported in alcoholic patients. Hepatotoxicity has been increased during fasting. Several cases of hepatotoxicity from chronic acetaminophen therapy at therapeutic doses have also been reported despite a lack of risk factors for toxicity.

Gastrointestinal

Gastrointestinal side effects with the use of acetaminophen are rare except in alcoholics and after overdose. Cases of acute pancreatitis have been reported rarely.

 

Gastrointestinal side effect including nausea, vomiting, constipation, and dry mouth are relatively common effects of narcotic analgesics.

One study has suggested that acetaminophen may precipitate acute biliary pain and cholestasis. The mechanism of this effect may be related to inhibition of prostaglandin and alterations in the regulation of the sphincter of Oddi.

Genitourinary

Genitourinary side effects including ureteral spasm, spasm of vesicle sphincters, and urinary retention have been reported.

Dermatologic

Dermatologic side effects including narcotic-induced rashes have been reported. General erythematous skin rashes associated with acetaminophen have been reported, but are rare. A rare case of bullous erythema associated with acetaminophen has been reported.

Renal

Renal side effects of acetaminophen are rare and include acute tubular necrosis and interstitial nephritis. Adverse renal effects are most often observed after overdose, from chronic abuse (often with multiple analgesics), or in association with acetaminophen-related hepatotoxicity.

Acute tubular necrosis usually occurs in conjunction with liver failure, but has been observed as an isolated finding in rare cases.

 

The adverse effects of hydrocodone may be more likely and more severe in patients with renal insufficiency.

Hematologic

Hematologic side effects including rare cases of thrombocytopenia associated with acetaminophen have been reported. Acute thrombocytopenia has also been reported as having been caused by sensitivity to acetaminophen glucuronide, the major metabolite of acetaminophen. Methemoglobinemia with resulting cyanosis has also been observed in the setting of acute overdose.

Hypersensitivity

Hypersensitivity side effects to acetaminophen have been reported rarely.

Respiratory

Respiratory side effects have included a case of eosinophilic pneumonia which has been associated with acetaminophen.

Metabolic

In the case of metabolic acidosis, causality is uncertain as more than one drug was ingested. The case of metabolic acidosis followed the ingestion of 75 grams of acetaminophen, 1.95 grams of aspirin, and a small amount of a liquid household cleaner. The patient also had a history of seizures which the authors reported may have contributed to an increased lactate level indicative of metabolic acidosis.

Metabolic side effects including metabolic acidosis have been reported following a massive overdose of acetaminophen.

Edited by cantibliss
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