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Letter To The Reps


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I've written my letter to each of the 110 reps in Michigan. I desprately want to inform them how Important our issues are and express the tyranny that has been imposed on those in compliance with the act.

It was a bit of a task but it is doable. Will you join me? They need to hear us. Tell them the stories. This is the only way they will hear us.

http://www.house.michigan.gov/replist.asp

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Great idea! Here's a short guide for those who are new at it.

 

 

Letters to Congress

 

By Robert Longley , About.com Guide

 

 

 

People who think members of Congress pay little or no attention to constituent mail, are plain wrong. Concise, well thought out personal letters are one of the most effective ways Americans have of influencing law-makers. But, members of Congress get hundreds of letters and emails every day. Whether you choose to use the Postal Service or email, here are some tips that will help your letter have impact.

 

Think Locally

It's usually best to send letters to the representative from your local Congressional District or the senators from your state. Your vote helps elect them -- or not -- and that fact alone carries a lot of weight. It also helps personalize your letter. Sending the same "cookie-cutter" message to every member of Congress may grab attention but rarely much consideration.

 

Keep it Simple

Your letter should address a single topic or issue. Typed, one-page letters are best. Many PACs (Political Action Committees) recommend a three-paragraph letter structured like this:

 

1. Say why you are writing and who you are. List your "credentials." (If you want a response, you must include your name and address, even when using email.)

2. Provide more detail. Be factual not emotional. Provide specific rather than general information about how the topic affects you and others. If a certain bill is involved, cite the correct title or number whenever possible.

3. Close by requesting the action you want taken: a vote for or against a bill, or change in general policy.

 

The best letters are courteous, to the point, and include specific supporting examples.

 

Addressing Members of Congress

 

To Your Senator:

 

The Honorable (full name)

(Room #) (Name) Senate Office Building

United States Senate

Washington, DC 20510

 

Dear Senator:

 

To Your Representative:

 

The Honorable (full name)

(Room #) (Name) House Office Building

United States House of Representatives

Washington, DC 20515

 

Dear Representative:

 

The above addresses should be used in email messages, as well as those sent through the Postal Service.

 

Finding Their Addresses

Senate and House of Representatives

 

U.S. Senators (web sites and mailing addresses)

 

Write Your U.S. Representative (A service of the House that will assist you by identifying your Congressperson in the U.S. House of Representatives and providing contact information.

 

U.S. Supreme Court

Contact Information - US Supreme Court

The Justices do not have email addresses, but they do read letters from citizens.

 

To Conclude

Here are some key things you should always and never do in writing to your elected representatives.

 

1. Be courteous and respectful without "gushing."

2. Clearly and simply state the purpose of your letter. If it's about a certain bill, identify it correctly. If you need help in finding the number of a bill, use the Thomas Legislative Information System.

3. Say who you are. Anonymous letters go nowhere. Even in email, include your correct name, address, phone number and email address. If you don't include at least your name and address, you will not get a response.

4. State any professional credentials or personal experience you may have, especially those pertaining to the subject of your letter.

5. Keep your letter short -- one page is best.

6. Use specific examples or evidence to support your position.

7. State what it is you want done or recommend a course of action.

8. Thank the member for taking the time to read your letter.

 

Never

 

1. Use vulgarity, profanity, or threats. The first two are just plain rude and the third one can get you a visit from the Secret Service. Simply stated, don't let your passion get in the way of making your point,

2. Fail to include your name and address, even in email letters.

3. Demand a response.

 

Identifying Legislation

 

Cite these legislation identifiers when writing to members of Congress:

 

House Bills: "H.R._____"

House Resolutions: "H.RES._____"

House Joint Resolutions: "H.J.RES._____"

Senate Bills: "S._____"

Senate Resolutions: "S.RES._____"

Senate Joint Resolutions: "S.J.RES._____"

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Thanks for the info!

 

For anyone who doesn't know, and for those who've forgotten, there are letter-writing threads at this site, they don't show up unless they're active, just like any other thread, so many don't realize they exist. I even have a thread on commonly misspelled words which took me at least 6 hours to write, I love writing and thoroughly enjoyed it. Most the definitions I used I wrote myself, a few I had to look up. All the example sentences were my creation, I chose ones that reflected our community. So there are lots of informative threads on here, there's a letter-writing one that has various suggestions on how to write to the reps, too. I wish they could all be put together so they'd be easy to find. The right search terms could prob'ly show them all. It's always good to see more interest in doing things like this. Our letters helped slow down a bill called SB17, which may even be dead in that form of it, though it may've been dissected and put somewhere else, so we have to be aware and take action. many of us wrote letters that we shared with the site, to help inspire others to write, and help some who have trouble with knowing how to write that kind of letter. A program was put together where some of our letters were used a samples, for anyone to use and personalize. That program is able to send mass mailings and was set up to be sent to all the reps. We have to keep up on what legislation is being proposed, so we can keep writing. That is as important as going to rallies and trials. Do whatever you can, eveery little bit helps strengthen our community and helps our cause. Keep writing, whether you do it from this site or on your own. Thanks for helping! :thumbsu:

 

Sincerely, Sb :)

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More replys coming in. Reps are saying that sb0017 hasn't hit the floor yet but if it does these issues will be brought up. It's very rewardig hearing back from these people. Please write your district reps. Beig a voter in their district is a huge sway for many of these reps.

Just really excited to be doing somthing.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I got a positive letter from a rep about HR1983, that I'd like to share. he's a doctor, too, how about that? -Sb

 

June 14, 2011

 

 

Thank you for taking the time to communicate with me regarding medical marijuana. As your elected representative, I appreciate the opportunity to learn your views, and I also happen to agree with you.

 

As you may know, the "States' Medical Marijuana Patient Protection Act," and other legislation protecting medical marijuana users were introduced in the House. If enacted, H.R. 1983 would prohibit any provision of the "Controlled Substances Act" from restricting state laws legalizing the use of medical marijuana. Additionally, this measure would provide for the reclassification of marijuana, recognizing the plant's accepted medical use.

 

I am in favor of using marijuana for medical purposes. As a general surgeon, I am aware of the therapeutic benefits marijuana can provide to individuals suffering from a serious illness or chronic pain. In my opinion, state laws can regulate the use of marijuana for medical purposes, while ensuring that it is not used illegally. The Tenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution expresses the principle of federalism: powers not granted to the federal government nor prohibited to the states by the Constitution are reserved, respectively, to the states or the people. In my judgment, the federal government is prohibited from interfering with state health laws, which properly reflect the will of citizens of the various states.

 

This bill has been referred to the House Committee on Energy and Commerce. Although I do not serve on this committee, should H.R. 1983 come to the floor of the House for a vote, be assured I will carefully consider this legislation with your views in mind.

 

Again, thank you for taking the time to share with me your opinion—I value hearing from you.

 

Sincerely,

Dan Benishek M. D.

Member of Congress

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I got a positive letter from a rep about HR1983, that I'd like to share. he's a doctor, too, how about that? -Sb

 

June 14, 2011

 

 

Thank you for taking the time to communicate with me regarding medical marijuana. As your elected representative, I appreciate the opportunity to learn your views, and I also happen to agree with you.

 

As you may know, the "States' Medical Marijuana Patient Protection Act," and other legislation protecting medical marijuana users were introduced in the House. If enacted, H.R. 1983 would prohibit any provision of the "Controlled Substances Act" from restricting state laws legalizing the use of medical marijuana. Additionally, this measure would provide for the reclassification of marijuana, recognizing the plant's accepted medical use.

 

I am in favor of using marijuana for medical purposes. As a general surgeon, I am aware of the therapeutic benefits marijuana can provide to individuals suffering from a serious illness or chronic pain. In my opinion, state laws can regulate the use of marijuana for medical purposes, while ensuring that it is not used illegally. The Tenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution expresses the principle of federalism: powers not granted to the federal government nor prohibited to the states by the Constitution are reserved, respectively, to the states or the people. In my judgment, the federal government is prohibited from interfering with state health laws, which properly reflect the will of citizens of the various states.

 

This bill has been referred to the House Committee on Energy and Commerce. Although I do not serve on this committee, should H.R. 1983 come to the floor of the House for a vote, be assured I will carefully consider this legislation with your views in mind.

 

Again, thank you for taking the time to share with me your opinion—I value hearing from you.

 

Sincerely,

Dan Benishek M. D.

Member of Congress

 

 

Way to go SB!!

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  • 2 months later...

Speaking of Dr. Dan, he's one of the few who's been responsive to my letters, so I decided to write back regarding the war on drugs. I think it's important for us to continue trying to get a dialog going with these reps. This man is all for medical use, too, so I thought it'd be a good place to start, emphasizing the terrible toll this war has taken on our medical community. The DPA letter explains how this war has failed, and the waste of resources, all the usual facts we are all well aware of. Here's the Congressman's response, then my response which hasn't been sent yet. -Sb

 

September 14, 2011

 

 

Dear ___:

 

Thank you for making the effort to contact me regarding the "War on Drugs." As your elected representative, I appreciate the

opportunity to learn your opinion on this matter.

 

As you may know, the phrase "War on Drugs" has been used since the Nixon Administration as part of a multi-national campaign to

mitigate narcotic use in the U.S. Part of this campaign involved funding to foreign nations, notably Mexico and Colombia, to assist with anti-narcotic efforts. In 2009, the Obama Administration has signaled that it will end the use of the term "War on Drugs" as a part of the Administration's re-vamping and re-alignment of anti-drug programs.

 

I realize that narcotic control policy is a very broad and complex issue. While I believe it is important that the U.S. does everything

in its power to keep narcotics from harming our society, I believe it makes little sense to continue elements of this campaign that have

failed to deliver results. Although I do not serve on the House Committee on the Judiciary, which has jurisdiction over narcotics policy, should any legislation come to the floor of the House for vote regarding drug enforcement, I will certainly keep your views

in mind.

 

Again, thank you for taking the time to share with me your opinion- I value hearing from you.

 

Sincerely,

Dan Benishek M. D.

Member of Congress

 

P.S. I would also like to invite you to visit my website, www.benishek.house.gov <http:\\benishek.house.gov> , for further

information. If you have not already done so, please submit your email address so that my office may keep you informed on issues in

Congress.

 

Here's my reply, not sent yet:

 

Dear Congressman Benishek,

 

Thank you for your reply. I'm pleased to see you understand there have been failures in this campaign. I'd like to share a few things with you that you may not be aware of on the damage this war has caused:

 

While the term may be dropped from usage, the war rages on. Especially for marijuana. Millions, if not more, are being spent to arrest legal patients, instead of opening research channels to further study the medicinal value of Cannabis. Whether or not they are medical users, thousands of non-violent citizens are being thrown in jail. Many are legitimate medical users, who are denied use of their medicine once prosecuted, jailed, or on probation.

 

Every day I am in contact with patients and caregivers who tell such horror stories, it scares me terribly. A crisis has been manufactured where there is none.

 

Because of the war on drugs, regardless of what they call it, the medical marijuana community is suffering tremendously. I wish the funds being wasted on this war would be better spent in other areas, too, such as educating people about the medical benefits of Cannabis. I know from personal observation of the amazing results experienced by these patients. many who were given a short time to live, are still alive and functioning well enough to enjoy life again. Their friends and families are realizing the true value of this wonderful medicine, too.

 

Thank you again for replying to me, and thank you for realizing there are ineffective elements of this war.

 

Sincerely, _____

 

 

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