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Couple Start Center For Marijuana Users (Pt Huron)


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KIMBALL TWP. -- A local couple has opened a medical marijuana compassion center, a gathering place they said is needed and a business that has township officials riled.

p-e4m3Yko6bFYVc.gif?labels=NewsAndReference "There is a great need for this in our community. We have a lot of sick people," said Jim Amsdill, who opened the Blue Water Compassion Center with his wife, Debra.

 

Jim Amsdill said the center opened in the Sawmill Commons, 4731 Lapeer Road, about two months ago.

 

He said the response has been overwhelming, with a few new patients stopping in each day.

 

"We didn't realize the need was that bad. ... we knew we had a problem here, but we never expected to see as much as we have," he said.

 

The center is a gathering place for medical marijuana patients and caregivers, he said. They distribute information about medical marijuana and can assist people through the process of becoming registered with the state. A physician is expected to be brought onto the staff within a month.

 

The center also helps determine which strain of marijuana would best suit an individual patient's needs and how it should be taken, Jim Amsdill said.

 

Debra Amsdill said registered patients also are able to obtain their medication at the center through a network of state-registered caregivers.

 

But while Amsdill said they are helping residents, the township said they are violating a moratorium.

 

The township board approved a six-month moratorium on medical marijuana compassion centers in April.

 

Rob Usakowski, township supervisor, said the center was issued a ticket for violating the moratorium about a week ago. The township could continue ticketing the center every day it's in violation.

 

The Amsdills are considering filing a civil suit claiming the township is violating their right to operate the center.

 

The moratorium was put in place to give officials time to develop a zoning ordinance and find where a compassion center would best fit since the law doesn't mention them, Usakowski said.

 

Such centers exist in other states that have passed medical marijuana legislation, and the laws governing such centers vary by state.

 

"Our intention is not to stop them from doing business. Our responsibility as a board is to protect the safety and health of the community," Usakowski said.

Jim Amsdill said he and his wife were upfront about their business and brought a business proposal to the township to make sure officials understood what they were doing.

 

He said they are not allowing patients to medicate at the site, but he said they likely will soon.

 

The Amsdills said the patients who use the center are in their 40s to 70s.

 

The couple has a petition supporting the business at the center. As of Thursday afternoon, more than 100 people had signed it and written comments thanking the Amsdills for bringing the center to the area.

 

The Amsdills pleaded guilty to multiple drug-related felonies in 2006. State officials have said that does not prevent them from operating a medical-marijuana related business.

 

"We're here to help the community," Jim Amsdill said.

 

The couple also is looking at opening a "cannabis college" to educate people about medical marijuana.

 

Rick Ferris, a Croswell native who now lives in Hazel Park, said he has helped open two compassion centers and is affiliated with a third. The 46-year-old said he is a registered medical marijuana patient. He has lymphedema, a buildup of lymphatic fluid that causes swelling, usually in an arm or leg.

 

Ferris also is involved in the publication of the Michigan Medical Marijuana magazine and manufactures growing supplies.

 

He said compassion centers are needed and a safe place for people to gather and obtain medication rather than buying it on the street.

 

His centers are in Dryden, Oak Park and Benton Harbor. Ferris said there is a room where people can use marijuana at the Oak Park and Benton Harbor sites. The people who use the room generally are driven by a family member or friend, Ferris said.

 

He said he is in talks with several municipalities about opening more. He said he has not encountered any roadblocks from local officials at the first three centers.

 

http://www.thetimesh...AID=20105090312

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  • 3 years later...
  • 2 months later...

I visited when they opened. Unkept, pistol carrying tie-dye scene . I've visited since the shut downs and there is no more access without registration, and the greeting was pleasant. A caregiver would be a fool to visit with hopes of sales. All records are on file, and are always confiscated during every raid. Be safe !  The guy owner was loud, abrasive, combative, and in jail on unrelated charges, his wife is a sweetheart lady with class and direction. I wish them both the best.

I did meet the two running the  Blue Water Compassion Center and would see them sometimes at some events  does anyone know what happen to them and are they still open?

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maybe dispensaries are necessary for

A)   those patients needing only small amounts of cannabis at a time, and don't mind paying twice the cost

B)   Patients wishing to supplement their own caregiver's supply variety

C)  Advocates to meet and make plans, take actions, to free the weed

D)  Caregivers to sell their overages, to help recoup their costs, and keep the product within the legal supply line

E)  Permitted growers to legally obtain genetics, and share their prized phenotypes

 

Most EVERY club opened has been raided at gunpoint, while patients were present, making them a more dangerous place to exchange cannabis than a legitimate caregiver/patient meeting for thought. People have always been able to procure their needed marijuana, but the best chance of quality is to complete the legal process, interview and select a proper caregiver, and compensate them for their efforts. Dispensaries have traditionally been busted for selling product other than that produced locally, legally, the same bags most of us used to get 20 yrs ago.  Legitimate patients deserve better, imo.

 

farm out !

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maybe dispensaries are necessary for

A)   those patients needing only small amounts of cannabis at a time, and don't mind paying twice the cost

B)   Patients wishing to supplement their own caregiver's supply variety

C)  Advocates to meet and make plans, take actions, to free the weed

D)  Caregivers to sell their overages, to help recoup their costs, and keep the product within the legal supply line

E)  Permitted growers to legally obtain genetics, and share their prized phenotypes

 

Most EVERY club opened has been raided at gunpoint, while patients were present, making them a more dangerous place to exchange cannabis than a legitimate caregiver/patient meeting for thought. People have always been able to procure their needed marijuana, but the best chance of quality is to complete the legal process, interview and select a proper caregiver, and compensate them for their efforts. Dispensaries have traditionally been busted for selling product other than that produced locally, legally, the same bags most of us used to get 20 yrs ago.  Legitimate patients deserve better, imo.

 

farm out !

 

A)  Caregivers can provide that service.  One of my patients buys a quarter ounce every two months, and I don't charge him twice as much like a dispensary does.

B)  I grow six different strains.  I know caregivers that grow at least three times that between them.  I can certainly provide a number of strains.  Again, this is a service that a good caregiver can supply.

C)  That's actually the definition of what a Compassion Club is, not a dispensary.

D)  The Michigan Supreme Court has ruled that selling overages to a dispensary is illegal.

E)  Registered patients and caregivers are allowed to obtain genetics anywhere under the law.  To share genetics, all you have to do is register as the patients caregiver and let them keep possession of the plants.  This is another service that a good caregiver could provide.

 

With a good network of top quality caregivers, dispensaries wouldn't even be needed.  A group of Compassion Clubs can provide that network.

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A)  Caregivers can provide that service.  One of my patients buys a quarter ounce every two months, and I don't charge him twice as much like a dispensary does.

B)  I grow six different strains.  I know caregivers that grow at least three times that between them.  I can certainly provide a number of strains.  Again, this is a service that a good caregiver can supply.

C)  That's actually the definition of what a Compassion Club is, not a dispensary.

D)  The Michigan Supreme Court has ruled that selling overages to a dispensary is illegal.

E)  Registered patients and caregivers are allowed to obtain genetics anywhere under the law.  To share genetics, all you have to do is register as the patients caregiver and let them keep possession of the plants.  This is another service that a good caregiver could provide.

 

With a good network of top quality caregivers, dispensaries wouldn't even be needed.  A group of Compassion Clubs can provide that network.

If five patients each only needed a quarter ounce a month my electric bill would not get paid

I cycle 25 strains constantly, but not all are ready for patients at one time, like a dispensary ,club, provisioning center, may provide

I've never seen a legal definition of "Compassion Club vs Dispensary, but believe me, every one I've been to act identically

behind closed doors, wink wink. I do believe that a club would be safe than a street sale, but what legally registered person still buys on the street ?

Of course provisioning centers are illegal, but if they were not, selling overages to one of them would sure help to compensate costs incurred by five 1/8 ounce a month patients for sure.

Many patients growing for themselves cannot give their plant possession to a caregiver, because they're growing them. When they need new genetics a club of any sort would be convenient, and would not involve mailing.

 

Their are many examples of great provisioning centers worldwide, and in our country. There are successful caregiver/patient models surrounding them that are very thankful for their existence. I don't provide quarter ounce deliveries incidentally because I cannot. If I was limited to five quarter ounce patients per month to service I would grow 12 for myself, and toss up the biz of patient interviewing and patient management, leaving that for the pro's who can do it successfully. I've never met a patient who uses less than an ounce per month, and some of mine use an ounce per week. Finding them, establishing compatibility, and properly assessing their needs is the real work.

 

grassmatch

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yep, and losing your grow rights during and as a result of a home raid is damned scary all by itself, as you know. Selling marijuana to one of these clubs has resulted in  sellers being raided, robbed at gunpoint by badges, court date, and the loss of their grow rights.  that's enough to keep me away from them for sure !

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