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Outdoor Vs Indoor


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Has anyone grown the same strain outdoors and indoors? Are the effects similar, or is the one outdoors more stimulating? Reason I ask is because of this:

 

(5) "Pate (1983) indicated that in areas of high ultraviolet radiation exposure, the UVB (280-320 nm) absorption properties of THC may have conferred an evolutionary advantage to Cannabis capable of greater production of this compound from biogenetic precursor CBD. The extent to which this production is also influenced by environmental UVB has also been experimentally determined by Lydon et al. (1987)."

http://www.weedfarmer.com/cannabis/thc_guide.php

 

This suggests that UV exposure will turn some precious CBD into THC. Perhaps for those with chronic pain it would be advantageous to avoid use of UV lights and grow indoors?

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Has anyone grown the same strain outdoors and indoors? Are the effects similar, or is the one outdoors more stimulating? Reason I ask is because of this:

 

 

http://www.weedfarmer.com/cannabis/thc_guide.php

 

This suggests that UV exposure will turn some precious CBD into THC. Perhaps for those with chronic pain it would be advantageous to avoid use of UV lights and grow indoors?

 

you are on to something here.

 

Indoor HID lights lack the full range of light as sunlight, for example they do not have UV a/b in the spectrum.

My reading about sunlight vs HID is that sunlight causes the plant to want to protect itself from harmful UV rays, so it makes more trichromes. As far as the plant being more potent - we have to agree that potency is genetic and really what you are doing is achieving the full potential of that plant - not more.

 

I would agree - sooner or later, indoor growers should try some strains outdoors to see how sunlight could bring a plant to its full potential with a full spectrum light. You also consider sunlight is about 250,000 lumens (it is more impressive when you consider the sun is about 30 million miles away)

 

Lastly, I do not think you convert CBD/Ns to THC, THC degrades to CBD/N. The sunlight just causes more trichromes, thus more medicine is present on the plant.

 

DN

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Outdoor isn't even considered medical... Why do you think we see a bunch of outdoor cali crap here?

 

I guarantee go buy a 500$ oz of the best stuff you ever had from California and it came from a indoor grow-op

 

You can't control outdoor like you can indoor.

 

I have seen both indoor and outdoor turn out to be crap, I have also see indoor and outdoor compete for the tippy top of the shelf.... It all comes down to the main factors, the growers and the conditions and the genetics....

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grow out doors is the best, but you have to have the right sun, and temps to do this,michigan is not the best for this Northern Cal is one of the best places to get good out door stuff

 

lol come on now.....its called strain dependent....I know most people have to base thier opinions on hightimes.....ive got fam in hayfork and trinity northern cali...no cali does not grow better outdoor meds than michigan. they may have the ability to grow and finish more strains there than here....but no cali weed isnt better. ive had it . they tried their damnest to get me to trade....

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Outdoor isn't even considered medical... Why do you think we see a bunch of outdoor cali crap here?

 

I guarantee go buy a 500$ oz of the best stuff you ever had from California and it came from a indoor grow-op

 

You can't control outdoor like you can indoor.

Now thats some silly bunny muffin to say....you sould like one of those pharmacutical guys swearing up n down its not meds cause its a plant. your out of your mind if you think meds cant be grown under the sun, we never would have discovered the medical values of this plant if it were not for the sun

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CBD is converted into THC by UV light - CBN is what THC degrades into... let me see if I can find a reference...

 

01. "In the laboratory, Mechoulam has converted CBD acid to THC acids by exposing a solution of CBD acid in n-hexane to ultraviolet light of 235-285 nm, for up to 48 hours. This reaction uses atmospheric oxygen molecules (02) and is irreversible; however, the yield of the conversion is only about 15% THC acid ... ETC."

http://www.thcfarmer.com/forums/f32/diy-dwc-buckets-cooler-26111/index3.html

 

THC is thought to be produced by the plant (Fig. 2, next page) from cannabidiol (CBD) which, in turn, is derived from cannabigerol (CBG) generated from non-cannabinoid precursors

http://www.hempfood.com/Iha/iha01201.html

 

This is what's got me wondering... I used a UVB lamp for my last grow, my current one it's been off the whole time.. I'm really wondering if UV exposure lowers the amount of painkilling CBD present in the final product.

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The potheads may be the only survivors.

 

Explains all the recent crap ..

 

Anyone had diarrhea lately?

Anyone live down wind of Japan?

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radiation_poisoning

 

Fema camps, military in the US, government making lists of people hording food.

 

In this case, indoor cannabis may be the best.

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CBD is converted into THC by UV light - CBN is what THC degrades into... let me see if I can find a reference...

 

 

http://www.thcfarmer.com/forums/f32/diy-dwc-buckets-cooler-26111/index3.html

 

 

http://www.hempfood.com/Iha/iha01201.html

 

This is what's got me wondering... I used a UVB lamp for my last grow, my current one it's been off the whole time.. I'm really wondering if UV exposure lowers the amount of painkilling CBD present in the final product.

 

You are correct that THC degrades to CBN, not CBD. Also, there is no evidence to support that CBD breaks down to CBN likes THC does.

 

The 1994 "Chemical ecology of Cannabis" paper that you cited is out of date regarding the biosynthetic pathways of the cannabinoids. While it used to be proposed that CBD was a precursor for THC, newer evidence has shown that CBD, THC, and CBC, all share the same precursor, CBG.

 

http://www.gwpharm.com/cultivation.aspx

http://projectcbd.com/Availability.html

www.genetics.org/content/163/1/335.full.pdf (see Figure 1b)

 

The 1994 "Chemical ecology of Cannabis" paper does however have some interesting information regarding the evolutionary purposes & stability of the compounds to UV radiation:

 

Another stress to which plants are subject results from their daily exposure to sunlight. While necessary to sustain photosynthesis, natural light contains biologically destructive ultraviolet radiation. This selective pressure has apparently affected the evolution of certain defenses, among them, a chemical screening functionally analogous to the pigmentation of human skin. A preliminary investigation (Pate 1983) indicated that, in areas of high ultraviolet radiation exposure, the UV-B (280-315 nm) absorption properties of THC may have conferred an evolutionary advantage to Cannabis capable of greater production of this compound from biogenetic precursor CBD. The extent to which this production is also influenced by environmental UV-B induced stress has been experimentally determined by Lydon et al. (1987). Their experiments demonstrate that under conditions of high UV-B exposure, drug-type Cannabis produces significantly greater quantities of THC. They have also demonstrated the chemical lability of CBD upon exposure to UV-B (Lydon and Teramura 1987), in contrast to the stability of THC and CBC. However, studies by Brenneisen (1984) have shown only a minor difference in UV-B absorption between THC and CBD, and the absorptive properties of CBC proved considerably greater than either. Perhaps the relationship between the cannabinoids and UV-B is not so direct as first supposed. Two other explanations must now be considered. Even if CBD absorbs on par with THC, in areas of high ambient UV-B, the former compound may be more rapidly degraded. This could lower the availability of CBD present or render it the less energetically efficient compound to produce by the plant. Alternatively, the greater UV-B absorbency of CBC compared to THC and the relative stability of CBC compared to CBD might nominate this compound as the protective screening substance. The presence of large amounts of THC would then have to be explained as merely an accumulated storage compound at the end of the enzyme-mediated cannabinoid pathway.

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You are correct that THC degrades to CBN, not CBD. Also, there is no evidence to support that CBD breaks down to CBN likes THC does.

 

The 1994 "Chemical ecology of Cannabis" paper that you cited is out of date regarding the biosynthetic pathways of the cannabinoids. While it used to be proposed that CBD was a precursor for THC, newer evidence has shown that CBD, THC, and CBC, all share the same precursor, CBG.

 

http://www.gwpharm.com/cultivation.aspx

http://projectcbd.com/Availability.html

www.genetics.org/content/163/1/335.full.pdf (see Figure 1b)

 

The 1994 "Chemical ecology of Cannabis" paper does however have some interesting information regarding the evolutionary purposes & stability of the compounds to UV radiation:

 

Another stress to which plants are subject results from their daily exposure to sunlight. While necessary to sustain photosynthesis, natural light contains biologically destructive ultraviolet radiation. This selective pressure has apparently affected the evolution of certain defenses, among them, a chemical screening functionally analogous to the pigmentation of human skin. A preliminary investigation (Pate 1983) indicated that, in areas of high ultraviolet radiation exposure, the UV-B (280-315 nm) absorption properties of THC may have conferred an evolutionary advantage to Cannabis capable of greater production of this compound from biogenetic precursor CBD. The extent to which this production is also influenced by environmental UV-B induced stress has been experimentally determined by Lydon et al. (1987). Their experiments demonstrate that under conditions of high UV-B exposure, drug-type Cannabis produces significantly greater quantities of THC. They have also demonstrated the chemical lability of CBD upon exposure to UV-B (Lydon and Teramura 1987), in contrast to the stability of THC and CBC. However, studies by Brenneisen (1984) have shown only a minor difference in UV-B absorption between THC and CBD, and the absorptive properties of CBC proved considerably greater than either. Perhaps the relationship between the cannabinoids and UV-B is not so direct as first supposed. Two other explanations must now be considered. Even if CBD absorbs on par with THC, in areas of high ambient UV-B, the former compound may be more rapidly degraded. This could lower the availability of CBD present or render it the less energetically efficient compound to produce by the plant. Alternatively, the greater UV-B absorbency of CBC compared to THC and the relative stability of CBC compared to CBD might nominate this compound as the protective screening substance. The presence of large amounts of THC would then have to be explained as merely an accumulated storage compound at the end of the enzyme-mediated cannabinoid pathway.

 

It's odd that plants that I let run long didn't seem to have CBN in it. My oils were noticed to be much higher in CBD than most growers.

 

I read a report by the UN a while ago that stated that cannabinoid profiles can be shifted via nutrients. To much or two little Mg favored more CBD.

 

So I don't measure the CalMag .. Seems I found my CBD .. Anyway, this increase in CBD seems to arrive at the expense of the CBN. bummer .. So I need to tweak for CBN and see what I hit. Makes me wonder about the current understanding of the CBN pathway.

 

There goes another couple of years ..

 

Been hitting THCV and Delta-8 also ..

 

GW (I believe) didn't realize that peppermint oil has a cannabinoid in it. CB2 one at that .. Lets see .. double blind. Sativex has a touch of peppermint in it for "flavor." So they probably put it into the placebo to blind the administrator ..

 

They put a cannabinoid in the placebo ..

 

Some oils I've been cooking long and hard. All the turpenes gone. Nearly flat line in that area.

 

I think GW did the right thing by adding the peppermint. It calms the stomach .. everyone knows that :) I might need to add some also.

Edited by peanutbutter
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It's odd that plants that I let run long didn't seem to have CBN in it. My oils were noticed to be much higher in CBD than most growers.

 

I read a report by the UN a while ago that stated that cannabinoid profiles can be shifted via nutrients. To much or two little Mg favored more CBD.

 

So I don't measure the CalMag .. Seems I found my CBD .. Anyway, this increase in CBD seems to arrive at the expense of the CBN. bummer .. So I need to tweak for CBN and see what I hit. Makes me wonder about the current understanding of the CBN pathway.

 

There goes another couple of years ..

 

Been hitting THCV and Delta-8 also ..

 

GW (I believe) didn't realize that peppermint oil has a cannabinoid in it. CB2 one at that .. Lets see .. double blind. Sativex has a touch of peppermint in it for "flavor." So they probably put it into the placebo to blind the administrator ..

 

They put a cannabinoid in the placebo ..

 

Some oils I've been cooking long and hard. All the turpenes gone. Nearly flat line in that area.

 

I think GW did the right thing by adding the peppermint. It calms the stomach .. everyone knows that :) I might need to add some also.

 

 

From what I have read live plants should not be producing CBN, so I think you could call this a good thing. CBN is caused by degradation of THC off the plant, I believe.

 

I am sure my new friend cannalytics can correct me if I'm wrong.

 

ZapatosUnidos is correct. Living cannabis plants do not contain enzymes for producing CBN, or THC and CBD for that matter. THC, CBD, and CBN are all produced by non-enzymatic, spontaneous degradation processes. THCA and CBDA (and CBCA) are synthesized within the living plant from the same common precursor, CBGA. CBN is formed from the degradation of THC once the plant is harvested. In the samples that we've analyzed, only about 7% of the maximum available THC in dried plant material exists in the decarboxylated THC form, while the other 93% exists in the acidic THCA form originally produced by the plant. Considering the minimal amount of THC present in dried plant material, it is no surprise that most plant samples also have very low levels of CBN.

 

The same "Chemical Ecology of Cannabis" article referenced above that discussed the relationship of UV exposure to cannabinoid profiles also includes information on the effects of soil nutrients, although most of the articles referenced are from the 70s. It appears that the link to the article may be broken, so I have made a PDF available here: http://www.micannalytics.com/learn/Chemical-Ecology-of-Cannabis.pdf

 

PeanutButter also brings up a very good point that molecules obtained from non-cannabis sources, such as beta-caryophyllene, can also bind the cannabinoid receptors exerting similar effects. The strategy of discovering selective CB2 agonists to avoid the psychoactive effects of CB1 stimulation is currently being investigated by many pharmaceutical companies.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caryophyllene

http://www.pnas.org/content/105/26/9099.long

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