Jump to content

Mitigation Of Post-Traumatic Stress Symptoms By Cannabis Resin: A Review Of The Clinical And Neurobiological Evidence


Recommended Posts

 

 

 

It is known from clinical studies that some patients attempt to cope with the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) by using recreational drugs. This review presents a case report of a 19-year-old male patient with a spectrum of severe PTSD symptoms, such as intense flashbacks, panic attacks, and self-mutilation, who discovered that some of his major symptoms were dramatically reduced by smoking cannabis resin. The major part of this review is concerned with the clinical and preclinical neurobiological evidence in order to offer a potential explanation of these effects on symptom reduction in PTSD. This review shows that recent studies provided supporting evidence that PTSD patients may be able to cope with their symptoms by using cannabis products. Cannabis may dampen the strength or emotional impact of traumatic memories through synergistic mechanisms that might make it easier for people with PTSD to rest or sleep and to feel less anxious and less involved with flashback memories. The presence of endocannabinoid signalling systems within stress-sensitive nuclei of the hypothalamus, as well as upstream limbic structures (amygdala), point to the significance of this system for the regulation of neuroendocrine and behavioural responses to stress. Evidence is increasingly accumulating that cannabinoids might play a role in fear extinction and antidepressive effects. It is concluded that further studies are warranted in order to evaluate the therapeutic potential of cannabinoids in PTSD. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

 

 

 

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/dta.1377/abstract?deniedAccessCustomisedMessage=&userIsAuthenticated=false

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

PTSD was added to list of conditions in Oct.

 

Israeli doctors have a long history of cannabis study, and use with Holocost victims. As a combat veteran myself with a history of PTSD, I can tell you this is a safe effective medication for the disorder. Since the Vietnam war, VA PTSD patients are given heavy doses of anti-psychotics, and most have bad side effects, most include sucidal ideation like Zoloft, etc. 

 

This is a perfect treatment for the disorder, mild, effective, but most of all safe.

 

Edited by TDM327
Link to comment
Share on other sites

thank you for sharing your experiences here. This is good information that patients need. Have you ever any hassle with the VA for use?

PTSD was added to list of conditions in Oct.

 

Israeli doctors have a long history of cannabis study, and use with Holocost victims. As a combat veteran myself with a history of PTSD, I can tell you this is a safe effective medication for the disorder. Since the Vietnam war, VA PTSD patients are given heavy doses of anti-psychotics, and most have bad side effects, most include sucidal ideation like Zoloft, etc. 

 

This is a perfect treatment for the disorder, mild, effective, but most of all safe.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

At present, I think the VA is taking a don't ask don't tell policy on this issue. The medical benefit possibilities are enormous but with the size of the VA, the bureaucracy, and their long history of considering cannabis use a substance abuse issue its going to be difficult for them to change, but I do see them using Pharm cannabis meds in the future. There is so little scientific info, but CBN seems to cover a lot of med issues on a broad range of medical problems.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I came home from Iraq the VA gave me a huge bottle of Seroquel (Quetiapine Fumarate), heavy duty, seriously bad stuff. I never took any of it because I did my research on it. It is a drug they use to treat schizophrenics and others with major psychoses. I did start taking the Citalopram they prescribed me, which is an SSRI, and it helped a little but I felt like I lived in a fog. My memory was terrible and it had other side effects. I couldn't stand it anymore so I stopped taking it. I smoke pot now to help me with my anger and sleep problems, it does more than any prescription medication ever has to keep me going. Now I can grow my own medicine and not be a slave to the VA and drug companies.

 

The Army released a study in 2011 or 2012 saying that 25%-35% of all returning wounded Soldiers are addicted to prescription narcotics given to them by the military health system. My friends still on active duty say that pill addiction is a big problem everywhere they are stationed, even in TRADOC posts. That's a scary statistic. all those soldiers rely on someone else to supply them with the meds they are told they need to get by. I prefer to control my own supply of meds. I tell all Veterans I know to grow their own. It really helps.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I came home from Iraq the VA gave me a huge bottle of Seroquel (Quetiapine Fumarate), heavy duty, seriously bad stuff. I never took any of it because I did my research on it. It is a drug they use to treat schizophrenics and others with major psychoses. I did start taking the Citalopram they prescribed me, which is an SSRI, and it helped a little but I felt like I lived in a fog. My memory was terrible and it had other side effects. I couldn't stand it anymore so I stopped taking it. I smoke pot now to help me with my anger and sleep problems, it does more than any prescription medication ever has to keep me going. Now I can grow my own medicine and not be a slave to the VA and drug companies.

 

The Army released a study in 2011 or 2012 saying that 25%-35% of all returning wounded Soldiers are addicted to prescription narcotics given to them by the military health system. My friends still on active duty say that pill addiction is a big problem everywhere they are stationed, even in TRADOC posts. That's a scary statistic. all those soldiers rely on someone else to supply them with the meds they are told they need to get by. I prefer to control my own supply of meds. I tell all Veterans I know to grow their own. It really helps.

Seroquel i was also given this and i took it for a year or longer it's a bad drug for sure i have been out of the Army for sometime now i just don't understand how someone that is given a Gun and a pill can do the right thing

But if someone is using Cannabis can't even own one

 

P.S

Welcome Home

Edited by bobandtorey
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks brother. Some days it's good to be home and other days I wish I was back in the war. At least over there I could fight those who were trying to harm me. Here they call themselves lawmakers and police and it's prison or death to even challenge them. They can kick in your door without a warrant and if you defend your Constitutionally protected rights they can kill you on the spot without a trial. Hell, they can even seize your assets and ruin your good name without convicting you of a crime! At least for now. The times, they are a-changin'.

 

I tried to post a link to the military narcotics addiction story I referenced above but I can't post a link. I guess I'll have to type it out by hand.

Go to www.stripes.com/news/va-study-ptsd-patients-more-often-prescribed-potent-opioids-1.170782

 

Since 2007 the anti-schizophrenic drug Seroquel has been the Veterans Administrations #2 drug expenditure, right behind Lasix water pills for the old Vets with congestive heart failure.

www.nydailynews.com/life-style/health/sleepless-vets-prescribed-seroquel-nightmare-beginning-article-1.206526

 

This is just the tip of the iceberg. The military health system (VA included) are some of our drug industries best customers. Thank you for your service Soldier. Here's a life-altering drug addiction for you. Welcome home. More to follow.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

most if not all school shooters in our country were prescribed these same experimental psychotropic drugs before their crimes, in fact, epidemic  school shooting didn't begin to happen until these were black label approved in the first place..

 

Front Line Pharmacists are in control of our military machine, a comforting thought for sure.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

the VA has there own pharmacy and makes many of the drugs themselves..

 

which scares me even more than corporate interests doing it..

 

i told the VA proudly i use cannabis.

 

i talk about it regularly and it is in many of my records..

 

that scares me on some basis but also makes me feel very proud.  i am in it to help as many people as i can.

 

at my recent C&P exam i discussed cannabis therapy in detail with one of the substance abuse counselors and they agree... believe it or not that cannabis is the best option for most veterans. (and probably normal humans too :) )

they just can't talk about it...

 

yet.

 

i hope to help change the system.  i "keep it real" with my VA doctors and so far every one has identified with me and been very interested in the medical benefits of its use.

 

recently at my diagnostic exam i had to undergo anesthesia and the anesthesiologist was so very interested in medically infused foods...

 

it was fun and exciting to discuss it and be a positive part of helping people understand and change their minds about cannabis use and benefits....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share



×
×
  • Create New...