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Medical Marijuana Dispensary Owners Reach Plea Deal; Won't Face Additional Charges


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The couple behind the now defunct Fowlerville-area medical marijuana dispensary has reached a plea deal with prosecutors.


Christi Marshall, 38, and her husband, Alan Marshall, 40, who operated Marshall Alternatives, pleaded guilty this morning in 44th Circuit Court in Howell to delivering and manufacturing marijuana.


 


In exchange for their plea, prosecutors agreed not to authorize additional charges stemming from two alleged delivery of marijuana incidents in December in Unadilla Township.


 


Marshall Alternatives medical assistant Stephanie Lynn Baxter, 31, also pleaded guilty to delivery of marijuana without enumeration, a misdemeanor punishable by up to one year in the county jail.


 


Sentencing is July 18. Christie Marshall faces up to four years in prison, but her husband faces up to eight years because it's his second offense.


 


The Marshall couple and two former employees were charged for selling the drug to an undercover narcotics officer who posed as a card-carrying medical marijuana patient in February 2011 and in May 2011.


 


Former employee April Sundie Smith faces sentencing June 27 after earlier pleading guilty to deliver or manufacture marijuana, according to Livingston County Circuit Court records.


 


The cases against the four co-defendants were placed on hold in April 2012 while the state Supreme Court heard arguments on a similar case, in which the Isabella County prosecutor wanted the courts to declare a medical marijuana dispensary, Compassionate Apothecary, a nuisance and close it.


 


Supreme Court justices ruled this year that medical marijuana dispensaries are not permitted under Michigan’s Medical Marihuana Act, which voters approved in 2008.


 


http://www.livingstondaily.com/article/20130614/NEWS06/130614002/Medical-marijuana-dispensary-owners-reach-plea-deal-won-t-face-additional-charges

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Livingston County judge amended bond for four people charged in connection to a now-defunct medical marijuana dispensary, but he declined one defendant's request to use marijuana for medicinal purposes.
An attorney for Christi Marshall, co-owner of Marshall Alternatives in Handy Township, asked the judge Wednesday to allow her client to use medical marijuana because Marshall is allergic to narcotics and suffers severe effects from using traditional medications.
Circuit Judge Michael P. Hatty declined that request, but he did say Christi Marshall and her co-defendants can use medications as prescribed by legitimate physicians.
Christi Marshall and her co-defendants — her husband, Alan Marshall, 39; Stephanie Lynn Baxter, 30; and April Sundie Smith, 44 — also sought to reduce the number of times they test for marijuana use and to eliminate the alcohol testing from their bond requirements.
Hatty granted those requests, ordering all defendants to be tested for marijuana at least two times a month. He ordered Baxter to also test twice a month for other illegal narcotics.
The Marshall couple and Baxter, of Howell, were charged with delivering marijuana for allegedly selling the drug to an undercover narcotics officer who posed as a card-carrying medical marijuana patient in February 2011 and in May.
Smith, of Pinckney, also is charged with possession of marijuana with intent to deliver in connection to the Marshall Alternatives raids.
Their criminal cases are on hold pending a state Supreme Court decision on a similar case, State v. McQueen, in which the Isabella County prosecutor wants the courts to declare medical marijuana dispensary Compassionate Apothecary a nuisance and close it.
The Isabella County Circuit Court denied the request, and the prosecutor appealed. The Michigan Court of Appeals in August reversed the lower court's ruling and held that the Michigan Medical Marihuana Act does not allow for the sale of marijuana.
The state Supreme Court has granted Compassionate Apothecary's application to appeal the decision. The court's decision could affect how and whether the Livingston County case against Marshall Alternatives would proceed.

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Livingston County judge amended bond for four people charged in connection to a now-defunct medical marijuana dispensary, but he declined one defendant's request to use marijuana for medicinal purposes.

An attorney for Christi Marshall, co-owner of Marshall Alternatives in Handy Township, asked the judge Wednesday to allow her client to use medical marijuana because Marshall is allergic to narcotics and suffers severe effects from using traditional medications.

Circuit Judge Michael P. Hatty declined that request, but he did say Christi Marshall and her co-defendants can use medications as prescribed by legitimate physicians.

Christi Marshall and her co-defendants — her husband, Alan Marshall, 39; Stephanie Lynn Baxter, 30; and April Sundie Smith, 44 — also sought to reduce the number of times they test for marijuana use and to eliminate the alcohol testing from their bond requirements.

Hatty granted those requests, ordering all defendants to be tested for marijuana at least two times a month. He ordered Baxter to also test twice a month for other illegal narcotics.

The Marshall couple and Baxter, of Howell, were charged with delivering marijuana for allegedly selling the drug to an undercover narcotics officer who posed as a card-carrying medical marijuana patient in February 2011 and in May.

Smith, of Pinckney, also is charged with possession of marijuana with intent to deliver in connection to the Marshall Alternatives raids.

Their criminal cases are on hold pending a state Supreme Court decision on a similar case, State v. McQueen, in which the Isabella County prosecutor wants the courts to declare medical marijuana dispensary Compassionate Apothecary a nuisance and close it.

The Isabella County Circuit Court denied the request, and the prosecutor appealed. The Michigan Court of Appeals in August reversed the lower court's ruling and held that the Michigan Medical Marihuana Act does not allow for the sale of marijuana.

The state Supreme Court has granted Compassionate Apothecary's application to appeal the decision. The court's decision could affect how and whether the Livingston County case against Marshall Alternatives would proceed.

More wasted tax payer money on something that is eventually going to be legalized outright.

 

 

IT IS ONLY A MATTER OF TIME. . .BEFORE LEGALIZATION. 

 

WHAT WILL ALL THESE COPS, pA'S AND PROBATION OFFICER DO WHEN THIS SHIET IS LEGALIZED.....HMMM..FORCED TO DO THEIR FUXING JOBS AND FEAL GO DEAL  WITH REAL VIOLENT CRIMINALS, RAPISTS, PEDAPHILES, MURDERERS, DRUNKS, WIFE BEATERS, .!

 

ABSOLUTE WASTE OF TIME AND MONEY .  DISGUSTS ME  WHAT THIS SYSTEM IS BUILT AROUND.

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That's exactly what we used to say in 1976.

 

 

 

Yea but that was then..........

 

I would guess we are within 5 years......Or less ...... from full on legalization here in Michigan and maybe even nationally......

 

 

Edited to add..... The way the State is dumping on medical marijuana so much...... we may even be closer to 3 years to full on legalization.......... The State is cutting it's own throat and don't even realize it. And there is where your true concern about losing home grows should lie.....

Edited by ozzrokk
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I wonder if the cops are going to be charged for falsifying documents to get their cards!

 

Peace

Jim

 

Why would they have to falsify records?  They can just get a card issued or make a copy of a card.  It's called "going undercover" and is totally legal for them to do in pursuit of a case.

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Why would they have to falsify records?  They can just get a card issued or make a copy of a card.  It's called "going undercover" and is totally legal for them to do in pursuit of a case.

Oh yea I forgot, we are the country that spies on its citizens! and the rest of the world and think it is ok, man dont spy on them or tell their spying secrets or your gonna have to live in communist countrys, lol!

 

Sometimes I think why bother? I guess they can do what ever they want, nothing is gonna change the way I grew up and what ive done! law or no law, man I realy didnt think it was the smartest thing to do when I gave the state all of my info and narced on myself!!!

 

Peace

Jim

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I wonder if the cops are going to be charged for falsifying documents to get their cards!

 

Peace

Jim

 

 

No. It is legal for the police to lie to you, but illegal for you to lie to the police. So, two medical marijuana patients can be thrown in jail for sharing their marijuana, but the police are immune from prosecution for enticing two patients to share their marijuana.

 

Weird...

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Oh yea I forgot, we are the country that spies on its citizens! and the rest of the world and think it is ok, man dont spy on them or tell their spying secrets or your gonna have to live in communist countrys, lol!

 

Sometimes I think why bother? I guess they can do what ever they want, nothing is gonna change the way I grew up and what ive done! law or no law, man I realy didnt think it was the smartest thing to do when I gave the state all of my info and narced on myself!!!

 

Peace

Jim

 

 

It is kind of ironic that back in the seventies Russia was a pariah in the world because of the level of spying that it did on its own citizens. Fast forward to 2013. Now the US and other Western countries have surpassed or at least matched the level of spying that gave Russia such a bad reputation. And it's all being done in the name of "Freedom" for God's sake. I don't mind the government spying on people who present a clear and present danger to me, but spying on me because of my personal, adult choices that harm no one? Really? Is that what freedom is all about?

 

I also have wondered about the appropriateness of my choice to be put on a list of known marijuana sympathizers. The fear I feel is real.

 

Like Ronald Reagan said: "The scariest words you can hear are "HI. We are the government and we are here to help you"".

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It is kind of ironic that back in the seventies Russia was a pariah in the world because of the level of spying that it did on its own citizens. Fast forward to 2013. Now the US and other Western countries have surpassed or at least matched the level of spying that gave Russia such a bad reputation. And it's all being done in the name of "Freedom" for God's sake. I don't mind the government spying on people who present a clear and present danger to me, but spying on me because of my personal, adult choices that harm no one? Really? Is that what freedom is all about?

 

I also have wondered about the appropriateness of my choice to be put on a list of known marijuana sympathizers. The fear I feel is real.

 

Like Ronald Reagan said: "The scariest words you can hear are "HI. We are the government and we are here to help you"".

i guess thats why people still are opening their front doors and grows to Leo 

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