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Congress And Obama Have Been Too Timid On Reform


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Washington, D.C. -- Even as support for ending marijuana prohibition is building around the country, Congress and the Obama administration remain far too timid about the need for change.

 

Last year, residents in Alaska, Oregon and the District of Columbia voted to join Colorado and Washington State in making recreational use of marijuana legal. Later this year, residents of Ohio are expected to vote on a ballot measure that would legalize it. Nevadans will vote on a legalization proposal next year. And Californians could vote on several similar measures next year.

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One major move towards legalization or liberalizing cannabis laws at the Federal level by the Democrats will have the Republicans foaming at the mouth. They will label Democrats as drug pushers who are pushing the USA off the cliff of immorality.

 

Even though we all know (and they probably do too) that this is BS, a good number of citizens will buy into the Republican's fear mongering and they may score some major political points. The Democrats can't come out too hard in favor of legalization or they may suffer some political losses.

 

Quite the tangled web that the US government has created with cannabis.

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