Jump to content

Former Atty Gen Mike Cox, For Dispensaries


Recommended Posts

http://mobile.mlive.com/advannarbor/db_/contentdetail.htm?contentguid=GOE75reG&full=true#display

 

Former Michigan Attorney General Mike Cox agrees with his successor: The state's medical marijuana law needs clarification.

 

But unlike current Attorney General Bill Schuette, Cox believes the law should be clarified to legally allow for medical marijuana dispensaries.

 

"Instead of browbeating and trying to make ordinary citizens into criminals, we should allow ways for ordinary citizens to avoid being criminals," Cox said Friday at Wayne State University in Detroit, where he served as the keynote speaker at a symposium on marijuana reform.

 

Cox, who was in office when voters approved the 2008 Medical Marihuana Act but now is practicing law at a private firm, made it a point to avoid direct critique of Schuette, who has promoted a statewide crackdown on so-called "pot shops" in the wake of an appeals court ruling deeming them illegal.

 

But the former gubernatorial hopeful also expressed a belief that dispensaries are consistent with voter intentions, even if they weren't directly referenced in the approved referendum.

 

"The people said that 'if I'm eligible for medical marijuana, I should have access to it.' I would like to see the legislature pass a law that makes way for dispensaries so we don't have these fights."

 

While Cox questioned the current statewide campaign to legalize marijuana outright, his position on dispensaries found favor with many pro-medical marijuana advocates at the symposium.

 

"I wish our current administration would have that mentality," said Debra Amsdill, owner of three Blue Water Compassion Center locations that were raided last month. "I think there's a whole lot of other things and issues in Michigan to be worried about besides throwing patients to the ground who have gone through the hoops to get their state issued cards."

 

Later during the symposium, panelists are expected to explore the discord between state and federal policies and the implications of full decriminalization.

 

Tim Beck, who led the initiative to legalize medical marijuana in Michigan, said he does not see outright legalization in the state's future.

 

"The problem is the level of support in the polls is not there," he said. "It's only about fifty percent in the polls, and once the attack ads start, the numbers won't go up. They'll go down."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i too have no issues with dispensaries. I was not for them in the ballot run, nor when i voted to pass the Act. But the first 2 yrs when we had them showed me the need for them, and the ways they indeed can help the Patients. But I WILL NOT allow the 08 Act to be opened up, altered, changed, even minorly, to allow dispensaries to come into existence with the blessing of the Mi Gov and Legislation.

 

 

The Legislation for dispensaries can be done with complete seperate legislation, and DOES NOT REQUIRE opening the ACT, to allow them.

 

ANY Attempt to open the act, to make even the simplest change of the letter "a" to make it the word "The" will be met with the utmost resistance.

 

If Dispensaries are to come to being, they can be brought to life under a new Peoples Initiative, or Congressional Lesislation.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

that's the law we have on the books... not a constitutional protection... which would be ideal for what you are talking about timmahh. for what we have here, that's likely the 'best' place to put in dispensary clauses... the licensing, regulation & taxation. the question becomes, will private patients & caregivers be able to maintain grow rights... if it goes prohibitive (big money backing big grows where they have the politicians ear), then we may have a problem. but again, that should be protected (patient/caregiver rights) in the constitution.

 

it's so much easier to speak rationally once outta office & one has no political pressure to tow a line, no? pretty sure we have a lot of intelligent people in gov... just can't behave that way. beholden, they are.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

http://mobile.mlive.com/advannarbor/db_/contentdetail.htm?contentguid=GOE75reG&full=true#display

 

Former Michigan Attorney General Mike Cox agrees with his successor: The state's medical marijuana law needs clarification.

 

But unlike current Attorney General Bill Schuette, Cox believes the law should be clarified to legally allow for medical marijuana dispensaries.

 

"Instead of browbeating and trying to make ordinary citizens into criminals, we should allow ways for ordinary citizens to avoid being criminals," Cox said Friday at Wayne State University in Detroit, where he served as the keynote speaker at a symposium on marijuana reform.

 

Cox, who was in office when voters approved the 2008 Medical Marihuana Act but now is practicing law at a private firm, made it a point to avoid direct critique of Schuette, who has promoted a statewide crackdown on so-called "pot shops" in the wake of an appeals court ruling deeming them illegal.

 

But the former gubernatorial hopeful also expressed a belief that dispensaries are consistent with voter intentions, even if they weren't directly referenced in the approved referendum.

 

"The people said that 'if I'm eligible for medical marijuana, I should have access to it.' I would like to see the legislature pass a law that makes way for dispensaries so we don't have these fights."

 

While Cox questioned the current statewide campaign to legalize marijuana outright, his position on dispensaries found favor with many pro-medical marijuana advocates at the symposium.

 

"I wish our current administration would have that mentality," said Debra Amsdill, owner of three Blue Water Compassion Center locations that were raided last month. "I think there's a whole lot of other things and issues in Michigan to be worried about besides throwing patients to the ground who have gone through the hoops to get their state issued cards."

 

Later during the symposium, panelists are expected to explore the discord between state and federal policies and the implications of full decriminalization.

 

Tim Beck, who led the initiative to legalize medical marijuana in Michigan, said he does not see outright legalization in the state's future.

 

"The problem is the level of support in the polls is not there," he said. "It's only about fifty percent in the polls, and once the attack ads start, the numbers won't go up. They'll go down."

 

 

practicing law at a private firm im sure he is ready to take on a big marijuana case now

 

 

 

Tim Beck, who led the initiative to legalize medical marijuana in Michigan, said he does not see outright legalization in the state's future.

 

"The problem is the level of support in the polls is not there," he said. "It's only about fifty percent in the polls, and once the attack ads start, the numbers won't go up. They'll go down."

i think he is right it wont work just yet

 

he knows

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i too have no issues with dispensaries. I was not for them in the ballot run, nor when i voted to pass the Act. But the first 2 yrs when we had them showed me the need for them, and the ways they indeed can help the Patients. But I WILL NOT allow the 08 Act to be opened up, altered, changed, even minorly, to allow dispensaries to come into existence with the blessing of the Mi Gov and Legislation.

 

 

The Legislation for dispensaries can be done with complete seperate legislation, and DOES NOT REQUIRE opening the ACT, to allow them.

 

ANY Attempt to open the act, to make even the simplest change of the letter "a" to make it the word "The" will be met with the utmost resistance.

 

If Dispensaries are to come to being, they can be brought to life under a new Peoples Initiative, or Congressional Lesislation.

i think your right i used to feel the same way until i was told the same things as you said

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Even if the legalization doesn't' pass just getting it on the ballot moves the pendulum of discrimination . It familiarizes individuals , spurs debate which educates . When the act first occured I was much more conservative until I saw the cruelty of enforcement which has stressed patients . I am behind BB when it comes to calling out persons making claims about hazards that are not true . Most people have common sense and many of us were on our last legs until this gave us some relief . I just can't imagine how people can justify the terrible penalties that are putting patients saftey at risk .

Edited by Croppled1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sure makes me nervous when I find myself agreeing with Mike Cox, particularly on a social issue, but I had to rejoice when the state legislature should pass a bill allowing and regulating medical marijuana dispensaries. He also expressed his legal opinion that dispensaries are consistent with voter intentions, even if they weren't directly referenced in the approved referendum. "The people said that 'if I'm eligible for medical marijuana, I should have access to it.' I would like to see the legislature pass a law that makes way for dispensaries so we don't have thesefights." I'd say that means it could be one without touching the original language the people passed in 2010 - and that's a good thing.

 

Having Cox on the regular people’s side may be odd – but we might as well take full advantage of it. One of his GOPer buddies in the legislature should go ahead and introduce a bill setting-up agovernment-sanctioned, free enterprise distribution model. How can Republicans be against that? While they’re at it, rules should do what they did in Arizona and Colorado, only Michigan-owned-businesses should be eligible to apply.

 

First, and foremost, implementing such a dispensary system would mean that tens of thousands of Michigan residents would finally be able to purchase the medicine their doctorrecommends (medicine that has been tested for safety and labeled with accurateand useful information).

 

Plus, there is every reason to believe there could be thousands of new jobs for thepeople of Michigan.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share



×
×
  • Create New...