Jump to content

I Have A Dream...


Recommended Posts

I would love to see a national day for addressing the marijuana issue. One day would be set aside - like a Saturday - for everyone to discuss marijuana. The only caveat for the day would be a requirement that every one must smoke pot before joining in the discussion. People could gather at churches, town halls, community centers, etc. and commence passing the pipe at a certain specified time - say 4:20 or so - and then engage in a discussion. Afterwards, everyone could vote to decide if they favored marijuana decriminalization.

 

 

WOW! I think the national debate would change in a hurry. Unfortunately, this will never occur in an uptight, neurotic society such as we live in. It is a shame, really, because it is the only way in which we can have a rational discussion about this substance.

 

I am such a dreamer...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

an interesting dream, amish. I remember reading about some very uptight people who changed completely after trying it.

 

LOL Kirsten. Yup, lots of food.

 

Imagine a nation that took the time to relax and think. Well we can dream, dreaming is all some people have.

 

For now I am at least glad there are many people who believe in MM.

 

Sb

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Right. The original I Have A Dream concept is still very relevant. MLK's point was that the richest 3-5 percent of the country has a vested interest in keeping the rest of us at war with eachother. I can definately be a B sometimes but we all need to get it together and show them what we are made of.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would love to see a national day for addressing the marijuana issue. One day would be set aside - like a Saturday - for everyone to discuss marijuana. The only caveat for the day would be a requirement that every one must smoke pot before joining in the discussion. People could gather at churches, town halls, community centers, etc. and commence passing the pipe at a certain specified time - say 4:20 or so - and then engage in a discussion. Afterwards, everyone could vote to decide if they favored marijuana decriminalization.

 

 

WOW! I think the national debate would change in a hurry. Unfortunately, this will never occur in an uptight, neurotic society such as we live in. It is a shame, really, because it is the only way in which we can have a rational discussion about this substance.

 

I am such a dreamer...

 

http://www.safeaccessnow.org/article.php?id=6429

 

 

Folks we had a nationwide event a couple months back...but, everyday is medical cannabis awareness day here in Michigan.

 

For Immediate Release: May 2nd, 2011

Medical Marijuana Advocates Stage National Day of Action Against Federal Interference

 

Rallies in Sacramento & DC as advocates deliver federal "Cease & Desist" orders across the US

 

 

Washington, DC -- Patients and their supporters rallied at the Justice Department in Washington, DC today to protest increased federal interference in medical marijuana states. More than 200 supporters also rallied today in Sacramento for medical marijuana patients Dr. Mollie Fry and her husband Dale Schafer as they surrendered to federal authorities to serve out 5-year prison terms. On Thursday, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) raided several distribution centers in Spokane, Washington, as a state bill to license such facilities was vetoed the next day by Governor Gregoire. Thursday's actions are the latest in a string of more than 100 aggressive SWAT-style federal raids carried out since President Obama took office.

 

"Patients are sick and tired of being singled out, stigmatized and harassed over the medication they choose," said Steph Sherer, Executive Director of Americans for Safe Access (ASA), the medical marijuana patients' rights group organizing the protest. "At minimum, the federal government must end its intimidation tactics of threats and harmful raids," continued Sherer. "But more importantly, medical marijuana is an urgent public health issue that President Obama should address by working with -- not against -- the patient community."

 

As part of its "Sick and Tired" campaign, ASA also organized the delivery of "Cease & Desist" orders to federal officials today in 10 medical marijuana states, including Arizona (Phoenix, Tucson), California (Los Angeles, San Diego, San Francisco), Colorado (Denver), Maine (Portland), Michigan (Detroit, Lansing), Montana (Billings), Nevada (Las Vegas), Oregon (Eugene, Portland), Rhode Island (Providence), and Washington (Everett, Seattle, Spokane).

 

The national day of action comes at a time of heightened federal attacks on medical marijuana states, routinely timed to coincide with state legislative actions. Threats of criminal prosecution have been made by U.S. Attorneys against local and state officials in California, Colorado, Hawaii, Montana, Rhode Island and Washington. In March, more than two-dozen federal raids in Montana were timed to coincide with deliberation on a pending bill to repeal that state's medical marijuana law. After Governor Schweitzer later vetoed the bill, US Attorney Michael Cotter issued a threatening letter to the state's legislative leadership, further discouraging them from adopting a cultivation and distribution licensing law.

 

"The imprisonment of Dr. Mollie Fry and Dale Schafer is emblematic of a failed federal policy," said Sherer. Fry and Schafer were raided by the DEA in 2001, despite approval from local law enforcement to cultivate medical marijuana. Fry and Schafer were later charged and tried in 2007 for manufacturing, and conspiracy to manufacture and distribute marijuana. They were denied a medical defense despite their adherence to state law and ultimately convicted. In order to obtain the mandatory minimum 5-year sentence, the government was able to add up multiple years of harvests to arrive at more than 100 plants. The Obama administration vigorously fought an appeal of their sentence in the Ninth Circuit.

 

Adding to the cost of incarceration, both Fry and Schafer are in need of medical attention. Fry, a breast cancer survivor, and Schafer, a hemophiliac, will also be leaving behind a family of 5 children and 2 grandchildren, and will miss the birth of another grandchild in October. Advocates are calling on President Obama to grant clemency and commute Fry and Schafer's sentence. In April, ASA issued a report card, giving Obama a failing grade on medical marijuana. "President Obama has given us nothing but broken promises and half-measures, and patients deserve better," said ASA spokesperson Kris Hermes.

 

Further information:

ASA's "Sick and Tired" campaign page: http://AmericansForSafeAccess.org/article.php?id=6369

ASA's "Cease & Desist" order: http://AmericansForSafeAccess.org/downloads/ASA_Cease_Desist.pdf

Threatening letters from US Attorneys: http://AmericansForSafeAccess.org/downloads/DOJ_Threat_Letters.pdf

Obama Report Card: http://AmericansForSafeAccess.org/downloads/Obama_Report_Card.pdf

 

 

Medical Marijuana Advocates Stage National Day of Action Against Federal Interference

Rallies in Sacramento & DC as advocates deliver federal "Cease & Desist" orders across the US

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How can you have any type of educated rational discussion or debate about cannabis or anything else with those who won't listen?

 

The answer is simple. You can't. Positive change will happen only when citizens unite and make it happen.

 

 

John Kay's lyrics are more true today than ever before:

 

America, where are you now?

Don't you care about your sons and daughters?

Don't you know, we need you now.

We can't fight alone against the monster.

 

Monster is exactly what they are as proven by their savage onslaught against We the People. You can't talk common sense to a monster.

 

 

 

Peace in the Cannabis Community :rock:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Right. The original I Have A Dream concept is still very relevant. MLK's point was that the richest 3-5 percent of the country has a vested interest in keeping the rest of us at war with eachother. I can definately be a B sometimes but we all need to get it together and show them what we are made of.

 

So very true. The "divide and conquer" strategy has been a very workable tactic for a very long time. It is amazing to me that people still fall for it.

 

"Those who don't understand history are doomed to repeat it."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nixon Tapes Reveal Twisted Roots Of Marijuana Prohibition

White House Conversations Reveal Prejudices, Culture War Behind Nixon's Drug War

The Former Governor Delivered An Honest, Thorough Report. The President Wanted Something Different.

Washington, DC: "We need, and I use the word 'all out war,' or all fronts . . . ." That was Richard Nixon's reaction to his national commission's recommendation that marijuana no longer be a criminal offense, according to Nixon's Oval Office tapes. The year after Nixon's "all out war" marijuana arrests jumped by over 100,000 people.

(Download a PDF copy of the CSDP Research Report, "Nixon Tapes Show Roots of Marijuana Prohibition: Misinformation, Culture Wars and Prejudice," as well as text transcripts of portions of Nixon White House taped conversations, including the portions excerpted in the report. Also, check out this column written by humorist Gene Weingarten of the Washington Post on March 21, 2002, based on CSDP's research work, "Just What Was He Smoking?" Read this op-ed by CSDP President Kevin B. Zeese, "Once-Secret 'Nixon Tapes' Show Why The US Outlawed Pot." Finally, review the Shafer Commission's report, "Marihuana, A Signal of Misunderstanding," by clicking here.)

The Nixon White House tapes from 1971-1972 demonstrate that the foundation of the modern war on marijuana was Nixonian prejudice, culture war and misinformation. CSDP's Doug McVay spent several days at the National Archives listening to the Nixon White House tapes to find conversations about drug policy, especially regarding the National Commission on Marihuana and Drug Abuse ("the Shafer Commission"), appointed by President Nixon. He found: Nixon blaming calls for marijuana legalization on Jews; Nixon blaming the decline and fall of ancient Rome, and of the Catholic Church, on homosexuality; and Nixon criticizing the CBS sitcom "All in the Family" as a show which promoted homosexuality. (Check out some of these transcripts.)

More importantly, Nixon made clear several times that he wanted a report which supported his views and 'tough on crime' policies, no matter what the facts might be. To his credit, Governor Shafer delivered instead an honest report, with conclusions based on all the evidence -- even though at the time he was being considered for a federal judgeship (needless to say, he didn't get it).

 

"At a critical juncture when the United States decided how it would handle marijuana, President Nixon's prejudices did more to dominate policy that the thoughtful and extensive review of his own Blue Ribbon Commission," observed Kevin Zeese, President of Common Sense for Drug Policy. "If we had followed the advice of the experts rather than Nixon's prejudices we would have less marijuana use, be spending less money on marijuana enforcement and many million less people would have been arrested." Since the Commission issued its recommendation that marijuana offenses not be a crime, fifteen million people have been arrested on marijuana charges.

Highlights of Nixon comments on marijuana:

  • Jews and marijuana: "I see another thing in the news summary this morning about it. That's a funny thing, every one of the gentlemen that are out for legalizing marijuana is Jewish. What the Christ is the matter with the Jews, Bob, what is the matter with them? I suppose it's because most of them are psychiatrists . . ." Marijuana and the culture wars: "You see, homosexuality, dope, immorality in general. These are the enemies of strong societies. That's why the Communists and the left-wingers are pushing the stuff, they're trying to destroy us."Marijuana compared to alcohol: marijuana consumers smoke "to get high" while "a person drinks to have fun." Nixon also saw marijuana leading to loss of motivation and discipline but claimed: "At least with liquor I don't lose motivation." Marijuana and political dissent: ". . . radical demonstrators that were here . . . two weeks ago . . . They're all on drugs, virtually all."
  • Drug education: "Enforce the law, you’ve got to scare them."

The Links: Download a PDF copy of the CSDP Research Report,

"Nixon Tapes Show Roots of Marijuana Prohibition: Misinformation, Culture Wars and Prejudice," here. Also, click here to download text transcripts of portions of Nixon White House taped conversations, including the portions excerpted in the report. Check out this column written by humorist Gene Weingarten of the Washington Post on March 21, 2002, based on CSDP's research work, "Just What Was He Smoking?" Read this op-ed by CSDP President Kevin B. Zeese, "Once-Secret 'Nixon Tapes' Show Why The US Outlawed Pot." Finally, review the Shafer Commission's report, "Marihuana, A Signal of Misunderstanding," by clicking here.

dwf_logo03.jpgadcamp_logo03.jpgactive02.jpgabout03.jpgaddict_logo03.jpgedcs_logo03.jpgdwdist.jpgreading01.jpgcopyright © 2002-2003, Common Sense for Drug Policy, Kevin B. Zeese, President -- Mike Gray, Chairman -- Robert E. Field, Co-Chairman & Executive Director -- Melvin R. Allen, Director -- Doug McVay, Editor & Webmaster tel 717-299-0600 - fax 717-393-4953 - info@csdp.org Updated: Thursday, July 09, 2009 ~ Accessed: 67731

Edited by DreamWarrior67
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share



×
×
  • Create New...