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A Case Study In A State Reverting From Medical 420?


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What is happening with Montana?  I heard that patient numbers are way down and pieces of their law have been legislated away?  And the speaker forecast that in 5 years Montana will be a use-to-be medical state?

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In this case, it was abuse of the law by dispensary and monied interests.

 

They went too far.

 

One doctor doing "caravans" and signing 300 people up in an afternoon.  Large scale dispensaries that the law did not permit. A Federal Prosecutor willing to stop them from even exceeding state law, let alone Federal. And, a Legislature that did stop them by changing their law to be very very strict and only usable by a smaller group of people.

 

 That is what happens when you abuse the peoples law. 

 

 Don't like it myself. Bummer to see it happen,... but greedy stupid commercial people caused most of Montana's problems.

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Oh ya I forgot... Its always the dispensaries fault.

 

 

 btw, don't ya get tired of telling me I am wrong only to find out I was right most the time?

 

 I just figured it must get tiring...

 

 Have ya seen what the dispensary interests are doing to patients and caregivers in Nevada?

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Ya Ive seen the proposed amendment. Or is it final now?

 

You rarely ever prove what you say and you mostly speculate. That is what I am tired of.

 

You say abuse of the law by dispensary and monied interests. They would not be able to abuse the law if the people did not want them to be abusing it. Marijuana did not come to these states because they passed medical laws. Its been there the whole time. There is nothing magical about med laws. People want to be able to acquire marijuana and most of them don't care where it comes from. You do. Oh well. You blame the doctor and forget it is the 300 people asking the doctor to do it. They are asking the dispensary network to be there. Dispensaries are not going anywhere, you'll just have to accept that one day. If there was no demand for them they would not be there. Keep fighting for that prohibition. Your doing good work.

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So, let's take a looksy at what dispensaries and they lobbyists(MPP/ASA) are doing in Nevada:

 

-----------

Email from MPP:

 

Nevada: Medical marijuana dispensary vote imminent; act now!

Call or email your assembly member today.

 

Dear Gerome:

 

Nearly 13 years after 65% of Nevada voters enacted a constitutional amendment that required the state legislature to authorize “appropriate methods” of supply of medical marijuana, the legislature could finally do so. The Assembly will vote on S.B. 374 today or tomorrow, and it’s crucial that your assembly member hear from you before casting his or her vote.

Please call or email your assembly member today to ask him or her to fulfill the will of voters and his or her constitutional duty.

 
Last year, Judge Donald Mosley found that the state’s 2001 medical marijuana law was “absurd,” unconstitutional, and “ridiculous.” It fails to allow patients to buy their medicine, and instead relies on them growing it themselves or having an individual caregiver do so. The Assembly Judiciary Committee and the Senate have both approved S.B. 374, which would fix this by allowing state-regulated dispensaries and growers. The most recent version of the bill would allow current patients to cultivate until April 2016. Any patient could cultivate if they don’t live near a dispensary.

The legislature will adjourn tomorrow night, so it’s crucial you act now to make sure patients finally have a reasonable supply of their medicine. Then, ask your friends and family in Nevada to do the same.

-----------------------------------------------------------

 

Now, let's not forget that Nevada already allows Medical marihuana similar to Michigan with patients and caregivers who are allowed to grow 7 plants and have 1 ounce. 

 

So, it seems they will be removing the home growing rights from people.  Imagine that!  Surprise!! Surprise!!

 

 So let's take a closer look at this bill being pushed by MPP and ASA.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

 

SB 374 of Nevada

 

5. A medical marijuana dispensary and a cultivation facility may acquire usable marijuana or marijuana plants from a patient who holds a valid registry identification card, or the designated primary caregiver of such a patient. Except as otherwise provided in this subsection, the patient or caregiver, as applicable, must receive no compensation for the marijuana. A patient who holds a valid registry identification card, and the designated primary caregiver of such a patient, may sell usable marijuana to a medical marijuana dispensary one time and may sell marijuana plants to a cultivation facility one time.

 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Well isn't that just special.

 

 How dandy of the dispensaries to allow a patient or caregiver to sell to them ONE time. Awww.... I hear pennies and crocodile tears rolling down the alley. O wait!!!.... Not even pennies rolling down the alley; they expect the patients and caregivers to just give it to them for FREE that one time they are allowed. 

 

Hmmm,... let's see what other special things the dispensaries managed to get in their bill....

 

---------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Sec. 19.6. 1. Each medical marijuana dispensary shall, at
 the time of making a sale of marijuana or edible marijuana
 products, or both, collect a flat fee of $10 for deposit in the State General Fund.

 

 2. The fee described in subsection 1 is to be applied in
 addition to any overhead or administrative costs of the medical
 marijuana dispensary in making the sale, and in addition to any
 profit made by the medical marijuana dispensary on the sale.

 

3. As used in this section, “sale” means a single completed
 purchase, regardless of the number of individual items included in the purchase.

 

----------------------------------------------------------------

 

So,... every time someone only buys a gram or a single brownie, they have to pay a $10 fee over the cost.  Good thing they are keeping the poor patients in mind with this bill. I was getting worried there<sarc>.

 

 Anyhow,... what other goodies are in this bill as I skim over it...

 

 

Ohhhhhhhh...<dower sounding>

 

 

I see now.  Yeap.... here we go. That thing I always warn people about that never happens.

 

Heh.

 

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

6. Notwithstanding any other provision of law and except as
 otherwise provided in this subsection, after a medical marijuana
 dispensary opens in the county of residence of a person who holds
 a registry identification card or his or her designated primary
 caregiver, if any, such persons are not authorized to cultivate,
 grow or produce marijuana.

 

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Ahhh yes.

 

As is happening in all dispensary interested states anymore. Home growing is going away. MPP has directly stated they don't believe home growing is the best way to procede and doesn't do well in the polls,... according to their polls paid for by yes.... dispensaries. Heh.

 

So,... no home growing when a dispensary opens in your COUNTY!  Ain't that just special.  Makes ya all warm and fuzzy aye OG?  Good thing they have your undying and unwavering support.

 

Alright,... moving on,... what else is  in this bill on fast glance:

 

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

 

A patient or caregiver:
 

 

(b) Do not, at any one time, collectively possess, deliver or

produce more than:

(1) [One ounce] Two and one-half ounces of usable marijuana [;] in any one 14-day period;
 

 

--------------------------------------------------------

 

This is what happens when language crosses over between laws.  Buy wanting dispensaries to only be able to sell 2.5 oz to a patient every 14 days, they have screwd over the few patients that may still be able to grow.

Patients can now only PRODUCE 2.5 oz every 14 days now.  Heh. So much for a 10 day rotation!

 

 But hey, you can buy your hash oil at the dispensary anyhow. What does it matter?

 

What other little gems are in this law?

 

Well, I see where they have reciprocity only if the dispensaries are allowed full access to your states(Michigans) confidential database.  Hmm,... sounds like a great idea!

 

 

Ahh well.

 

Anyone who doesn't believe home growing rights are under assault is crazy.  This is one the main reasons I fight so hard in Michigan. I truly believe, Michigan may have been the 16th state to legalize medical marijuana, but will likely be one of the last that allows home growing(for the time being).  As states, dispensaries(MPP,ASA) and commercialization becomes the number one priority for lobbying groups, we systematicly watch them rip away rights from patients and caregivers in favor of taxes, profits, narrow supply and limited accessibility at a high cost.
 

 

 Peace.

 

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You rarely ever prove what you say and you mostly speculate. That is what I am tired of.

 

You say abuse of the law by dispensary and monied interests. They would not be able to abuse the law if the people did not want them to be abusing it. Marijuana did not come to these states because they passed medical laws. Its been there the whole time. There is nothing magical about med laws. People want to be able to acquire marijuana and most of them don't care where it comes from. You do. Oh well. You blame the doctor and forget it is the 300 people asking the doctor to do it. They are asking the dispensary network to be there. Dispensaries are not going anywhere, you'll just have to accept that one day. If there was no demand for them they would not be there. Keep fighting for that prohibition. Your doing good work.

 

.I can only show and tell the truth so much. I don't need to sit and type over and over the same things and post the same proof.

 

 Anyone who has followed my postings can definitely say I have plastered proof all over the place. I mean, even their own testimony and words.

 

 There will likely be some type of commercialization eventually. But at what cost? 

 

 Enter me.

 

 I will fight for home growing. You may want it,... but you obviously aren't willing to fight the good fight for it.  Like a lamb to the slaughter.  They waft sweet smells of temptation as they take your rights and privileges away and call you the criminal while they do it.

 

It isn't the fact that some type of dispensary/market/commercialization will be there,... the question is,... in what form will it appear.

 

Home growing is being thrown under the bus.  It does not need to be. But this is the path that has been chosen and is being implemented across the country by MPP, DPA, ASA and myriad others.

 

Unfortunately,... there are sides to this.  You may have to pick one eventually. 

 

 I will be here waiting when you do finally make up your mind.

 

 

p.s.  Let's also make clear that it is a MINORITY of patients that need a dispensary. Dispensaries are not for the masses, they are for a minority and do not serve the greater need of the community. :-)

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I mean, the sad thing is is that we have to waste our time fighting against dispensaries trying to steal our grow rights away, when I would MUCH rather be spending more time fighting nonsense like this:

 

 

 

 

Newshawk: Support Sensible BC: http://sensiblebc.ca
Pubdate: Sat, 01 Jun 2013
Source: Monroe Evening News (MI)
Copyright: 2013, The Monroe Evening News
Contact: letters@monroenews.com
Website: http://www.monroenews.com/
Details: http://www.mapinc.org/media/2302
Author: Dean Cousino

MARIJUANA EDUCATION FOR MONROE COUNTY STUDENTS, EDUCATORS

In more than 90 percent of overdose deaths in southeastern Michigan,
the individuals also tested positive for THC - the active ingredient
in marijuana.

This was not the cause of death, but is just something more to think
about when you hear someone say that marijuana isn't dangerous, said
April Demers of the Monroe County Substance Abuse Coalition.

"There are a lot of misconceptions going around. That's why we're
focused on this problem. It may suggest that using marijuana may
increase the likelihood that someone who uses marijuana may be more
prone to make other choices that are life threatening," she said.

Ms. Demers and John Basile of the Monroe County Intermediate School
District have paired up to give more than 30 Power Point
presentations in middle schools and high schools around the county
since December.

The talks, "Marijuana in the New Millenium," focus on the latest
research and trends on marijuana, considered the No. 1 drug abused in
the region.

"It's become the new drug of choice in the community and always has
been," Mr. Basile said.

The coalition held a similar talk today for professional and staff
workers in the community at the Salvation Army Harbor Light Center.
Ms. Demers, community and youth developer for the coalition, said
problems with marijuana are getting worse based on conversations with
school officials attending the sessions.

"This needs to be addressed," she told the coalition earlier this
month. "They're sharing their frustrations (about) the attitudes of
kids who feel it's not a big deal. We have to help them understand
that marijuana is not medicine and is very much illegal."


There's some confusion, too, due to recent changes in the Michigan
Medical Marijuana Program that took effect April 1. One of the more
significant changes is that patients must carry marijuana in a case
in their trunk when traveling.

Consumers know that medical marijuana was legalized by a popular
vote. However, marijuana's use continues to be illegal on the federal
level and is not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration, she said.

"Is it a gateway drug to other drugs?" Ms. Demers asked. "Not for
everyone, but people who use crack cocaine or heroin almost always
started with marijuana."

A criminal charge of minor in possession (MIP) stays on an
individual's record until the age of 30, not 18 which is a common
misbelief, she said.

"This will affect things like college admissions, scholarships, job
applications and enlisting in the military, she said.

Joseph Costello, chief assistant prosecutor for the county, said he
recently spoke with a female staff member at Monroe Public Schools
who told him that some students are coming to school with the smell
of marijuana on them.

"She said they are reeking with marijuana. What can we do about that?" he said.

He added that law enforcement should be contacted to educate the
public that people are "not supposed to have it in their homes."

Both Mr. Basile and Ms. Demers bring a marijuana plant into the
classrooms when they speak.

"It really engages them," she said.

Some of the candy and food products that push marijuana use include
Pot Tarts, Munchy Way, PuffA-Mint and Keef Kat.

"A lot of manufacturing and advertising trends target young people,"
she said. "It is significant. If you get caught, it can stay on your
record" a lot longer than people think.

Mr. Basile said he would check into scheduling a presentation this
fall for teachers and school staff as part of a countywide in-service day.

For more information about the coalition and its activities, go to
www.monroedrugfree.org

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Just an article today I got. Here is how wonderful it is when a State only allows Dispensaries:

 

 

 

Newshawk: Support Sensible BC: http://sensiblebc.ca
Pubdate: Sun, 02 Jun 2013
Source: Courier-Post (Cherry Hill, NJ)
Webpage: http://drugsense.org/url/MAUtmcUB
Copyright: 2013 Courier-Post
Contact: midaniels@camden.gannett.com
Website: http://www.courierpostonline.com/
Details: http://www.mapinc.org/media/826
Author: Kim Mulford

MEDICAL MARIJUANA IS HARD TO GET FOR LOCAL PATIENTS

When you think of medical marijuana patients, Richard Caporusso of
Medford Lakes wants you to think of people like him.

A former corrections officer, the 33-year-old was forced to retire
from his state job in 2010 due to neck injuries he sustained
restraining an inmate. Caporusso compares his chronic pain to an
intense electrical shock.

"It literally feels like lightning bolts coming down your hands,"
said the Medford Lakes resident. "There are times that I've been up
for hours in agony."

A regimen of doctor-prescribed pain medications - Celebrex, Lyrica
and Vicodin - made him feel like "garbage" and left him lethargic and
sick. Eventually, the combination ulcerated his stomach and esophagus.

The best medicine for neurological pain, each doctor told him, is
marijuana. Though at the time of his injury New Jersey had already
legalized medical marijuana, Caporusso could not get the relief he
sought until last December, when the state's first alternative
treatment center opened in Montclair, Essex County.

He's one of the few.

"It's the only thing I use for pain," Caporusso noted. "It's the only
thing that works."

Three and a half years after Gov. Jon Corzine signed the New Jersey
Compassionate Use Medical Marijuana Act, only 124 people have been
able to buy marijuana from a state-approved alternative treatment
center. That accounts for about 13 percent of New Jersey's 946
card-carrying medical marijuana patients.

Medical marijuana advocates blame Gov. Chris Christie's
administration for the delays, and say strict regulations have made
it too difficult and expensive for patients to get prescribed
marijuana. The governor and former prosecutor opposes legalizing
marijuana for medicinal use because the drug is still prohibited
under federal law.

Patients and their supporters plan to air their complaints at a
protest rally Friday in Trenton, said Ken Wolski, CEO of the
Coalition for Medical Marijuana New Jersey.

The organization contends the state's own rules have caused the
delay. Among them are rigorous background checks on alternative
treatment center employees and restrictions on levels of the
pain-relieving compound THC from cannibas plants grown inside tightly
secured warehouses.

"We just say the program is absolutely dysfunctional," said Wolski, a
registered nurse.

Indeed, "we're hearing stories every single day about patients all
over the state that don't have access to (their) medicine," observed
Evan Nison, executive director of New Jersey NORML, a nonprofit
working to regulate marijuana like alcohol.

"This is a disaster of a program right now in New Jersey."

Both NORML and Caporusso are suing the state Department of Health
over implementation of the law. The case is now before the Appellate Division.

Of the six alternative treatment centers initially approved to grow
and dispense marijuana, five are still creeping through the
regulatory process. Greenleaf Compassion Center, the state's lone
center in operation, is no longer accepting new patients outside the
seven counties surrounding it.

Permits needed

The Compassionate Care Foundation in Egg Harbor Township and
Compassionate Care Centers of America Foundation, Inc. in Woodbridge
expect to open in the fall, according to Donna Leusner, spokeswoman
for the state Department of Health. Three others still don't have an
estimated opening date.

William Thomas, CEO of the Egg Harbor Township center, did not return
several calls or emails for comment. In an email, Leusner said the
center still needs a permit to grow plants "and as soon as they tell
the department they are ready to be inspected, we will send
inspectors out. We have done several pre-inspection visits to
streamline the process."

Compassionate Sciences is finalizing local approval for a facility in
South Jersey; its spokesman, Andrei Bogolubov, would not yet say
where. Earlier attempts to win favor in Maple Shade and Camden failed.

Bogolubov would not speculate on an opening date.

"It really depends on a lot of things, because at every stage, you're
working with the state to make sure you're meeting everything you
need to meet until you have that final permit issued," he explained.
"These things take more time, because this is such a rigorous
regulatory framework."

It's been hard for alternative treatment centers to find
municipalities willing to host them, Leusner said in an email. The
other top challenge? Building "a program that would withstand federal
scrutiny because the federal government considers marijuana illegal,"
she added.

Caporusso's lawyer, William Buckman of Moorestown, called that
response an excuse. One of the plaintiffs in the lawsuit died "in
unnecessary agony" without getting access to marijuana, he said.

"The feds have pretty much said they're not going to unduly harass or
interfere with legitimate medical marijuana schemes, and I don't
think that's a valid explanation for what's been going on here,"
Buckman insisted of state regulations.

"They've simply been dragging their feet and literally doing nothing."

Eighteen states and the District of Columbia have legalized medical
marijuana, and 11 more states have such legislation pending,
according to the Marijuana Policy Project, a nonprofit based in
Washington, D.C.

New Jersey's medical marijuana regulations are among the strictest in
the nation, said Matt Simon, a legislative analyst for the project.
The state was one of the first to legalize medical marijuana while
maintaining criminal penalties against patients who grow their own
cannabis. That restriction, among others, has contributed to the
delay, he added.

"It was an experiment, and the early returns (show) it has not been
successful in meeting the needs of patients. I hope other states will
look at New Jersey and see an example of what happens if access and
regulations are too burdensome and too restrictive."

The state's maximum penalties for illegally possessing two ounces of
marijuana - the most an alternative treatment center can dispense to
each patient for a month - remains an 18-month prison sentence and a
$25,000 fine.

Pain relief

Caporusso was among the first patients to pay the $200 registration
fee for his card. He waited for months for Greenleaf to call him in,
then drove two hours north to get his prescription.

"When I finally got home and was able to use it, the amount of relief
I was able to get out of it was amazing," said the father of a
4-year-old daughter. "All of a sudden, the pain stopped shooting up
and down my arms. The electrical shock feeling went away."

Caporusso said the cost for one ounce at Greenleaf is $600 cash, plus
7 percent sales tax - nearly double the street value. He can't afford
to buy more than that each month, so he usually suffers through the
last week of the month in pain.

When he's medicated, Caporusso said, "I'm far more coherent. I can
engage in conversation. When you're in pain constantly, it's hard to
be yourself. When the pain goes away, you can be normal and not have
to sit there in agony and have to pretend that everything is OK."

A marijuana prescription card must be approved by a doctor in the
state's marijuana registry. Doctors are required to apply for the
program. Only 221 doctors are enrolled in the state's database, and
they must have a "bona fide" relationship with a patient before
writing a prescription for marijuana.

Under current law, 14 medical conditions qualify, including multiple
sclerosis, Crohn's disease or terminal illness. Doctors can also
prescribe marijuana to treat cancer or AIDS patients suffering with
severe or chronic pain, nausea or vomiting or wasting syndrome.

Dr. Mark Angelo, director of palliative medicine at Cooper University
Health Care, said he has certified about 25 patients for the
marijuana program, but only one has been able to obtain the drug. He
called the program "very frustrating," and said his patients are
distressed and angry.

"I think the restrictions that are in the law are very appropriate,"
Angelo explained. "My problem has been in the implementation of the
law. The fact that there's only one center available for the entire
state has been incredibly difficult for my patients. By the time they
come to see me, they're very sick ...

"In terms of compassion, I certainly feel that's where we've been a
little bit deficient."

Dr. Stephen Goldfine, chief medical officer for Samaritan Hospice in
Marlton, called the law "well-written" and said it will ensure
medical marijuana is used appropriately. He recently completed the
state's registry requirements but has not yet issued a prescription
card for any of his patients, partly because of the delay in opening
alternative treatment centers.

Goldfine said pain makes it hard for terminally ill patients to get
out of the house and participate in family life during their last months.

"Some of the narcotic meds make people feel nauseous and sick,"
Goldfine said. "I think marijuana can actually help with that, as
well as relieve some of the pain and anxiety, too."

A parent's plea For some patients, marijuana may be a lifesaver.

Meghan Wilson of Scotch Plains recently made headlines for her fight
to get medical marijuana for her 2-year-old daughter, Vivian. The
toddler suffers from a rare and severe form of epilepsy called Dravet
syndrome. Patterns and bright colors - even dappled sunlight filtered
through trees - trigger multiple daily seizures.

The syndrome can also cause sudden unexplained death during sleep.
Wilson said anecdotal evidence has shown a particular strain of
marijuana that is low in psychoactiveTHC and high in cannabidiol can
reduce seizures in Dravet syndrome patients to about one every 10 days.

Though she has a prescription card and recommendations from her
pediatrician and neurologist, Vivian still needs approval from a
psychiatrist, according to state regulations for pediatric marijuana patients.

"Vivian is 2 and doesn't even say 'Mama,' " said Wilson. "I mean, it's a joke."

The 34-year-old mother thinks Christie doesn't understand the issue
and how it impacts patients.

"He just hears medical marijuana and minors and says, 'No, this will
not look good when I'm running for president,' " Wilson lamented.
"What I want to say to him is, 'Gov. Christie, what if this was your
kid? What if this was your grandchild?'

"And I want to bring my iPad and show him a video I have of Vivian at
8 months old seizing for 45 minutes, running out of air and being
intubated, and say, 'Look at this. Wouldn't you do anything you could?'

"What is the harm in allowing this?"

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So,... Montana commercial interests abused their law, stretched it beyond its meager limitations, and it cost them. Federally and State level. 

 

 Be glad there were people in this state that fought off the first backlash to abuse of the Michigan law known as the "Walsh Bills".  People pushed too far and the State started a backlash.

 

 The worst was narrowly averted in Michigan; not in Montana.

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Hey malumutt u sit in meetings. Where u spout your crap u and the other dirt ball celliach telling people quit s how they do nothing upporting Michigan norml saying how bad they all are and we should follow u and your super power mop u truley are clueless. Just remember the two worst things for medical in the up has been u and glassclock just shut up already

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I would argue that home growing is not for the majority either. You really think there are over 50,000 legal home grows in the state? I don't want them to go away, just less parroting that it is the only suitable way.

 

Why don't you guys ever bring up the dispensary model in California? Must not fit your agenda.

 

Hayduke

 

Thanks bud.

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Cali is pretty different than Michigan in laws and how the local counties issue the cards.  I don't even know how to compare them apples to apples.  As far as caregivers, I assume most if not all grow for their patients.  Last I looked that number was around 30,000.  And there are many many more patients growing than caregivers.  

 

I believe dispensaries are viable but only if rights to grow your own meds are permitted.  Otherwise you are signing onto a "Walmart" type of big business set up.  Unfortunately it is quite unlikely the powers that be will allow both the caregiver system and the dispensary system to sit side by side.

 

Mal's multi post was pretty on the mark about where the "dispensary" model proponents wish to go... they wish to trade our rights to get their monopoly.

 

I will never support that bs.  

 

dispensaries used to serve no more than 20% of the patient population in Michigan.  Those folks do not deserve to be disenfranchised from the program, but it is also fair to say they should not be allowed to jam up the current people in the current legal model.

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I would argue that home growing is not for the majority either. You really think there are over 50,000 legal home grows in the state? I don't want them to go away, just less parroting that it is the only suitable way.

 

Why don't you guys ever bring up the dispensary model in California? Must not fit your agenda.

 

Hayduke

 

Thanks bud.

to be clear OG, yes there are more than 50,000 home grows in Michigan, the numbers from LARA make that pretty clear...

 

We have no agenda regarding Cali dispensaries.  

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Hey malumutt u sit in meetings. Where u spout your crap u and the other dirt ball celliach telling people quit s how they do nothing upporting Michigan norml saying how bad they all are and we should follow u and your super power mop u truley are clueless. Just remember the two worst things for medical in the up has been u and glassclock just shut up already

 

 

 Awww, isn't that special.  You learned how to type just for me! 

 

:-)

 

 One of only 2 people we had to ask not to return to a compassion club meeting.  We almost had to call the police on you for acting like a lunatic at the public library.

 

 A true model citizen you are.

 

Have a nice day!

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Hay&Mal

 

Which numbers show that? I can honestly say that most people I have ever met with Michigan cards did not have a grow. What were the CG numbers? 30,000+?

 

I could see 75,000 home grows. I don't want them to go away. I am against that completely. I just believe there needs to be retail outlets/clubs and open transfers.

 

How are out of states supposed to acquire? It is a part of the law.

 

Yes Cali is different, but so is Nevada. Money controls Clark county. Always has, always will. I lived there in 09 when dispensaries were open there for 6 months. Its not the dispensary people doing this out there. It is the State legislators looking to get rich. Word is even if it passes it wont hold up, even with the 2016 grandfather.

Edited by OG Fire Beaster
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All I can say is correlation is not causation. Clark County controls the state. Dispensaries were already there and the state nixed it for no other reason then that they were not getting their "cut". You don't have to believe me, but many people that are in the dispensary "crowd" are not part of this mega money lobby group that some here paint them to be. The politicians are more often than not the guilty parties. They want money that they will lose from the traditional anti groups made up somehow.

 

I could care less what the thought patrol on these boards thinks of me. Open transactions and retail activity will be what breaks the flood gates nation wide.

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